"Am faint o'r gloch mae hi eisiau cinio?"

Translation:What time does she want dinner?

May 18, 2016

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/RowenaJane

Did anyone else have difficulty with hearing 'cinio'?

May 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo

It sounds like cino to me, but I assumed that was a dialect/accent thing - I've heard -io endings sound like -o in people from the south before.

December 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/ibisc

Two things going on here:

  • As we say in a number of places, while Duo’s Welsh TTS is pretty good, it is not perfect by any means.
  • In the wild, you will often hear cinio pronounced as /cino/.
December 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Jehra2

in the wild

December 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/seanlikeskites

Is "ydy hi eisiau cinio" not right?

May 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/ibisc

Not in this context. In asking about time in this way, this sentence requires mae - one pointer to this is if the question begins with a preposition, as this one does.

bydd would also work if you wanted to convey more of a sense of future, as in 'when will she want...'

May 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/seanlikeskites

Diolch!

Although that leaves me a little confused. For this question (https://www.duolingo.com/comment/14939810) "Am faint o'r gloch rwyt ti'n codi?" is not taken as a correct answer. Instead it says to use "wyt ti'n".

If "mae" is required here, surely it should be "rwyt" there. Or is there some difference I'm not picking up on?

May 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/ibisc

That confuses me, too! In that question ... rwyt ti'n ... is the correct answer. However, the r- is frequently dropped in informal usage and so ... wyt ti'n ... would be an acceptable alternative.

The course is still in beta, though...

May 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Jehra2

is it when the sentence starts with a preposition that you use mae instead of ydy, or is it something else?

December 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/ibisc

Yes that is one of the cases when you would use mae, as here. It also follows the question words pryd?, ble?, pam?,and sut? (when it means how?). There are some other cases, too.

December 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/RowenaJane

I've never heard the infinitive of a verb called a verb-noun. The infinitive is the part of the verb which means 'to' do something. So 'start' is the noun and 'to start' is the infinite of the verb.

July 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/ibisc

Welsh does not have an infinitive in that sense. A verb-noun (berfenw) is the basic, uninflected form of a verb in Welsh. It is similar to a Latin gerund and the xxx-ing form of verbs in English. For convenience it is often translated as the equivalent of the English infinitive form 'to xxx' or as 'xxx-ing'

July 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Deyan161

I'm getting confused with when a word is a noun and when a verb. Does "cinio" only mean "dinner" or does it also mean "to dine"? Why can't one translate this sentence as "what time does she want to dine?" Help please!

June 15, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/ibisc

cinio is a true noun meaning 'lunch' or dinner'. So 'having lunch/dinner' is usually cael cinio

If ever you are unsure, just look the word up on, say, www.gweiadur.com (you need to register, but it is free) - that will list verb and noun meanings in separate paras if the word does happen to be used as both (dechrau, for example).

Similarly, if you use the 'Ap Geiriaduron' smart-phone app (it's free), that will list verb meanings with the abbreviation 'be' (for berfenw, verb-noun) and noun meanings as eg or eb (respectively enw gwrywaidd, 'masculine noun', and enw benywaidd, 'feminine noun')

(A 'verb-noun' is the basic form of a verb used to list it in a dictionary, and what we use after dw i'n ... etc.)

June 15, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Deyan161

Diolch yn fawr!

June 15, 2016
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