"Do kogo idziemy na obiad?"

Translation:Whose place are we going to for lunch?

May 7, 2016

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MonicaMcIl

"To whom are we going for lunch?" is very awkward, I don't think anyone would realistically every use this sentence. Where I am from nobody uses "to whom" or "with whom." This seems like very formal old English if anything. Whenever I approach this question I feel like it's just trying to confuse me. Personally I think a more accurate translation would be something like: "Whose place are we going to for lunch?" I just have a problem with the word "whom" because it's really only found in books imo. English is much more casual than it used to be.

August 17, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei
Mod
  • 2

Well, that's still the closest equivalent and it's correct, even if not that common. Sure, I can add your answer, we can be more lenient with accepted translations if the sentence doesn't translate that easily.

August 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/profedelenguas

I have no issue with "to whom" or "for whom". The problem with this English sentence is that you don't go to a person (whom), you go to a place. That's where I agree with Monica from above: "Whose place are we going to for lunch?" Duolingo's translation is bad English. You need a possessive + a location.

March 24, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei
Mod
  • 2

OK, that will be the main English answer now.

March 24, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StLd

Maybe this sentence would make sense in British English but as an American i don't get it. Is this like "who are we going to lunch with?" Or "who's house are we going to eat lunch at?" Or "where are we going for lunch?"

June 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei
Mod
  • 2

Whose house are we going to eat lunch at.

June 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Augustine2017

Yuk.
The official answer is a bit formal, but certainly correct, and preferable to this one.
"Whose place/house are we going to for lunch?" is much better.
"Where are we going for lunch?" would maybe be the most likely thing to say, but of course that's not a translation for this polish sentence.
As you point out below, some sentences just don't translate easily. :-)

September 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TonySmith269390

Nobody in England says this in all seriousness, although you might say it as a kind of humorous affectation.

July 15, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ejbrsb1

In which case is "obiad"? I thought nouns following the preposition "na" were in the Locative case and therefore "obiad" would have an "e" at the end.

April 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei
Mod
  • 2

But it's not like something is literally on the lunch, right?

Eating something for some meal needs the meal to be in Accusative. I mean "na + Acc."

(Locative of "obiad" is "obiedzie", by the way).

April 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/krubo

How about "Whose house are we going to for lunch?"

August 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei
Mod
  • 2

That's a little bit too much, it assumes that they live in a house and not an apartment, right?

August 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeanette364461

Have to agree that no native english speaker would ever utter this sentence, except an English teacher as a joke. I put "whose house are we having lunch at" and was marked incorrect. Yes, there is a distinction between house and apartment, but this is the most likely to be used.

January 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pacecarotepatate

Why is lunch not acceptable as a translation for obiad in this exercise?

May 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei
Mod
  • 2

Obviously it should be, report it next time.

May 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wippii

Why not "Who are we going to for lunch"?

May 28, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei
Mod
  • 2

Sounds fine, added.

May 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Glen624972

I hate to pile on, but this sentence makes absolutely no sense in English. It may make sense in Polish, and I am sure it does, but NOT in English.

September 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/karolts

What is wrong with : To whom are we going for the dinner?

October 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexLivins

dinner

January 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei
Mod
  • 2

"dinner" is fine, I believe that "the" is strange though.

January 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Augustine2017

Yes. "To whom" sounds like you are probably going to someone's home, so you would be going "for dinner".

The only scenario I can think of where you might say "the dinner" is if you are talking about a specific dinner, like a Christmas dinner, an Awards dinner, a Farewell dinner, something like that. Then you might say "Where will the dinner be held?"

January 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexLivins

Looking at this discussion it seems weird that I got everything right apart from "going to lunch" instead of "going for lunch". However I'm pretty sure "going to lunch" should be ok too.

January 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/profedelenguas

You do not go to a person; you go to a place. The English translation is not correct. To indicate the person, you must use the possessive "whose" + a noun to indicate the location.

March 24, 2019
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