"Gaeth Owen ei arestio."

Translation:Owen was arrested.

May 29, 2016

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/PannasOwen
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For stealing 'pannas'

October 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcode
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Yes, his nefarious past is catching up with him

January 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/bernox2

no for shooting Dewi Lingo in Swansea or some other dwll o le

October 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/royaberarth

can you explain this structure please

May 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcode
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As already mentioned 'Owen had his arresting' is how we use the passive tense in Welsh, ie something that happens to the subject of the sentence.

In English this is written 'Owen was arrested'

However a sentence 'Owen was arresting criminals yesterday' is not a passive one because it's Owen who's doing arresting. The difference is quite subtle in English, but much clearer in Welsh.

'Owen was arrested yesterday' = 'Gaeth Owen ei arestio ddoe.

'Owen was arresting criminals yesterday' = 'Roedd Owen yn arestio troseddwyr ddoe'

May 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/royaberarth

Thanks to both for these explanations. It will take years to get all these different turn of phrase learned

May 30, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcode
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Hopefully not :-)

The pattern is quite straightforward in Welsh once you practice.

eg. I was born - I had my birthing = Ges i fy ngeni

I was raised - I had my raising = Ges i fy magu

I was paid - I had my paying = Ges i fy nhalu

etc

May 30, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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I had always thought cael was "get" (receive, obtain, acquire), which would have made this even closer to English, e.g. "I've got a car" (= I have a car) versus "I got arrested".

So things like ges i fy nhalu = I got my paying = I got paid.

*checks*

Gweiadur only has "have" for cael, but geiriadur.net also has "receive, obtain; get".

January 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcode
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Yes, that is an interesting spin on this.

Although the short past tense of cael eg 'ges i, gest ti' is universally translated as 'had'

eg "ges i frecwast" = I had breakfast "gest ti hufen iĆ¢" = you had an ice-cream

and yes in some English dialects 'got' would also work here.

'Ap geiriaduron' (which is the best app dictionary by far) gives:-

"get/acquire/extract/have/obtain/procure" for "cael"

January 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/EllisVaughan
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Literally it means "Had Owen his arresting" which doesn't make much sense in English but it is how we phrase it in Welsh.

May 29, 2016
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