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"Sono proprio contento vi sia piaciuta la mia ricetta."

Translation:I am really happy that you liked my recipe.

January 22, 2014

32 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jillkt

is a "che" between contento and vi really not necessary here? I know it's not in English, but normally Italian requires the 'che' or 'that' even when English doesn't.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mmseiple

Italian is more flexible on the use of "che" in relative clauses than some other Romance languages in similar structures (Spanish, for example). You will sometimes see instances where the "che" is dropped, like here. This is very common with the verbs "pensare" and "credere," for example. I would say, in cases of doubt, use the "che," since it is not wrong, any more than it would be wrong to say, "I'm happy that you liked," instead of, "I'm happy you liked."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/el-montunero

Could you give an example for the same thing in Spanish?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mmseiple

An example of what?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/el-montunero

Oh, sorry. I misunderstood your sentence. Nevermind! :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Roan866446

Very helpful! In German, one can, as in English, drop the conjunction, but not in French, so I assumed that Italian was the same.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Caterinabella

Confused as to what "sia" means in this sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OsoGegenHest

It is the subjunctive version of è.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EdwardDunne

Why not "I am really happy that you WERE PLEASED WITH my recipe"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lynnich

why can't I say "that you all liked my recipe?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mmseiple

Just an oversight - now it should be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lynnich

you are quick!! Thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ioyaz

Is piacere a reflexive verb? is that why "sia" is used here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ion1122

'sia' has nothing to do with reflexive. You are thinking of 'si'. 'sia' is the subjunctive form of 'è'. (In other words, 'be' instead of 'is'.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xyphax

Why is the 'vi' in the sentence? What does it mean?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/andromeda1815

The "vi" means you (plural). I am happy that YOU liked my recipe.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marianna88226

How do we know that this is past tense (liked) other than the theme of the lesson? I mean as a stand alone sentence, what indicates past tense of the word like.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mr.Keko

Sono contento vi sia piaciuta la ricetta-->the meal is over Sono contento vi piaccia la ricetta-->you are still eating


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ion1122

In English, 'likes' is a different tense from 'has liked' and 'pleases' is different from 'has pleased'. The italian here is analagous to 'has pleased': 'sia piaciuta' rather than 'piacia'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TimK77777

"sono proprio contento" also means "they are really happy" - correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mmseiple

No, "sono" can mean "they are," but here "contento" is singular, so it is referring to just one person.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TimK77777

Oh, right, thanks... still keep missing those endings...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chrissyprydun

why is this even subjunctive? Surely if someone is happy that someone liked their recipe, they already know that they liked it. It is fact not opinion so wouldn't one choose é instead of sia?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ion1122

The Italian subjunctive has a much broader use than just in counterfactual statements.

For example, it is used in dependent clauses after certain verbs of feeling, as in the DL exercise here.

There are similar patterns in English. For example, we say "If I were king" instead of "If I was king" because we are dealing with a counterfactual or hypothetical.

However, we can also say "It is important that he be there" instead of "It is important that he is there". Here "be" is a subjunctive in a dependent clause following the phrase "it is important".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MariaIramendy

Where is the che in the Italian dependent sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ion1122

Your question is answered already on this very page. See the second comment from the top.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lucy163354

Why isn't che needed?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ion1122

lucy, read the first and second comments at the top of this page.

(Why do I get the feeling I'm repeating myself?)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lucy163354

Sorry, I usually write my comment first and then read the discussion. I did get the answer to my question, thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/8eCcAkhe

I wrote "I really am happy (...)" . To me that seems correct but it was rejected. Why? Leonard F.

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