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"Él marca la hora."

Translation:He marks the hour.

5 years ago

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Austin_Texas

I think "mark the hour" is current in British English, but in American English it's an antique usage that many people won't recognize. Most Americans would understand "note the hour," but that's also uncommon and sounds rather formal or British. The best colloquial American translation is "He notes the time."

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Seb182

not current in British English either

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmceleney
rmceleney
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"He marks the hour" isn't a very British thing to say either. I've lived in Britain and Ireland all my life, and the literal translation sounded quite odd to me. Note would probably be more common.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dhMuse
dhMusePlus
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Sounds strange to Canadian ears, too.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/beanz

Same here and i'm in Scotland, It's not commonly used in Scotland either. I've found that a lot of the translations don't make sense.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chacala

I think marca can mean to observe, mark or note

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sra.Scott

Wouldn't He checks the hour also be a translation?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmceleney
rmceleney
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Asked two Spanish speakers what this means (one a native Spanish speaker, the other a native English speaker who is fluent in Spanish). It seems to be just as meaningless in Spanish as it is in English (i.e. it requires some kind of context in order to give it meaning - it doesn't really mean anything as an expression in itself).

As in English, it could be noting the time on paper/blackboard/chart (but without said object mentioned, this isn't clear). If you were talking about a form or a spreadsheet it would be "He enters the time". It could be someone pointing out the time or emphasising the time. Unfortunate that Duolingo insists on "mark" rather than the many other verbs that are equivalent to "marcar".

Both Spanish speakers were very puzzled when I asked what it means. Context is everything, so not worth worrying about. As with the English translation given, you'll probably never hear anyone say it as a standalone phrase.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Poska

Quote from someone born and living in Chile, for whom spanish is her first language: "its common in books and it means "the clock marked the hour" . Apparently not much used in spoken spanish in Chile.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lfwake2wake

It's not meaningless in English. "New York residents stand in Times Square on New Years Eve, marking the hour until the ball drops and the party begins." I hear this every year when people are anticipating something.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roger_Burke

One definition of a Node is: "A hole in the gnomon of a dial, through which passes the ray of light which MARKS THE HOUR of the day, the parallels of the sun's declination, his place in the ecliptic, etc."

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Poska

No, it doesn't make sense in english english either. Can't think what they mean! Google translate gives "the mark when" - which also does not make sense.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lfwake2wake

"He marks the hour when he will see her again." It's an expression often seen in written text but wouldn't be spoken.

5 years ago