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"¿Qué cosa tienes en tu mochila?"

Translation:What thing do you have in your backpack?

5 years ago

179 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/JoshFisher

Elizabeth, "Remember, we decided that we had to bring seven things to the picnic." Don, "We still need to gather six of them, I have one in my rucksack." Elizabeth, "What thing do you have in your rucksack? And why are you using that weird word, you're not British."

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

I'm not quite sure what this discussion is about. I believe some previous messages may be gone. However, it it important to point out that the word "pack" is often used for what DL calls "backpack", and what the British call "rucksack."

It's unfortunate that DL does not accept "pack" as a translation for "mochila" . I have reported this more than once.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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But Pack means so many other things. A pack of cigarettes, a pack of wolves, a pack of cards. But backpack is much more specific. Rucksack is a word used in American English as well, although it refers more to a longer item with a metal frame for long treks. Backpack is the smaller one which started being used by students and the like in the late sixties, although they were mostly army surplus then.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

It is true that "pack" can refer to different things. , But in the US., "pack" is very common for "backpack." And people who backpack don't confuse "pack of cards" or "pack of wolves." (wolf pack) with a backpack. In the context of hiking, "pack" refers to "backpack" and not to "pack of wolves", and most backpackers in the wilderness do not smoke.

"Pack" is also a verb -- one "packs" a bag to travel, or I pack my pack before going backpacking or hiking.

I started actively 'backpacking" with my backpack back in the 70s. I would carry a week or more of food on my back. It was not small. (I also used a smaller pack to carry my books when I was in college.)

"The Complete Backpacker" (by Colin Fletcher) became the "bible" of backpacking in the 70s. It was written for those who wanted to go on extended trips into the backcountry (wilderness). He did many very long backpack trips in the U.S., and wrote several books about his backpacking experiences. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colin_Fletcher

Here are references: https://www.backpacker.com/ (Backpacker Magazine) Look at this Backpacker Magazine website.

See this list of backpacks for sale at a major Outoor store (REI): Note the use of the word "pack" on this REI website: https://www.rei.com/c/hiking-backpacks?r=corigin=webir=category%3Ahiking-backpackspage=1

This store also specializes in backpacking. http://frugalbackpacker.com/

Backpacks come in different sizes. Often, the smaller packs are called "day packs." See this website: http://www.cabelas.com/category/Backpacks-Bags/104758380.uts

This U.S. company's site uses mostly the term "pack", for all sizes of packs. http://blackdiamondequipment.com/en_US/search?cgid=packs Search on this site with the word "rucksack", and it will turn up only "packs", not rucksacks. (although it obviously knows that a rucksack is.) It sells many different kinds of "packs", but apparently nothing they call a "rucksack."

On U.S. store websites, the backpacks are not called "rucksacks". Rucksack is a British term. (and I suppose countries such as Canada, and Australia, and other British Commonwealth countries.) It is also more common in Europe, and the term used by European companies.

"Rucksack" is also a term often used by the military. "Ruck" comes from the German for "back" . In the early 20th century, Germans were leaders in mountaineering.

Here is a review of packs (done by backpackers) https://www.backpacker.com/gear/backpacks

This site reviews packs also. They distinguish "backpack packs" from other packs. http://www.outdoorgearlab.com/topics/camping-and-hiking/best-backpacks-backpacking

Here is a list of U.S. backpacking books at Amazon. (It's not called "rucksacking.") Notice that the backpacks on the covers of the books are mostly large packs, as they are used for multi-day trips in the wilderness. https://www.amazon.com/s/?ie=UTF8keywords=backpacking+bookstag=googhydr-20index=apshvadid=181852379910hvpos=1t2hvnetw=shvrand=15131984631548488548hvpone=hvptwo=hvqmt=ehvdev=chvdvcmdl=hvlocint=hvlocphy=9006822hvtargid=kwd-526973061ref=pd_sl_3dovwxf4zs_e_p19

This site on how to choose backpacks calls them both "pack" and "backpack". Those terms are pretty much interchangeable. https://www.rei.com/learn/expert-advice/backpack.html And it is clear that this site is not talking about wolf packs, or cigarette packs.

If only DL would understand this.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Be all that as it may be (and I am aware of the origin of rucksack as a speaker of German) There is nothing in this sentence that suggests that it is about backpacking (which would never be called packing) EXCEPT the word mochila. Many students here rely on Duo for the meaning of words. Since mochila is always a good translation for backpack but often not for pack, preferring a translation that will always be correct is better on Duo which seldom has sufficient context to determine setting or situation.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

The word that suggests "pack" or "backpack" is mochila, because Spanish uses the word "mochila" to refer to what we, in the US. (and U.S. manufacturers of "mochilas") call either/both "pack" or "backpack."

The point is that, at least in the U.S., what DL will refer to as "mochila" is a "pack" or a "backpack".

"Pack" is a correct translation of "mochila" . "Backpack" is not the only correct translation of "mochila."

See this Spanish website below: All these are called "packs" in U.S. English, (or backpacks) (except a very few of them are "duffles" .) "Pack" is the standard word, in U.S. English, for what this site calls "mochilas"

https://www.google.es/search?tbm=ischq=mochilachips=q:mochila,online_chips:deportessa=Xved=0ahUKEwj_uKPgw5HXAhWk3YMKHXKdCvoQ4lYIJygBbiw=1023bih=876dpr=1

Notice: this Spanish website that sells REI packs (packs made by REI, an American company). The company REI calls them "packs". (read the lables on the packs). Spanish uses the word "mochila" to refer to REI's "packs."

https://www.google.es/search?tbm=ischq=mochilachips=q:mochila,online_chips:mochila+basicsa=Xved=0ahUKEwik4vjEw5HXAhWMwYMKHSNPDYkQ4lYIKSgDbiw=1023bih=876dpr=1#imgrc=JHl1R8ZWqgs8YM: This is a "backpack", also called a "pack."

Apparently the Spanish for a "backpacking pack ("backpack", aka "pack" ) is called "mochila de mochilero " or "mochila de campismo.

https://articulo.mercadolibre.com.mx/MLM-550520698-mochila-de-campismo-de-lujo-60-l-varios-colores-envio-gratis-_JM

https://www.google.es/search?biw=1023bih=876tbm=ischsa=1ei=pofzWaT3JYyDjwSjnrXICAq=mochila+REIoq=mochila+REIgs_l=psy-ab.3..0i30k1j0i8i30k1.1668.4184.0.4721.6.5.1.0.0.0.139.542.3j2.5.0....0...1.1.64.psy-ab..0.6.546...0.0.vu8LkCanh5c#imgrc=87KhvQ-v-J6kPM:

If I want to distinguish, in English, between types of packs, I can say "backpacking pack" and "day pack." "Day packs" are smaller packs. See this website: https://www.rei.com/c/day-packs?r=corigin=webir=category%3Aday-packspage=1

https://articulo.mercadolibre.com.mx/MLM-544795696-mochila-rei-flash-22-lt-_JM Read the lable that is in English.

Notice that, on this site, all the "daypacks" are called simply "packs;" They are NOT called "backpacks."

If only DL would get that right!

And of course, anyone can do their own research to confirm what I am saying. It's easy to do, because there are so many examples of "packs" on the web. Literally, millions of examples. (22 million for "day pack" https://www.google.com/search?q=day+packrlz=1C1FLDB_enUS563US565oq=day+packaqs=chrome..69i57j0l5.3064j0j8sourceid=chromeie=UTF-8

Here are some more sites to prove my point: -- they are called "packs"

https://www.ospreypacks.com/us/en/category/packs-and-bags/

http://www.thesaurus.com/browse/pack

https://www.moosejaw.com/moosejaw/shop/search_Multi-Day-Packs____?ad_id=Googlecm_mmc=PPC

https://www.backcountry.com/backpacking-packs

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DivingPro380218

Could be fanny pack!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

At least Google translate can get this correct, even if DL can't. https://translate.google.com/#en/es/pack

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/annierose5000
annierose5000
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they marked me wrong for saying "do you have" - they insist on "have you got" -- duo speaks its own version of English

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

It accepts "do you have" -- see the top of this page.
However, elsewhere, I did have the same concern-- it would not let me say "have" and insisted on "got."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/belindablu2

Agreed, but I suppose it doesn't do to be too dogmatic. And it does seem to be American run?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Krizzards
Krizzards
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I still wouldn't say "what thing," I'd say which one. This is not a natural English sentence.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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I agree. But I suspect it is a similarly strange sentence in Spanish. It certainly is not a common expression so it doesn't really qualify for a common for common translation. And the problem is without context it is hard to determine what would really be intended. It could well be that it is more like What's that/what sort of thing us that meaning you don't recognize the object or its purpose. But ultimately Duo's purpose is not really to teach you how to translate smoothly or eloquently into English, but rather to both construct and understand Spanish sentences. You will probably never want to construct this sentence, but understanding the elements, you will be able to correctly understand it in context.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Krizzards
Krizzards
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I think there needs to be a clarification of Duo's purpose. In these comments, I have heard both arguments. That one must use the correct English phrase and that one must translate more "word for word" to show you understand the Spanish. I have had answers marked wrong due to poor English grammar that did the best to explain the Spanish phrase and equally marked wrong when I wrote the English in best English grammar when it was not a direct translation of the Spanish phrase. I find myself struggling at times to guess which way Duo would like me to translate each answer - best English grammar? or most direct translation? Feels random at times and it would be helpful if they consistently attempted to follow one way.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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My experience is that Duo would like us to answer in a natural way. Sometimes it seems as though it's looking for a word-for-word translation, but that's more due to the way it tries to suggest a correct sentence that's similar to what we guessed wrong with. Sometimes that results in near nonsense, so it's best to go into the discussion to see what the official correct answer is.

As long as we don't worry too much about getting a wrong answer sometimes, I think it's best to aim for the most natural way to say something. If the best way to say something is a true paraphrase of the official answer, report that it's not accepted. Often they will add it to the list of accepted answers.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Robert447571

I've tried to google it, but I can't find it. Could you please tell me where is it from?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

A que refiere "it". ?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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Creo que es la conversación (imaginaria?) que JoshFisher citó entre Elizabeth y Don.

Si es imaginaria, creo que ella diría "which thing", no "what thing".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BAMR03

Lol

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mishami

even though I know that cosa means thing, Duolingo gave the meaning of que cosa as what a mess???

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dtmedic
dtmedic
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Yes, I used "What a mess you have in your backpack" but I guess that's a statement not a question...I got it wrong. LOL

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/poesraven1984

I put something like "what kind of mess do you have in your backpack?" As though I were chastising a small child for filling their bag with, say, playground sand, glitter and glue. :p

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

I wrote, "what things..." and DL accepted it. June, 2017

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
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Thank you for reporting that here. I instinctively wrote "things" then grudgingly went back to remove my "s".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lyt50
lyt50
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"what do you have in your backpack?" was accepted too - August, 2017

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

too bad they won't accept "pack". "Pack" is standard American English for "backpack."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brigid
Brigid
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A different American perspective:

It may be "standard" amongst serious hikers...but as a non-hiking American who has lived in multiple different states, I would never use "pack" for "backpack."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jonesnori

Interesting. I don't hike but I habitually say "pack" as short for "backpack". Metro NYC.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Huysan
Huysan
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I agree, mess should be the third definition and thing should be first definition. That's not what I see when I hover over the world

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/James526262

Agreed. And I certainly wouldn't risk not agreeing with someone that is hovering over the WORLD. Please don't hurt me.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sdtrask1
sdtrask1
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Hahaha. Thank you. And, admittedly, hovering over the world gives one a better perspective.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FLchick
FLchick
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Hovering over the World...must be an angel!!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ArunavaC

Please suggest this to Duo.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/babzbooks

I agree, did the same thing

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ellie871633

I found that it makes a lot more sense if you don't look at the defenitions and just work out the sentence word by word.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/anomalousjack

I agree... very strongly! In fact, if you dropdown the dropdown you see it also offers 'cosa' as the subjunctive present and imperative forms of 'to sew/to stitch' but would you try that? No! Why? Because it's the least obvious solution and makes the most sense. As FLchick say below, 'what mess' is simply idiomatic

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joyful_1

Exactly my issue

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FLchick
FLchick
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I wonder if que cosa as what a mess hint is misleading altogether or like an idiomatic saying? In the South we might ask a car driver to "crack the window" but what it means is to roll down the window a little bit.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LukeT.exe

I know its stupid

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pesekt
pesekt
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what about: "What do you have in your backpack?"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nopnsoap

it was accepted now

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AchilleTal

Confirmed, it is accepted.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jarppis44

No, it was not.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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I tried it just now, and it was accepted. Maybe you made some little mistake that you didn't notice.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pavelnikolov
pavelnikolov
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I also answered "What do you have in your backpack?" and it was not accepted. Again we had to go for literal translation. And other times the literal translation is not accepted. : (

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ConaireMor
ConaireMor
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Lol it's so inconsistent sometimes. But it's still a work in progress so I just hope they're working on this.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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I gave that exact answer and it was accepted. The power of reporting ...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/reedm02

I answered "what thing do you have in your backpack." In the interest of literal translation... it was accepted

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Phil46

Makes hard work of simple stuff and the time wasting !!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RichJustis77

hold up. It was not. I just got it wrong

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vicki.kura

Remember that these discussion boards are for several different versions of this. One may have got "translate to English" the other "translate to Spanish". Please keep reporting when you come across these.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brigid
Brigid
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In addition, one should check the "time stamp" for Discussion entries. ;-)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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I agree that the time stamp is significant. But when I use the phone or tablet app, I don't see the time stamp. Only when I click on the link in an email update do I see it.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SaulM

I understand this is a literal translation, but in Spanish is the cosa needed? Would the sentence still sound okay without it?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndreasWitnstein
AndreasWitnstein
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Yes, ‘¿Qué tienes en tu mochila?’ is a perfectly fine sentence, and one you'd be much more likely to hear in general.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joshua6261

in what circumstances would cosa be used?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FLchick
FLchick
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Use cosa when you can't ask "What the "H E Double Hockey Sticks" do you have in your backpack?"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elanorigby
elanorigby
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Does the context of this sentence in spanish include the possibility of multiple things, even though it's not expressly stated? It makes a lot more sense to be asking what things or stuff someone has in their backpack. Perhaps that's part of the "what mess" thing. If this is true, then "what stuff do you have in your backpack should be accepted.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndreasWitnstein
AndreasWitnstein
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‘¿Qué cosa tienes en tu mochila?’ is asking for the identification of what appears to be a single object, although it might turn out to be more than one object, and there could certainly be other objects in the backpack that aren't arousing the questioner's curiosity. It's what you would ask if it looks like there's a strange object in the backpack —maybe there's something unrecognizable protruding from it, or some unidentified gizmo shows up in a security scanner. An idiomatic English translation is “What's that thing in your backpack?”. But just as “What thing is in your backpack?” sounds awkward in English, ‘¿Qué es esa cosa en tu mochila?’ sounds awkward in Spanish.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vicki.kura

Thank you. That is what I was wondering. I've felt almost all of their sentences using "thing" sound awkward.

Have a lingo.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/davidllm

Super explanation - thanks.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SusieY

Although the word 'cosa' remains in the sentence, when I entered 'What things ...' it was accepted.

[I have seen 'Cosas' translated as 'belongings' and 'stuff'! Both of these fit the 'backpack' question.]

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jimijimmy

Why doesn't it accept "What is in your backpack?" I know that I didn't literally translate, but it means the same thing and is more natural to say than "What thing do you have in your backpack"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Phil46

I agree but its just a way of trying out the words some of it is funny a bit confusing but read a bit of book stuff to back it up and you will progress fast!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AmericanLyon

"Bomb", "cellphone", and "ruler" were among options to choose from. What are you insinuating, Duolingo?!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BollockBocculus

What thing do you have in your backpack? - is not good english!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/membernumber13

it's not "bad english" it's just a phrase that no one would ever use. it is more likely to ask "what things are" in your backpack.

an example of a context in which this phrase might be appropriate:

guy 1: i have a thing in my backpack. guy 2: what thing do you have in your backpack?

the exercise is designed to help us practice the word "cosa", not just "que tienes". i agree it is a clumsy weird phrase to use but sometimes i think the examples are ridiculous on purpose to make us pay extra attention to things like sentence structure and appropriate translation.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BollockBocculus

Thanks number 13 :)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/miettasmom

Uhhh, why is Que Cosa only translated as "what a mess" or "what a situation"? That's all kinds of messed up, man. Guess I was supposed to be psychic to figure this one out.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kenaxo
kenaxo
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Because...¡Qué cosa! is an interjection that is used when we might say, "What a mess! That´s crazy! or more colorful terms. I remember distinctly a Mexican saying once, "¡Qué cosa más grande!" It did NOT mean "what a big thing."

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ejgrimley
ejgrimley
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Seconding kenaxo, but I will add that a good (casual) translation for "qué cosa" might be "what the heck?" This phrase is also used as a catch-all to clear up confusion. So if I mumble, a Panamanian may ask, "qué cosa hija?" to get me to repeat myself

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/miettasmom

Oh, NOW in the next lesson I get the definition of Cosa. A little out of order there, DuoLingo!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Majestic546

I answered what thing do you have in your backpack and was marked incorrect, confused

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/laurel541478
laurel541478
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Because that's the way they say it in spanish. If they translated it word for word it would be more confusing because it would have no meaning for us. What thing! We don't say that so they tell us it means what a mess or something that makes sense to us. But it does make it hard when we can see the words don't mean that. However, when you get more fluent you do know what the words really mean and can see the correlation. Sorry for the long post

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Len_H
Len_H
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Would what "items" do you have in your backpack also be correct, thank you

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndreasWitnstein
AndreasWitnstein
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I assume you mean the singular, “item”. An “item” is usually one of a coherent list, so “What item do you have in your backpack?” would make sense if you're in a group each of which is carrying one item from a checklist in their backpack.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JanKovacic

Does anyone else love the way how she says "mochila"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/darkforceyoda

Thing people say before they mug you....survey says!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Diane-Plaza

I had "What else do you have in your backpack" and was marked incorrect. I thought cosa can also mean else?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndreasWitnstein
AndreasWitnstein
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That would be ‘¿Qué otra cosa tienes en tu mochila?’ = “What other thing do you have in your backpack?” or ‘¿Qué más tienes en tu mochila?’ = “What more do you have in your backpack?”; ‘cosa’ doesn't mean “else”.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Diane-Plaza

Ok cool, thanks!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Metlieb
Metlieb
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I said "what do you have INSIDE your backpack?" Shouldn't this be accepted, too?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndreasWitnstein
AndreasWitnstein
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That would be ‘dentro de tu mochila’.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sonialong24

i hovered over the words and found it said 'what a situation'. i was confused but i knew that other times when i typed in exactly what it SAID it meant was untrue. so I just guessed 'what do you have in your backpack' and luckily it was right. other times i have not been so fortunate.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JonathanMo310293

the soloution provided says "thing you've in your..." its bad english. you should only use 'you've' for the 'haber' version of have, not the 'tener'. it should say 'you have'

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dina_alsaiid

Why it is saying bookbag!!!!!!!!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rob964553
Rob964553Plus
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What thing have you in your backpack is another way to say this sentence and therefore I should get the points..

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rob964553
Rob964553Plus
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I'm not sure you'd say "what thing" you're more likely to say "what do you have in your rucksack"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/logotha
logotha
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What thing have you in your backpack? Surely that should be a yes!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rdssle

Rucksack?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kasperbow

What do you have in your backpack? Correct english sentence

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SeijaSariola0

I agree

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/E92503

For some stupid reason I said "What thing do you have in your BAGpack" instead of "backpack", I think I'm losing my English skills

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/miza713

"What is in your backpack?" is not accepted. I guess they want you to specify that the thing in the backpack specifically belongs to the owner or the backpack, but that seems a bit nitpicky to me.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mdd07c

Does "que cosa" ever really translate to "what a mess"? If not, DL needs to get rid of that suggestion. I can't find that translation anywhere, and I lost a lingot.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vicki.kura

Please see kenaxo's comment above.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hazel60

I translated the literally and I got it incorrect. Looking at the correct translation it was the same as mine. So why was mine wrong?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hello_world_hola

Unless you copy your translation and paste it in your comment, we can't really help. It may have been a typo, or a glitch, or something else, but there's no way for us to know if you don't show us exactly what you entered.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ahmad_Afiq

Exactly mishami

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StephanieCane

Rucksack is not a word Americans use basically ever.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jenn2222

Well since I am Dora the Explorer, I have many things.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jonesnori

"Pack" should have been an okay translation for "mochila". It's used more often that the full-length "backpack", at least in the circles I run in.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/debusscs

I'm here because i was curious how such an easy answer has 66 comments. It might help to remember that usually DL gives the meanings they're looking for first. Don't try to get creative with your answers and don't over think it. You will won't sound like a native speaker by learning any language with an app. However you can learn enough of the language to catch on to common usage really fast. So just concentrate on what an app can do for you.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mateoelmartillo

Shouldn't "What's in your backpack?" work here? Especially if the correct translation returned was "What do you've in your backpack?" Nobody says that...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kappers
kappers
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"What does it have in its pocketses, precious?"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mathias255486

One of many things Dora never taught me how to say in spanish

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stevofrost99

What has it got in its pocketses?!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chrisfriberg

No such word as book bag in english mochila is school bag or rucksack

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/debusscs

I disagree. This is regional, and book bag is a common term in some places.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FLchick
FLchick
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chris, I had a book bag in elementary school; it was plaid and had a handle. It was not a backpack.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chrisfriberg

Backpack is American in English it is rucksack

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bridget758934

you now long i am trying to pass a certain phase in this lesson and you guys are gaving me hell what is really going on

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jlionel46

Don't need got

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnHale12
JohnHale12
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What is a packsack? That not an actual English word in actual usage as far as i know.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BlackRue
BlackRue
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Singular thing sounds weird in English. What things do you have in your backpack? Is more common

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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If asking about all the things in the backpack, "What do you have in your backpack" is even more common. Using "things" seems a bit awkward.

But I think this is asking about a particular thing, so "What's that thing in your backpack" seems the most natural to me.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CherylW.3
CherylW.3
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Rucksack? Are we trying to bring the word into the vernacular?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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It already is in the vernacular in some places.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CherylW.3
CherylW.3
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My answer wrong. Listed as right - What you've in your backpack?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CherylW.3
CherylW.3
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"What do you've" actually.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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It's tricky for non-native speakers to know when it's not ok to use contractions in English. One easy case is when they end a sentence (can't do "He is as smart as I'm"). But I wouldn't know how to explain why "what do you've in your backpack" is wrong.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jnit3
Jnit3
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Is cosa, thing and cosas, things?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nathan367048

Ok why is it that maleta = rucksack but on every other question it has told me it's suitcase. It just seems a little irregular

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Madamjaj1

Rugsack who even says that!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/poopybum

Wouldn't "what thing in is your backpack" be acceptable?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElAitch

I like how the options for words to put in the sentence included "weapon" and "bomb" as if duo is trying to trick an evildoer into actially answering the question!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lucas914895

"what thing do you have in your bag"... that doesn't even sound right, but okay.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/indra1081

Who translates these, I said: what's in your backpack, their translation was: what thing do y'ave in your backpack. Duolingos translation makes no sense as you would never say it like tgst but mine is wrong

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sjordan1231

I typed in "what thing do you have in your backpack?" and it says the correct answer is "what thing do you have in your rucksack" What is a rucksack???

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/miss0n1

Why does bag pack need to be one word

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/samg297989

They might ask you this question at the Aeropuerto

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/annierose5000
annierose5000
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but duo tells me I missed the word, "got" -- which word would that be?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/belindablu2

"What thing have you in your backpack" should be seen as correct. "Got" is otiose and used to be considered bad style. "Do you have" is fine, but "have you" equally so.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RauleEstobar

. . . . Using the word 'got', is bad English.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidYates19

I put, What thing do you have on your backpack? And it was marked wrong.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/qiu28p

'What thing have you in your backpack' is the same meaning

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nathalie107050

An english typo is not the same as a wrong word. I am not native English, I try to learn Spanish here, so I focus on the Spanish, not the English. (what to you have in your backpack)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kasperbow

This is not a correct english sentence, the word thing is not needed.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AngeliqueBouchet
AngeliqueBouchet
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Is there any difference between "¿QUÉ cosa tienes en tu mochila?" and "CUÁL cosa tienes en tu mochila?" ? Or can we use any to express the same thing? Thanks.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/anomalousjack

The differences are subtle and both could be used here. However, in many cases qué could be seen to be closer to 'what', while cuál is closer to 'which'. For instance, this is how I would use the two...

'¿Qué cosa tienes en tu mochila?' = What do you have in your backpack? (I don't have any idea!)

'¿Cuál cosa tienes en tu mochila, la negra o la blanca?' = which thing do you have in your backpack, the black one or the white?' (I know you have one, but 'which' one did you bring?)

Also, cuál can be made into a plural; qué cannot...

'Cuales cosas tienes...' 'Qué cosas tienes...'

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/anomalousjack

Here's another example I just found in the next Duo section, Education...

¿¿Cuál es tu nivel en Duolingo?? = (I know you are at a level but...) Which level are you at in Duolingo?

¡Solo estoy en el nivel once! :(

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AngeliqueBouchet
AngeliqueBouchet
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Thanks a lot! That makes perfect sense now! ¡Muchas gracias! :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Xn3K6Plw

things are plural so are is the correct word, not is

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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But the answer should be "thing", to match "cosa", singular, so "is" is the correct word.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/qiu28p

It didn't accept that phrasing on my programme.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nicky462288

You don't need the word 'thing' in this sentence. Just 'what do you have' is correct. 'Thing' is understood

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PGiUV

To often I have failed a lesson because I accidentally only typed "you" instead of "your." I know these are very different words, but I think this should just be a "typo" not a cause for getting the entire question wrong.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoanCritch

Got is not correct English,bad grammar.my translation is correct......

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sophia_nutall

DL says "what things is in your backpack is correct"- Agust 13, 2017

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/evergreen7doves

Why couldn't you say "Que tienes en tu mochila?' or "what is in your backpack?" In other words, why exactly does cosa have to be included?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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You don't "have to" But both the Spanish and the English does.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DivingPro380218

"What have you in your backpack" not accepted?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Not common usage. The only verb that is commonly used in a question without the auxiliary verb in modern American English is to do. To have does manage to come in from time to time without sounding too archaic, but it does tend to turn into that horrid construction Have you got. If you try simply reversing other verbs and pronouns, it tends to make people miss the Thou form as in What thinkest thou.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Angelic180558

I question your word for backpack. The word you used have not been introduced and I am on my second go round with this course.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnRobert60

Where does got come into it !

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Horrible but common American English construction that tends to happen when people simply reverse the subject pronoun and the verb with the verb to have. What have you tends to becomes what have you got. But if you say What do you have, that got goes away.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Unknown986874

Can you put tu between cosas and tienes?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Since you didn't use the tilde, I am not quite sure what you are asking. If you are asking if one could also ask ¿Que cosa tienes tú en tu mochila? the answer is yes It is never incorrect to use Subject pronouns, although in cases like this where tienes could only refer to a tú, it would probably not be used by native speakers except in a conversation about what various people put in their backpacks. But the tu before mochila is the possessive adjective and cannot be moved

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bigwig40
Bigwig40Plus
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I got it right because I know that DL prefers a literal translation, but "What do you have in your rucksack ?" would sound more natural in English.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/williamalva

Thats the last time you will make fun of me *pulls out Ak from backpack

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alexisandm1

"Qué cosa tienes en tu mochila?" says boots

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarryStaley

Cosas=stuff

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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I always hated the word stuff, but more importantly it is a singular form for a plural meaning. Translating cosa as thing and cosas as things is more straightforward. It is interesting to me that the meaning of La Cosa Nostra from Italian is Our thing. Italian shares a lot of vocabulary with Spanish.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PegWhitman
PegWhitman
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Que cosa sounds stilted. Cosas sounds better as as I suspect one would carry many items.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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It certainly does sound strange in English. But in Spanish there is an Interjection ¡Que cosas! which means how strange or how weird which may affect the way those words are otherwise used. Of course Qué is used before a noun to mean which as well, and that would sound better in English. The problem with these sentences is that we don't always know if what sounds strange in English sounds strange in Spanish. I have seen sentences on Duo that I knew were slightly off in both languages and those where I knew it was correct in Spanish but sounded a little off in English, but I don't know the story here. I do know that you can say Qué tienes en tu mochila, so the purpose of cosa is unclear.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Juan913755

Pack should be accepted. Teach spanish not la linga americana!

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Any requests for program changes should be addressed with the flag icon. All changes will take a lot of time, but this request doesn't even get reviewed from the user discussion section.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Blas_de_Lezo00
Blas_de_Lezo00
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¿Qué cosa tienes en tu mochila? es una frase absurda. ¿Qué tienes en la mochila?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Estoy definitivamente de acuerdo. Pero, me pregunto si Duo quisiera demonstrar el uso de qué con un sustantivo en vez de cuál. Pero esa no lo demuestra bien. Me parece que, por lo general, tienen alguna razón para incluso sus frases locas, pero si funciona o no es otra pregunta enteramente. Quando comencé con Duo ya hablé un poco de los primeros idiomas que estudia. Pero después de comenzar algunos nuevos idiomas desde el principio, me di cuenta de lo difícil que era la tarea del Duo para tratar de ilustrar las reglas y características gramaticales de modelado solo. Aquellos como yo que utilizan las aplicaciones de dispositivos no tienen explicaciones gramaticales en todo el interior de Duo. Así que me paso el tiempo tratando de averiguar lo que están tratando de ilustrar. Creo que a veces los empleados del Dúo oyen por casualidad oraciones raras en la calle o en una fiesta y deciden usarlos. Pero esta oración realmente no sería usada en ninguna lengua, por tanto me aturde.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Blas_de_Lezo00
Blas_de_Lezo00
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Is it common to say in English: What thing do you have in your backpack?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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No, I don't think anybody would ever say that. It would just be "What do you have ...".

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jfkoerwer

"You have" was abbreviated "you've" in the answer given for me. Bug?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sheerluck40649
sheerluck40649
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Duo accepted knapsack! It is one I use all the time (I am from the US). Anyone else?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skjerns
skjernsPlus
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Oh, it's just a FireFox!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nhf4XEhbKmfn34ET

Suitcase should be accepted

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndreasWitnstein
AndreasWitnstein
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"suitcase"=‘maleta’; ‘mochila’ never means “suitcase.”.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FLchick
FLchick
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While you can use a bacpack or rucksack as a suitcase they are not the same thing as a suitcase.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/edominguez031

Something.

3 years ago