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  5. "Gwlad braf ydy Cymru."

"Gwlad braf ydy Cymru."

Translation:Wales is a fine country.

May 11, 2016

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HaroldWonh

Agreed - so long as "fine" doesn't mean "not raining"!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kevin747595

Now I am confused - so far everything that has been taught about "is" as a positive statement has been using "mae" in the third person, e.g. "Mae Megan yn canu" etc. We have been told that "ydy" is used when asking a question in the third person, e.g. "Ydy hi'n gweithio?". So how come ydy suddenly appears in this expression to mean "is"? Does that mean I could have been saying all along "Megan ydy x", rather than "Mae Megan x" to mean "Megan is something or other"? Why isn't it "Mae Cymru yn braf"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HighInquiry

Because in sentences where you are identifying the profession, name, identity, etc. of the subject, you put that bit before the verb, and that changes the verb to the question form. ''Dw i'n lwcus'' ''Cath lwcus dw i.'' ''Mae hi'n lwcus'' ''Cath lwcus ydy/yw hi''


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/melinydre

One place with which to start in understanding the emphatic form is this:

https://duome.eu/tips/en/cy

Search for "emphatic".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eleonoraonline

Sorry, could you explain this with different examples? You're saying "I am lucky" and then "I am a lucky cat", is there any reason for this? I can kind of get it from your earlier explanation in the post and thinking back of "Fred dw i", but then the examples really threw me. Diolch!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AussieDanYGroes

Im guessing the difference is that 'cath' is a noun.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EmmaMitche89062

The second two sentence examples are just third person singular equivalents of the first two sentences, the final one corresponding with "Gwlad braf ydy Cymru". Sorry I can't explain grammar definitions though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Draiglladwr

That is an amazing explanation which I am still trying to grasp. Is this a rule I missed in earlier lessons about 'Ydy'. Does it mean that the statement "Wales is a fine country" is actually a question? Or is the rule that 'Subject is x attribute' precedes verb which then requires the interrogative form. Is it attribute of subject or preceeding the verb which requires the interrogative. I hope you understand my question and I am sorry to have written so much but I really want to understand. Thank you


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Draiglladwr

To HighInquiry: That is an amazing explanation which I am still trying to grasp. Is this a rule I missed in earlier lessons about 'Ydy'. Does it mean that the statement "Wales is a fine country" is actually a question? Or is the rule that 'Subject is x attribute' precedes verb which then requires the interrogative form. Is it attribute of subject or preceeding the verb which requires the interrogative. I hope you understand my question and I am sorry to have written so much but I really want to understand. Thank you


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thomas318777

There are two concepts that you need to think about here, and there seems to be a partial overlap between them:

  1. Fronting. In some languages, the way to emphasize a particular word is to move it to the front of the sentence. We sometimes do this is English, but more often we just speak louder when we get to the word we want to emphasize. For instance, if I asked “Is Sioned Owen's cousin?”, you might reply “No, Sioned is Owen's SISTER!”, and you would say “sister” louder because that's the information that's new to me. But in Welsh, you would emphasize the new information by moving it to the front of the sentence: “Chwaer Owen ydy Sioned!”

  2. Identification sentences. When you're identifying one ‘thing’ as being the same as another ‘thing’, you emphasize the newest information by putting it at the front. For instance, if we both know Dylan but only you know that he's a farmer, you would start your explanation with “ffermwr” because that's what's new to me: “Ffermwr ydy Dylan”. On the other hand, if I asked you if Ceri is a farmer, you might want to point out that I've got the wrong person, and you would do so by moving “Dylan” to the front:— “Dylan ydy ffermwr”. These two versions are both identification sentences because you're telling me that the word “Dylan” and the word “ffermwr” both identify the same ‘thing’ (or in this case, person).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/melinydre

Thanks, Thomas. This is an excellent explanation! Diolch yn fawr!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jehra2

I feel like you guys might be biased...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rmcode
Mod
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Ever so slightly.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/David456014

Interesting use of the word braf, which to date has been applied to weather. In order to be complimentary, I should have though Hardd more appropriate. While mostly beautiful, the weather in Wales is not always fine.

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