https://www.duolingo.com/MaluPeCe

Erkek and adam

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Erkek and adam are synonyms? Or is there a difference?

2 years ago

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/alHadzya
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Merhaba Maria! :) It's a matter of formal vs. informal. Erkek (man) is often used in formal sense with a sign of respect for that gender and Adam (guy) as the male informal synonym. Also, 'Erkek' derives from the Turkish word 'erk' for 'power' or 'strength' and in some instances 'ability,' thus it's formal connotation in it's respectful sense. Also, there is an expression in Turkey, 'erkek adam'. Said together it means, "The real man". :) The culture is fairly patriarchal, though this strong sense comes from early stages of the building of the modern republic and much has changed... for the better :) I hope you will have enjoyed my explanation for the two with a little bit of culture thrown in :) Öğrenme tadını çıkarın! Allahaısmarladık :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mkarabiy

I do not understand where you got the idea, but erkek/adam difference has absolutely nothing to do with formality. Formal ways of addresing would be bay/bey/beyefendi. I must add that your cultural clarification is as valid as your vocabulary explanation. Sorry if I sound contentious, but your post needed corrections.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alHadzya
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Do you have a clarification or this is just another topic you're looking to argue with someone? "Bay/bey/beyefendi" are titles and nowhere in my explanation do I talk about titles. In the English language, when a male is referred to as a man, his masculinity and gender are respected at a degree higher than when he is referred to as a guy. A good example of using adam over erkek as a diminutive is in an argument when directly facing opposite a man. The same is true in Turkish and other languages. This is where the formal vs informal sense comes from. Have a nice day.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mkarabiy

I do not understand why you insist. You do not know Turkish well enough obviously, wouldn't it make much more sense to learn from native speakers rather than arguing with them? Nothing you wrote about Turkish above is correct. Erkek's closest translation would be male. It is not formal, otherwise people would not use it for animals. Formal versions would be the words I wrote,

"I saw a man = bir bay/bey/beyefendi gördüm (formal) bir adam gördüm (informal)

no one says "bir erkek gördüm", because it is strange ( I saw a male).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MeteUlku
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I agree with this as a native speaker too.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/orde90
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I am a native speaker too and I don't agree with you. Bir erkek gördüm sounds totally fine to me and erkek means both male and man. However erkek is less likely to be used in the meaning of 'man' in daily language and I think that's why he says it's more formal, but that's not a very good classification (that's over simplification). I agree that there is a tendency to use erkek in more formal situations but still both adam and erkek can be used in both formal and informal language. Erkek is usually preferred as opposed to adam when you stress the gender though and this emphasis is cared about more in formal language.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alHadzya
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Orde90, I appreciate you jumping in and offering your view. In all honesty, a good Turkish dictionary fully explains the differences between the two, e.g. I use a Redhouse Yeni Elsözlüğü (1997). Linguistic registers are fluid and debatable. I think what really may have set off makarbiy is my take on Turkish culture. Just so we are clear, I'm only covering this for future readers: It actually isn't my personal take, though it is general knowledge. Aside from offering the root to 'Erkek', my take was mostly shaped by Alp Biricik's published works on gender in Turkey -- http://liu.diva-portal.org/smash/record.jsf?pid=diva2%3A265761dswid=-871 Bana göre, konu kapanmıştır. Güle güle ;)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jzlcdh
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You can use "erkek" for animals but as far as I know you cannot use "adam" for animals.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mkarabiy

Erkek emphasizes the gender. Lets say there is an option for gender in a form, it would say Erkek/Kadın. Erkek in that sense may mean the same as "man" as in "he is the man". But you would not use "erkek" for "I saw a man", because here you emphasize not the manly characters or especially gender but the act of seeing so you use "adam". If I say I saw someone, one might ask, if the person I saw was an "erkek" or a "kadın". Here the emphasis is on the gender. "erkekler ağlamaz = men don't cry" here again the emphasis is on the manly character, but if you say "adamlar ağlamaz" I would ask which particular men, whom are you talking about. Because here one does not get the manly emphasis but it just says some guys don't cry.

2 years ago
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