https://www.duolingo.com/Queen_Keira

Esperantists, heed my call!

I am learning Esperanto, as y'all probably guessed. My parents, however, think doing so is a waste of time. I'd like to ask you what you think has been the most rewarding part of your Esperanto journey, so far. What are the benefits of learning a constructed language?

Dankon!

2 years ago

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
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Dear Queen_Keira's parents,

I have heard you think that learning Esperanto is a waste of time. I am writing to let you know that I agree. Esperanto certainly is not a path to respectable employment, and there is no country where Esperanto is spoken. If you put Esperanto on your resume, the response at an interview (if you get one) will certainly be "what the heck is that."

I can also tell you that any other language that I have learned has been a waste of time as well. My minor in German once generated a lot of excitement from a job agent. This lasted about a week, and never came to anything. I currently work in a company with a branch in Germany and ... nobody seems to care that I speak German. One could argue that my knowing German once saved my son's life, but given the countless hours I spent getting to the level I am now, I could have gotten a part time job and hired a German-speaking tour guide many times over instead.

There are a lot of things that we do that are a waste of time. For most people art, crossword puzzles, reading and writing fiction, video games, and sudoku are a waste of time. Wasting time with Esperanto has been quite an enriching experience for me - not unlike art, crossword puzzles, literature, and sudoku - and while I suggested that Esperanto is not a path to respectable employment, I do know several people who have found respectable employment thanks to contacts and friendships they have made through Esperanto.

I hope you will encourage Queen_Keira to waste time in a way which she sees fit. I mean, why would you want it any other way?

Amo kaj kisoj,

Tomaso

Patro kaj tempoperdanto.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Vanege
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> If you put Esperanto on your resume, the response at an interview (if you get one) will certainly be "what the heck is that."

I have Esperanto on my resume. It is the best thing. It comes up in half of my interviews. I can speak passionately about it and it always give a good impression. It shows that I am a dedicated and culturaly open.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Evildea

It's on me resume as well and got me my current job. They were looking for culturally sensitive people due to my work environment.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
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True story: As I was composing my message, I anticipated your reply, so I was very careful to use the expression "respectable employment".

By the way, for those reading along, I certainly don't think Esperanto is a waste of time or something that doesn't belong on a resume.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
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Oh, I have it on my resume too. I just would never tell Queen_Keira's parents that. :-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JC-Belgium
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Hi, I will tell you a little bit more of my Esperanto journey and the benefits of it:

  1. Esperanto is a very easy language to learn, so you can master the grammar very fast. Your vocabulary will increase later. So you don't waste a lot of time studying grammar and vocabulary.
  2. The Esperanto vocabulary contains words from Romance (60%), Germanic (30%) and Slavic (5%) languages. So when you know English and Spanish for example, you will recognize a lot of words in Esperanto. When you have studied Esperanto, it could help you when you are learning another Germanic language.
  3. Esperanto is a universal language. It is used all around the world and there are Esperanto events where you can practice your speaking skills. You can also find speakers online. I have found a couple of speakers on Speaky and I often practice with them.
  4. Your parents are wrong if they think that it is a waste of time. Everything you learn, can come in handy later.
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/balou67
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The most rewarding part for me was partying/playing/drinking/dancing/singing (in the audience, on stage, around a camp fire or under the rain)/travelling/chatting/sharing/food-tasting/sightseeing whatever the hour, the country or the external temperature (from new year in Poland to summertime in Brazil) and, most importantly, making friends around the world in the process and as a terrible side effect, willing to learn my friends' languages too^^. (I forgot to mention summertime in Hungary, next to a lake, where we were eaten by mosquitos every night or the time I'd almost drown in the ocean in Brazil.) Every language opens a new world, but this one put me on a roller coaster among a bunch of clever, passionate, nice, conscious, caring, talented and finally crazy people :D

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ionasky
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The most rewarding thing was the speed at which my work paid off. Within hours I was reading simple sentances with a much lower error rate than other languages. I finished the duo tree in a few weeks and was soon able to understand the bulk (not all but most, ie enough to know what was going on) of what an esperanto youtuber was saying at normal speaking speed. I have only been learning esperanto since march, so that's about two months and i now mutter to myself trying to work out how to say things all the time, read articles, watch youtube videos and occasionally dream in esperanto. Even though i don't yet write or speak esperanto very well it has rapidly changed the way i think about lingustics and how I think of myself as a language learner. My journey with esperanto has turned me from a language learning dabbler to someone who has fluency in a language in their sights and the reason to belive that with a bit of hard work and practice it is possible for me to fully and comfortably aquire at least one other language. Give me a year or two and some of those esperanto youtube videos may even be mine!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Falsafaa
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The best thing that Esperanto offered to me that could not be offered from a natural language was that it allowed me to see how a language really works. And what I mean by that is that it was simple enough to show the most basic components of a language without being too confusing. I can make my own implications from there onwards. Learning it does have other benefits as well, but that specifically can only be granted to me by a simple, constructed language like Esperanto. My dad also said that it was a waste of time, but then he began to think otherwise when he saw the logic behind it. That said, he still doesn't think that it is useful enough to spend more time on it. At least learning a little bit of it got him to change his mind a little.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amuzulo
Mod
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A while back I wrote a blog post about this:
Is your hobby a waste of time?

I think your parents would find the following TEDx Talk interesting:
Learn Esperanto First

Benny Lewis wrote about Esperanto priming you for other languages:
Just 2 weeks learning Esperanto can get you months ahead in your target language

You probably don't want to give them all the links though... too much information can be overwhelming. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Merrowmic
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Esperanto is easy, regular and extremely versatile. In a matter of a day, one can master virtually all grammar and root words. All that is really left is some vocabulary that signifies one concept and doesn't change in form (except for plural forms), and practicing the usage of the affixes.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Vanege
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The most rewarding part is that I can write more fluently in Esperanto than in my fluent language. The feeling to be able to express myself precisely and easily is amazing. I feel more free, less imprisoned of the heavy cultural and linguistic origins.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pennybinker

If you are enjoying it, it is not a waste of time.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JanPaulido
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You get to study up on grammar , in your own language , spelling , in your own language , learn how to learn new languages , and millions of people do speak esperanto , dont pay attention to negativity , but dont try to learn it in a day ....... You will forget it in 3 lol , Esperanto is worth learning , even if just here and there in some spare time : )

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KimJoonHyuk
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Late to the party, but I will add that learning Esperanto (my third language) is reinforcing my Korean (my second language), and refining my English (my native language). Why? Because as I'm learning new vocabulary and grammar in Esperanto, I force myself to remember or teach myself the Korean vocabulary and grammar patterns that would allow me to say the same things in either English, Korean, or Esperanto. A lot of the reasons for why we speak a certain way in English is forgotten as soon as you stop taking English classes in high school (e.g. "Why do we say something a certain way? I don't know, it just sounds right that way.") Think about it - which one sounds more natural - "The lovely, old, square, green desk", or "the green, old, square, lovely desk"?

My wife said the same thing, about wasting my time, when I told her I was studying Esperanto. "It's not even the native language of any country? Why spend time learning that, when you should spend the time studying Korean instead." I can't tell you how many Korean words I've either re-learned because of studying Esperanto, or just learned for the first time because I never knew how to say them in Korean, but the Esperanto course introduced that word.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnKing147785

I'm still learning Esperanto and haven't tried speaking it with anyone. As far as constructed auxlangs go, I've seen newer ones that I think would be easier to learn than Esperanto, but since Esperanto has significantly more speakers I feel like I should stick with it. As far as it being a waste of time, it's not if you enjoy the language, and think you might use it in the future.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TamjungRabbit
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see this. learning esperanto help learning other language. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8gSAkUOElsg

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hxvan.
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A benefit for me was that it helped me with the pronunciation(Of all the languages that I'm studying: English, German, Portuguese, etc.).

For example, I'm a native speaker of Spanish and when I discovered the Esperanto, I wanted to study it because is the Auxiliary Language most used, but when I tried to learn its pronunciation(Through an English page) I couldn't understand it, so I avoided the Esperanto. Later I discovered an Esperanto Spanish page with a pronunciacion easier for Spanish speakers: http://jubilo.ca/esperanto/kurso/unikodo/1/1 But all changed when I discovered a page about Esperanto, in Wikipedia, in which in the pronunciation part they used IPA(International Phonetic Alphabet), which was the key to finally understand its pronunciation and pronouncing it correctly. And it brought me the benefit that I wrote above.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/v.ivanov
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Plej ofte menciata pluso de Esperanto estas ─Łuste tiu: faciligo de lernado de aliaj lingvoj.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ithaca101
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My parents feel the same way! :(

2 years ago
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