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"She has the measurements."

Translation:Sie hat die Maße.

January 26, 2013

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lgarratt2

Ok hadn't seen Maße before


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shampguy

This is a hilarious sentence


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/andrija77

Yes, it sounds like she weights a ton, but it is completly opposite.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dghitc

Ha, I bet she has the measurement: 36" 24" 26"!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Oscypex

Zentimetern, bitte?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MattyDD

Can't wait to learn how to say Brickhouse haha


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LuckyNuke

My German wife insist Maße is pronounced wrong in Duolingo. Pressure should be on the a, not the ß.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/C.J.M.1

That's right. I already reported that elsewhere. duolingo pronounces it like 'Masse' which is an entirely different word. 'die Masse = the mass'. Pronounciation of 'Maße' should have a longer 'a'. Try pronouncing it like 'Nase' but use a sharper 's'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/opticalgenius

I thouhgt it was "den maße" for plural


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/serdna29

In the Dativ, yes. Right here Maße is in the Akkusativ, so the plural is die.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/didie14

I correctly wrote the sentence but the app said it was wrong (it says I forgot the "e" for "die Maße") ! Sooo confused...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/C.J.M.1

'das Maß' is singular. 'die Maße' is plural. The 'e' has the same function as the 's' at the end of 'measurments' - only that in German there is no standard way of building the plural form. Frau - Frauen, Tisch - Tische, Kind - Kinder. And there are the forms where the vowel changes, too: Mann - Männer, Stuhl - Stühle, You'll have to learn the plural forms by heart, I'm afraid.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pandit_dhirendra

Whats wrong in "Sie habe die Maße."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/didie14

Sie = she --> Sie hat. Habe is only for "ich" ("I") : Ich habe = I have


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/narion_k

Your sentence actually makes sense, but only if you know some advanced German. ;-) It would be an example of what's called reported or indirect speech.

For example, a man might tell a news reporter, "Sie hat die Maße." When the reporter writes an article, writing "Sie hat die Maße" would be the reporter saying that she has the measurements. Of course, he instead wants to simply report what the informant said, rather than owning the claim. So he instead writes, "Sie habe die Maße." Now his article says that she is reported to have the measurements.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/muffinseatfood

Does anyone know how to get this type of b in android?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TonyGL

Long press your 's' key, it works for me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GKFX

It's not a "b", it's a ligature of a long s (looks like f) and a normal s. fs →ß


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Peterpappy

Hold the s down until you see various kinds of s to choose from, one of which is ß, then slide your finger over to it. Same with typing an ümlaut (sp?), just hold, in that case, the u down, till the options come up, then slide over to the ü.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Osubin

I asked her to do some diagnostics of the lab equipment, of course.

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