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Irish vocabulary frequency list: translation help!

Eard_Stapa
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Hello there! I found a great 6000+ word frequency list for Irish and I would like to make a nice fat Anki deck with it but it does not provide the English translations. I used a Google spreadsheet with a Google Translate formula for a quick translation of each word but even a beginner like me has already spotted some problems. I've started cross-checking them with Teanglann but that is a slow process by myself.

Anyways, if someone out there would like to help proofread and edit the translations (especially if you are proficient speaker!), the shared link is below. Feel free to contribute a fuller translation/definition or even add notes in the "C" column. And of course anyone else looking to flush out their Anki deck is welcome to download a copy of the spreadsheet at their leisure.

Here's the link: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1RMtur21fBLNwHSiJkXTFPCowR-wTwI0iTuiZJpILMlA/edit?usp=sharing

GRMA!

p.s. - For those of you who might use Awesome TTS to add audio to their Anki decks (for other languages), I have requested that Irish audio support (through Teanglann and Abair) be added. Someone is already working on it so look forward to automated Irish audio in Awesome TTS soon! Combined with the word list above, I'm hoping to make a really quality Irish vocab deck once some pictures are added as well.

2 years ago

2 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Fingolfin1346

Where did you get the frequency list Eard-Stapa? I don't see bí/tá or is in the top 20 and they are definitely among the most common. I tried something like this myself last year using Michal Boleslav Měchura's list of the most common Irish lemmas (the dictionary form or a word) http://www.lexiconista.com/datasets/

I didn't get very far as I found that single word flashcards bored me and didn't seem to stick but if it works for you then good luck. I have been transcribing every exercise from Micheál Ó Siadhail's Learning Irish and finding that works for me. One difficulty with single word flashcards for Irish is that they don't help you with mutations or with the language's syntactic structures. Have you had better luck with them?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eard_Stapa
Eard_Stapa
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Yes, that is the exact list I used. I think the list doesn't include bí, tá, and is because I originally started editing it to remove simple words like that that I already but decided against it before I started removing prepositions. I suppose I can update it from the original list and reinclude them but it's probably not necessary.

On single-word flashcards, I agree to an extent. Without audio (especially for a language like Irish), they are next to worthless. With audio and a picture, they can be much more useful for expanding your vocabulary quickly when you first start learning a language. I've been doing the Duolingo Irish course for 6-7 months now (along with a few books) but I really feel like my poor vocabulary is holding me back.

In my opinion and experience, the best way to expand your vocabulary in a new language is to use high quality flashcards (with audio and a picture to supplement the words) and do the flashcards in both directions (English-to-other and other-to-English). But this alone isn't good enough. I also like to take my new vocabulary words and write a sentence or two with them. This not only reinforces the vocabulary by putting into a context (and a context that is specific to you, since you wrote it), but it also forces you to look up other words along the way to construct a complete thought. When I was learning Spanish in school, our teacher forced us to write sentences every week and I found this to be the most useful activity for making new words stick and I still use it for Spanish and now Irish.

Once you've got a few thousand vocab words under your belt, then I think it is better to ease off on the flashcards and focus on learning new vocab in context. I'm probably at a high B1 level in Spanish now and what I have done for the past couple months is use a grammar book and turn the grammar exercise sentences into Anki flashcards. That deck has almost 2000 sentences in it at this point. Practicing that deck not only reinforces the grammar every day but any words that were new when I first read that sentence are reinforced as well.

To make this long story longer, I started taking this last approach using a few Irish grammar workbooks I found but I was struggling to get the cards right, even after seeing them several times, not because I didn't understand the grammar point the sentence was trying to get across but simply because I didn't have the necessary vocabulary to understand the sentence. So I decided that for Irish, which is still a very new language for me, I needed to step back and massively expand my vocabulary before I went too much further.

TL;DR : Quality vocabulary flashcards can be great when combined with other activities to reinforce the words and they are especially useful early on in learning a language but should gradually be replaced by in-context review of vocab and grammar together.

2 years ago