https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jacob_sangi

Proggettu : U Sicilianu (Project: Sicilian)

Bonasira a tutti. Ora, jo aiu vulutu fari u post cicustanti u sicilianu, n'ngrisi, ccà su Duolingo . Spiraru si divirta e grazzii pi lettura :)

-Translation: Good afternoon Everyone. Now, I have wanted to make a post surrounding Sicilian,in English, here on Duolingo.. I hope you enjoy and thanks for reading!

Thank you everyone for tuning into this post. I have come here to promote a famous language known in Sicily as Sicilian. Spoken by over 5 million speakers, this language is one of the main dialects of the southern Italian region. I'm going to call it a dialect for the time being for the sake of less arguments surrounding this language.

There are plenty of ways in which a person could easily acquire some knowledge about the Sicilian language and where to start speaking immediately.

Facebook Groups:

  • Parra Sulu Sicilianu Although this group is meant for people only to Speak Sicilian, there are plenty of experienced and helpful individuals who will guide you to understanding the meaning of the language.*

  • The Sicilian Republic This group is a great start to learning the language. We have individuals who post 24/7 all types of memes and fun videos in Sicilian for you to keep track of learning.

There are other groups out there, but the authenticity or the lack of real knowledge of Sicilian bothers me, and thus, I chose not to post them here.

Music:

  • Eh Cumpari Translating the title to mean "Hey friend" (or buddy), this easy to follow song is catchy and a classic Sicilian song sung by a Sicilian-American.

  • Brucia la terra Translated to mean "The earth burns", this classic Sicilian song; already translated into English for people to follow along and maybe attempt to sing along.

The Sicilian language is not only influential in popular music and also spreading fast in Facebook, we're starting to see a common request for Sicilian on Duolingo.

The main reason I made this post into the Italian from English forums, is to attract more attention for the Sicilian for Italian speakers course. I wish for English speakers, but I realize that Italian speakers have a much greater need for the course.

If you would like to learn some basic phrases for the time being, I have a post I made about greetings and such: Click Here

It may be a while before I decide to chip in an application, due to school and work. However, for the rest of you Duolingo users, I purpose a rather intriguing offer for the time being. Thank you for your time. I will be updating this if more information precedes.

May 16, 2016

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/paulrausch

There have been a few rather well written basic lessons on Sicilian posted here. As well as there is now a Facebook group with 370 members supporting Sicilian language on Duolingo. How do we effectively organise ourselves to properly promote our language and raise attention? We are actually a fairly large language with over 5 million speakers, but for socioeconomic and political reasons we face some large hurdles.

May 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/evalatifa

What's the name of the Facebook group, Paul? I know many passionate Sicilian speakers who want this too.

May 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/paulrausch

https://www.facebook.com/groups/2026500664241670/

It's currently closed, just apply and I'll accept you. You can also add me or message me on facebook. We're trying to keep only passionate supporters in the group so we can maintain focus.

May 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheShep

Hahah man, your Sicilian reminds me of the one spoken by my grandparents...I take it your family comes from somewhere near Palermo, don't they? That's where "jo" is actually used to say "I", I don't really use it, I say "iu" or "ju" (doesn't really matter how you write it). Nice skills btw. Anyway I'd say that this way: Bonasera a tutti. Ora, iu a vulutu fari nu post supra u sicilianu, n'inglesi, ccà ni Duolingo. Speru ca vi piaci e grazzii r'avilla liggiuta. (Last part was a little bit complicated, since we don't have an exact translation for "thank you for reading" in Italian...same for Sicilian)

May 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jacob_sangi

Yeah, that's what I get for living with my grandparents! Haha, thanks. Yeah, near carini, Palermo. It's strange how the dialects are so different in writing, and speech, haha.

May 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/paulrausch

Natively do you say Carina? Following the occasional Sicilian O --> A pluralisation?

May 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jacob_sangi

Yes, Carina is more common to say.

May 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/paulrausch

Our Village's Sicilian name also differs widely from the Italian. San Biagio Platani - Samrasi.

May 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheShep

Well, as a native I know that city (even though I've never been there before) and we just call it Carini, simple as that. Fun fact "carina" is an actual word in both Sicilian and Italian...in the former it means "back" (as in "oh god my back is killing me today"); in the latter it means "pretty" or "nice".

May 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/paulrausch

This is a common problem though in Sicily. People rarely use their Sicilian language toponyms when speaking to people not from their paesi. This goes back to the Italian government's policy of putting us into a thousand 'dialects' rather than into several language groups with natural variation. There's still a huge stigma against communicating in Sicilian. Why the hell are we still using Mussolini's Agrigento instead of our native Girgenti?

May 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheShep

I don't really know, man. I've spent my entire life here and, yeah, it is true indeed that there's a big stigma against our language (I don't even call it dialect, it is so different from the standard Italian it does have its own dialects), but it comes from everywhere, anyway. I remember when I was a little kid my parents wouldn't want me to speak Sicilian...even nowadays speaking Sicilian to a stranger is considered rude and a sign of bad education...useless to say I think it's just a bunch of ❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤. Nobody teaches us Sicilian, you just learn it as you live, nobody's there telling you how to put a sentence together, you basically just happen to be able to speak it...that's why I said that it doesn't really matter how you write it, it's all about communication and making your point across as best as you can (that's just for what concerns the written part btw). Speaking of "paesi"...as a native I can tell you that we don't always use a "translation" for them, for the sole reason that many of them would sound weird; give you an example: my hometown name is "Lentini", it was a Greek colony (so happy about this background)...I call it "Lintini" because it fits good with the language "melody"; but let's take another city from up north like "Firenze"...now, the Sicilian for it would be "Firenzi", but I can assure you that I personally would never call it that way, I just call it with its original name or, at best, I'd drop the last letter. Man, Sicilian is hard lol.

May 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/paulrausch

@TheShep, Would you be available to talk to me at some point in private message? I've been studying minority languages and linguistics since I was a teenager. A lot of it because all of the dynamics you're describing, I remember growing up in a Sicilian speaking household and seeing so many things that didn't 'make sense'. Why do certain things 'Sound weird', why do we say we speak a 'dialect', but I can't understand Rai? Why do we have a different word for the paese than the official name? Why is my grandmother illiterate? Why is my uncle's name written in Spanish (Reina) when we say Riina? You mentioned the phrase "I don't know, man". I can tell you finally after about 10 years of study, what happened. The story of Sicily and Sicilian language is probably one of the most enlightening things that I could have ever had the privilege to have to learn about. Are you familiar with code-switching?

May 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheShep

Code-switching? Isn't it that thing you do when you keep on switching between two languages as you speak? Because if it's so...yeah, I'm quite familiar with it and I basically do it every single day when I try to illustrate complicated stuff to my parents or just people in general. Oh and I also do that because I think it makes me look incredibly cool (like "Damn, look at me...I'm speaking two languages at once, ain't I a smartass?"). Anyway, yeah, it'd be cool...just I'd really appreciate it if we kept it on writing only. Y'know, I'm not really into voice messages nor calls.

May 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/paulrausch

Hit me up on FB facebook.com/paulrausch or gchat paulrausch@gmail.com. I also have telegram/whatsapp if you prefer.

May 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/paulrausch

Hi friends! I wanted to announce to you that we've started a non-profit dedicated to Sicilian language issues. One of those is definitely something we'd all love to see, Sicilian on DuoLingo! If you're interested in learning more, please like our page: https://www.facebook.com/cademiasiciliana/ and if you have any linguistics or activism training as well, please reach out to me directly! thanks :-D

December 30, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/forcola55

Thank you for posting Giacobbe. I really enjoyed the sing along Eh Cumpari! I will also explore sone of your other suggestions.

Ciao.

May 17, 2016
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