1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Norwegian (Bokmål)
  4. >
  5. "Snakker du til kattene dine?"

"Snakker du til kattene dine?"

Translation:Do you talk to your cats?

May 30, 2016

30 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EhabYounes

First of all CAT LADY ALERT!.

Second, When can til mean to and when can it mean for (or indicate ownership)?

Is it solely based on context?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

It depends on the context, and some verbs do favour specific prepositions.

Very generally (as in there are literally a hundred exceptions):

  • Translate it to "to" when dealing with physical direction or the direction of an action.
  • Translate it to "for" when it's something made for someone.
  • Translate it to "of" or a genitive s when it's part of the possessive construct, i.e. "nøklene til mamma".

The verbs "å lese" and "å synge" tend to take "for", while "å snakke" takes "til" unless you're actually talking on behalf of someone.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KALEDFWLCH

So it is snakker til, but synger for?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

Yes, prepositions pride themselves on being tricky.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GoVeganPls

Would snakker for indicate a performative aspect like a monologue?^^ Or a representative aspect as they have no voice of their own? Going off of german possibilities where it could be both. Likewise could synger for also mean I sing as a tribute?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Victor_Str

And leser for (gutten).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Barborama

Jeg snakker til katten mit.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

Jeg òg.

(Since "katten" is a masculine noun, you need to use the masculine form of the possessive as well: "min".)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vinnstrs

Is "òg" some kind of variation of "også"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

Yes, they're identical in meaning here. While "òg" can appear in other positions, it's usually placed at the very end of a sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eddie_Werewolf

Who doesn't talk to their pets? Duh, everyone talks to their pets.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Juan994091

Why can't it be: are you talking to your cats? Is there any way, other than specifying certain position of the body, to know if it's present continuous in present time?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Regney

Spoiler Alert! There's a lesson later in the tree on Continuous Forms. :0)

But, for the most part, Snakker du til kattene dine? means both
"Do you talk to your cats?" and "Are you talking to your cats?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LizzyLizardLips

This one is probably one of my favorites. That and the singing one. XD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/carol313062

I thought cat in plural would be katter.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Regney

The word katter does, indeed mean "cats," however, kattene is the definite form and means "the cats."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StellarHowl

Can this translate as 'are you talking to your cats?'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

Yes, it can.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galawolden1

Why is it not "snakker du til kattene din?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Niels1822

Because "kattene" is definite plural, so it needs to be "kattene dine." When "katten" is definite singular, it is correct to say "katten din."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alfa.uwu

Is it possible to say "dine katter"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lena_SchatzKatze

Who doesn't? =^.^= <3


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WarrenEsch

I would if I had any. However, I do talk to my snakes.

Learn Norwegian (Bokmål) in just 5 minutes a day. For free.