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Words with Genitive

grey236
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So I've seen other people mention words like 'der' and 'aller' which I found were remnants of the genitive case in Dutch (I think). I was wondering if there were any other words like this. And what does 'der' mean? Google translate said it meant 'of', but that's what 'van' means.

Also what's the difference between alles, alle, and allemaal?

2 years ago

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Fire-ergens
Fire-ergens
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Words like 'der' and 'aller' are part of the genitive case. It's not used that much in modern Dutch anymore. But it's good to know a bit about it because older books ocasionally still use them. (pre-WW2) You'll also encounter the genitive case a lot if you go to church. (lots of it in the Bible* and also in songs)

*Unless you have 'De Bijbel in Gewone Taal' (The Bible in Normal Language)

Der means 'of the' you also have 'des' which means the same. (der is used for feminine and plural. des is used for masculine and neuter)

Aller means 'of all (the)'. (Redder aller mensen: Savior of all the people.)

Woordenboek der Nederlandsche taal: Dictionary of the Dutch language (notice the sch in NederlandSCHe? That is old-fashioned Dutch)

The Dutch wiki has some information about it. But the article about Dutch grammar is pretty much written in jargon.

https://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nederlandse_grammatic

Alles: Everything

Alle: All

Allemaal: All (when referring to something)

Wij zijn allemaal mensen: We are all humans.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/grey236
grey236
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Could I still use der, and des in sentences like: der vrouwen or des Nederlander

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fire-ergens
Fire-ergens
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No, Not in normal conversation. But if you like making poetry it's perfectly acceptable to use it in a poem.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/grey236
grey236
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Ah yes, but doesn't it mean IN the mornings? Not OF the mornings?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DogePamyuPamyu

I mean if you translate its meaning to English it clearly means in the mornings because nobody says "of the mornings"... If you translate it directly without accounting for differences in that languages, then "of the mornings" is what it literally means. But genitive was used for this phrase. I'm guessing it used to be des morgens like in German but it just got shortened in spoken language before they dropped genitive from the language altogether so the s stuck. Probably. Just a guess but it makes the logics for me.

But yeah it's genitive. The phrase just uses genitive in Dutch and there's no parallel in English.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/grey236
grey236
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Oh I didn't know that :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DogePamyuPamyu

I don't think anyone learning Dutch should be expected to know anything about genitive XD It's not used and all that's left are just remnants. I'm sure you could completely ignore the concept, memorize the weird phrases and get along just fine. It's no longer a part of the language but it's nice to know where everything comes from. :)

Also on specific sentences involving dative, you can leave a comment and usually a moderator will explain it to you. I got most of my info about Dutch genitive from Duo moderators in the comment sections lol.

2 years ago