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  5. "Bei der Schüssel liegt ein L…

"Bei der Schüssel liegt ein Löffel."

Translation:There is a spoon near the bowl.

January 24, 2014

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RaulFazil

Should'nt the articles be in the dative after BEI? Der schussel is in the dative, but what about ein Loffel? Shouldnt it be einem Loffel?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/binweg

No. ein Löffel is the subject of the sentence and nominative case is the correct one for it. „Ein Löffel liegt bei der Schüssel.“ is equivalent to this sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RaulFazil

alright...that settles it..thanks xD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Konrad-Michal

Why not A spoon lies at the bowl?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/quelusia1312

Why is dish incorrect?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/revmdj

I answered "a spoon lays by the bowl" and it was wrong, because the answer should have been "a spoon LIES by the bowl." Why was that wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HelcioTJ

I'm not a native English speaker, but I believe "a chicken lays eggs", while "a spoon lies on the table".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/angiedaytripper

In English..

'Lay' requires a direct object but 'lie' does not..

Lay is transitive and Lie is intransitive.

'I lay the book down on the table' (the book is the direct object)

'I lie down' (there is no direct object here, just a subject/nominative 'I'

In the DL sentence the clause is 'a spoon lies' because the spoon is the subject of the clause and not a direct object.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tolven

Does the same hold true for liegen and legen?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fenix_vulgaris

Yes, "liegen" is instransitive (no object), "legen" is transitive (with object).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tolven

Side note, is it more common in German to use liegen than sein when talking about the placement of objects? In English, I would say 'It's on the table,' but in German is it more natural to say "Es liegt auf dem Tisch"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FriedyMoss

You are right. I am German and I would rather say "es liegt auf dem Tisch". As well as "der Löffel liegt neben der Schüssel".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/heinzgenrikh

Does "bei" also mean "beside" here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fenix_vulgaris

Yes. "bei" can mean "next to" "beside"

http://dict.leo.org/#/search=bei


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/heinzgenrikh

How do I report the problem afterwards?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fenix_vulgaris

"afterwards" is too late ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/knights94

A spoon does not lie next to the bowl. It lays next to the bowl.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fenix_vulgaris

Isn't "to lie" intransitive and "to lay" transitive?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sdR-Dp4Nmn4

A spoon lies next to the bowl. Or Someone lays a spoon next to the bowl.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luis_Jalabert

why is "there lies a spoon by the bowl" considered wrong!??!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JimTaylor18

Why not " By the bowl, lays a spoon". Too direct a translation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fenix_vulgaris

I think with „lies“ instead of „lays“ it should be found.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/derekgill2

By the bowl lays a spoon - literal translation from the German and perfectly good English if not exactly colloquial/regular usuage - Duolingo didnot like it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fenix_vulgaris

This seems to be a confusion of transitive and intransitive verbs.

You can lie somewhere with no object (intransitive) or you can I inflict lying on something, the object (transitive). The verb then would be to put or to lay.

You don’t have to lay the object itself. You can also lay a table by putting other things on it. Or be abstract and lay out a plan.

A similar distinction exists in German.

to lie - liegen
to lay - legen

In the example the spoon is the subject. It does not put/lay itself somewhere it simply lies (intransitive).
https://youtu.be/sdR-Dp4Nmn4

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