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https://www.duolingo.com/crlight

Reading My First Esperanto Book

crlightPlus
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I just started reading Fajron Sentas Mi Interne, and I am enjoying it so far (not that the beginning of the first chapter is very far though). However, I was wondering if anyone knows of an English translation of the novel, if such a thing exists, that I could have access to. I am only asking because I think it would help me a lot to have a translation to reference whenever I, inevitably, find myself not understanding a phrase, sentence, or word very well. If anyone has any suggestions, they would be highly appreciated.

P.S. I am currently using the dictionary available on lernu, but it it will not be able to help me if I encounter an entire sentence that I fail to comprehend.

2 years ago

7 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/amuzulo
amuzulo
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To my knowledge there is no English translation, but there is a German translation in case that helps anyone: http://www.u-matthias.de/verko/feuer.htm

For entire sentences, you can use Google translate to get a feel of the meaning of the sentence. Obviously you can't completely trust it though.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
salivanto
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I wasn't sure at first whether you were suggesting using Google Translate on the Esperanto version or the German. I suppose the right answer would be to do both and compare. Going on the Esperanto version alone, I wonder how long Google Translate will be helpful on "incomprehensible" sentences compared to the growing reading ability of a learner like crlight.

Of course, if crlight were enrolled in the Free Esperanto Course (FEC) he could just ask her tutor. [wink]

https://www.duolingo.com/comment/15077226

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/crlight
crlightPlus
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That's pretty much what I expected, sadly. Thanks for the response; I'll be sure try my best to get through the book. And I'm sure it will get easier as I progress in the book.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/orthohawk
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first of all, get a good dead-tree dictionary. If thee can find a copy, Butler's Esperanto-English dictionary is a treasure trove (Abe books sometimes has a copy or two available). Even Wells' dictionary is better than the lernu one (no disrespect to lernu in general for their place in the learner's community). If thee'd rather have an e-dictionary, paul denisowski's ESPDIC is very good: http://www.denisowski.org/Esperanto/ESPDIC/espdic.txt It gives not just roots but also derived forms (roots with affixes)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ionasky
ionasky
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Interesting comment on the dictionaries. Curious as to why you use the word 'thee' given its archaic status in English.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/orthohawk
orthohawk
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My use of Plain Speech (http://www.staff.amu.edu.pl/~bmaurus/plainspeech.html) is from my wish to honor two ancestors who were Quakers and also as an expression of my spiritual path. It's actually not as archaic is most people think. It's still used in the Ohio Yearly Meeting (Conservative) and a Brethren group of my acquaintance. A different form is still used in certain English dialects in the north of England.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ionasky
ionasky
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Interesting. I was aware of its use in 'plain speech' but had thought it fallen out of use there as well so it is interesting to note the use in the yearly meeting. As far as I am aware its use in northern england is again quite localised ( although tha, a dialectic varient is more common) and pretty much never used in written form, not between strangers anyway.

Facinating the things one discusses on duolingo.

2 years ago