"Ela está ansiosa pelas férias."

Translation:She is eager for the holidays.

January 26, 2013

32 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/andreaparker

I got this one right, because I translated it literally, but have to say it doesn't mean anything in English. Would it be better translated ' is looking forward to... or can't wait for... ?

January 26, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChrisGull

I'd say "She is anxiously waiting for the holidays" if given no further context. "Anxious" seems to imply a certain negativity ("get me out of here!"), more so than "looking forward to" ("I can't wait for the holidays to start!").

March 16, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pillowpillar

"She is anxious for the holidays" sounds completely natural to me (meaning "can't wait for", yes). I'm Irish, so perhaps this is something unique to Hiberno English or more likely Hiberno English and British English?

May 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rossito1234

Hmmm, I'm British and haven't really heard this phrase used. The first impression I get from this phrase is that she is worried about the holidays for some reason...

May 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pillowpillar

Just went to see if I could find anything on this to see if it was just colloquial usage. It seems "anxious" can indeed be used like this (not just colloquially):

"ardently or earnestly wishing <anxious to learn more>" Source: Definition 3 http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/anxious

So it can work like the word "eager".

May 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rossito1234

Sure, it was just a first impression that threw me. The implied negativity of the word 'anxious' seemed out of context with the concept of going on holiday... Even in your example definition of 'anxious to learn more', I would say there is an implied negativity, in that there must be a possibility that the information they want to learn could mean something bad or serious such as "anxious to learn the results of the medical tests".

Perhaps the negativity of anxious could be understood as 'she is desperate to go on holiday'. However, from my understanding, this is not a good translation from the Portuguese, which is actually a positive statement about looking forward to the holidays...

June 5, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jedi_grrlie

You can be anxious about positive things. I'm currently completing my degree in TESOL. I'm anxious for classes to start up again in the fall. Why? Because I want to finish my degree. There's really nothing negative about this situation. I'm not going to learn anything bad in the fall. The worst thing that's happening with classes not being in session is that I'm getting impatient. "She's anxious to go on vacation" is an acceptable translation, not a bad one. Indeed, the statement may not be intended to be entirely positive; again, you can look forward to something positive and still feel a nervous energy. (It's different from saying, "I'm so excited for vacation!") If the statement was "She's anxious about her vacation," though, I would agree that she's nervous about something negative happening.

June 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gibil

This use in English is technically correct, but not really widely used. If it were, it would usually be more along the lines of 'She is anxious for the holidays to begin' or some such thing. Otherwise, as andreaparker said, it would more likely be 'She can't wait for the holidays'.

March 15, 2013

[deactivated user]

    I hate this one! I nearly always write something that DL doesn't like. This time "She is looking forward to the vacation" only to be told I should have written holidays. ( which doesn't generally mean vacation in US English!)

    June 22, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrookeLorren

    I was marked wrong for vacation too. So is she anxious about the period of time between Thanksgiving and New Years, since vacation is incorrect?

    June 14, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cazort

    I said "She is eager for vacation." without the article "the", and Duo marked it wrong, insisting it be translated: "She is eager for the vacation."

    I think it is very uncommon to use the article "the" with the word vacation in English, and I am going to report this because the translation seems a little literalistic and unnatural. I think it makes sense to accept the translation without the word "the" here.

    June 11, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/duoitaliano

    It is still marked incorrect on June 18, 2018.

    June 18, 2017

    [deactivated user]

      The point is arguable.

      June 18, 2017

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/saschambaer

      I wrote "she is anxious for the vacations" and it informed me that it was wrong because I used the plural "vacations" but it have to be in the singular. However, férias is the plural, so why would this be wrong?

      March 7, 2014

      [deactivated user]

        It's because in French you say "j'ai hâte que les vacances commencent", In American English vacation is singular, if you are talking about one trip. if you say vacations it means more than one vacation. In British English you'd say "I can't wait for the holidays" (and this in American English often means "I can't wait for (the) Christmas (holidays)"

        May 3, 2015

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChrisGull

        English has its funny moments, such as when it's okay to say "holidays" but not "vacations" when referring to one period free from work or such. You use singular for vacation, but for holiday it doesn't matter (due to its origin "holy days").

        March 16, 2014

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrookeLorren

        What if she's taking two vacations in two weeks. As in, I'm going on vacation to Maui next week, and next week I'm going on another vacation to see my brother.

        June 14, 2016

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PHScanes

        Férias is the word for one period of vacation... it's singular

        May 21, 2014

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/helen-d

        could 'ansiosa' mean 'excited' in English? i havent been able to find a portuguese equivalent to 'excited' other than maybe animada? but Ive noticed people dont seem to use that, and excitada cant be used. anyone have any idea?

        December 19, 2014

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LindaCalk

        Interesting question! Maybe the answer lies in the meaning of "excited" in English. One of its common uses in present day American English is to express the same meaning as the British "keen on doing something." The dictionary gives desejosa as a synonym for ansiosa. So, I'm not a native speaker of Portuguese, but my best guess is that you can use ansiosa to mean that you are really looking forward to something.

        December 19, 2014

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ACE117722

        why doesn't 'fairs' work?

        July 7, 2015

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KumaDeKonig

        This one trips me up too. Feria - Vacation, Holiday Feira - Festival, Fair

        October 4, 2017

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Greg_Shaw

        The “correct” translation offered by duolingo is improper, in the sense that you would not find a native speaker choosing such a sentence construction unless it had some additional clue attached to help discern the meaning. For instance, “she is anxious for the holidays to begin” would be better, because the additional information suggests that the anxiousness involved is mild and commonly accepted as a means of expressing positive energy in anticipation of having time off from the drudgery of current activities. Even in this case, the construction is still a little stilted. A better, more commonly used construction would be “She can’t wait to go on vacation.”

        The root of the problem stems from the fact that the construction “ansiosa pelas férias” in Portuguese implies an undeniably positive and possibly enviable state of being, whereas in English, the word anxious could be either positive or negative, and therefore needs further distinction to clarify the writer’s intention. One would therefore say either, for example, “vacations make her anxious” to emphasize that the person in question is experiencing real anxiety about going on vacation and therefore would prefer to postpone taking a vacation indefinitely, or, for example, “she can’t wait to take a vacation” to make it clear that the objective is to for vacation to arrive as soon as possible.

        November 5, 2014

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jedi_grrlie

        As a native speaker, I disagree. While "She can't wait to go on vacation" is far more common, if you said to me, with no other context, "She's anxious for vacation," I would understand that you meant she's waiting (presumably excitedly) for it. If you said "She's anxious about [her] vacation," I would understand that you meant she's nervous about her trip. This distinction came up on another forum for "ansioso."

        Google Translate, while it does have its limitations, gives me "ansioso por" or "para" for "anxious for" and "ansioso sobre" for "anxious about." I will check with my dad, who's Portuguese, to verify if the two structures are indeed different, meaning that "ansioso por" would correspond to "anxious for."

        June 4, 2015

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/duofus

        I suppose it is always plural in portuguese. E?

        June 22, 2014

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaaadz

        Why is for the vacations wrong? Isnt férias plural?

        July 6, 2015

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jedi_grrlie

        In Portuguese, the plural "férias" is always (as far as I know) used, but in American English the singular "vacation" is used. One language uses the plural and one uses the singular. You would only use "vacations" in English if you were talking about multiple, separate vacations - "She took three vacations last year."

        In British English, "holiday" is used more commonly. I think this would still be "She's anxious to go on holiday," but I have heard the plural "holidays" used in other instances.

        July 7, 2015

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarksAaron

        I keep wanting to translate "férias" as "break" when it comes up, since this is a common synonym for "vacation", at least in my dialect (western US). Thus this sentence could be "She is eager/excited to go on break" or "She is looking forward to the break". Could this be added as an accepted translation for "férias"?

        March 14, 2016

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ungringoperdido

        It's the use of definite articles in portuguese vs English. "She is anxious for vacation" is a better translation than the literal "she is anxious for the vacation." But Duolingo wants to be positive you understand pelas. We use so much less the than Portuguese speakers use their definite articles.

        December 14, 2017
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