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"Vous avez mis vos chaussures."

Translation:You put on your shoes.

January 26, 2013

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shelagh

I would also say "You put on your shoes." This may just be a common usage. But I also feel the suggested answer "You put your shoes on" would be considered incorrect as it ends the sentence with a preposition.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/npweston

Considered incorrect by Messrs Strunk and White perhaps, but not by the vast majority of native English speakers :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/smearedink

The past form of "put" is also "put" so that should be fine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hellohammerheads

It's a particle, not a preposition...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CJ.Dennis

It doesn't matter what it's called to decide if it's good English. "You have put your shoes on" is good English, and the preposition "rule" (really a style guide) is artificial and wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/effyleven

"You have put on your shoes," also judged correct. 28 Jul '18. It's just slightly more correct as English, in my view, because splitting the "on" from the "put" seems unnecessarily clumsy. That it precisely duplicates French word order is a bonus.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Karpadam

isn't "mis" supposed to be in a plural form to agree with the shoes?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/puppy7989

Verbs conjugated with avoir only agree with a PRECEEDING direct object or PRECEEDING direct object pronoun.

Vous avez mis VOS CHAUSSURES (your shoes - the direct object - is AFTER the verb so NO AGREEMENT)

Aimez-vous LES CHAUSSURES que j'ai achetées - the direct object (les chaussures and then also"que" which refers to the shoes comes before the verb so the verb agrees)

Vous LES avez MISES (LES - the direct pronoun meaning your shoes - is BEFORE the verb, so there IS agreement = MISES)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dravard

Why is "You wore your shoes" wrong? "Wore" is a choice in the drop-down definitions.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/InvertedGo

Usually mettre = put on, and porter = wear.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/N.Rennard

Thanks for noticing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joe307563

In the "click to pick English words", there was no "have". None of the report options seemed applicable.

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