"Jedes zweite Haus hat ein Auto."

Translation:Every second house has a car.

January 26, 2014

107 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/backtoschool

This is nana talk. A house can have a window/roof and a door, because it is fixed part of it, a so called feature of the house.

A car is not a feature of a house. In our example, the families in every second house own a car(s), that's what it is.

I wouldn't talk like that, but you may hear that sentence in spoken German.

January 26, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lookword

yes, the correct German sentence should be: "Jeder zweite Haushalt hat ein Auto."

January 27, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/backtoschool

Yep!

January 28, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cyberchipz

Because Haushalt is masculine.

July 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/maranathaman

I've never heard the phrase "nana talk" before. Where does that come from?

April 27, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/backtoschool

Nana is the grandma, they sometimes take shortcuts when they chat and gossip. To all grandmas in the world don't be offended. ;-)

April 27, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Max_Anaximenes

I'm not sure what form of English you're most familiar with, but I'm guessing it's a different dialect than many of the people on here. In the US, at least in the northeast, this is a perfectly acceptable sentence, and the phrase "nana talk" is completely foreign to me. I'd be very interested to know where you're from, as dialectical differences are fascinating to me!

March 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SUN_MAC

In Bengali "Nana" is: Mother's Father! In Tamil "Nanna" is: Mother!

December 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rwi_Cha

I'm a Bengali, and I disagree. We call mother's father 'dadu'. You probably confused it with hindi where mother's father is indeed 'nana'. (Not relevant to the discussion obviously, but couldn't help comment) :')

February 23, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nanditara

I am a Tamilian and "naanaa" is not used for mother, "amma" is. I think "naana-garu" is used in Telugu and means father.

May 15, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Colleen97

I disagree. This is a phrase I would use. As in there is a car at every other house. Either phrase is something I would say. (Native English speaker, btw.)

April 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/The_iCONer

I agree with Colleen97. I am not exactly sure what exactly backtoschool is conveying. The first part about the aspects of a house I find irrelevant, and the second part about the car, of course, it is not a "feature of the house". It is just a coincidence. If there is anything that I am missing, please tell me, because I feel as if I am missing the point of the topic.

And as SamuelCott8 said, I can use it in regular English as well.

April 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scuttly

The same from another native. It's a perfectly fine phrase, though it would be more correct to say every second house owns a car. Native speakers would not need to replace house with household and understand a similar meaning. Household / Haushalt is a little 'stuffy' nowadays.

April 23, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thomas328056

It may be a phrase you would use in English. How do you know it's a phrase you would utter in German?

April 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SamuelCott8

This is a totally normal phrase in English, too.

January 23, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thomas328056

Oh? What does it mean?

April 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cyberchipz

It means that every other house in the neighborhood has a car... it's grammatically similar to every other house doesn't have a car. Meaning they either have a car; or can't afford one and car pool or catch the bus at the corner. Something like that. The concept that in spite of the neighborhood, there is only 1 car for every 2 houses.

I personally wouldn't even notice; but I've heard people talk like that.

July 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LItalia4

Hmmm... Interesting point, backtoschool, AND where I live, in Massachusetts, USA, this English sentence is entirely fine and natural for grandmothers and for anyone else, with or without a college education. It is, however, inaccurate as far as the car count in my town.

January 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/theQuicker1

Every family owns a car, but every second house has a car parked near it. I see nothing wrong with the original. Also, I think you could say "every other" instead of "every second."

September 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tor_Heyerdal

Why is it not "zweites"? Does "Jede_" beget weak inflection?

November 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/josewilhelm

Yes. Let me copy-paste this condition on weak inflection: dies- (this/that), jen- (that), jeglich- (any), jed- (every), which decline like the definite article

November 24, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tor_Heyerdal

Ah, yes. Thanks for the reminder. I'd forgotten about jen-, jeglich-, and jed- declining the definite article, since this course has made virtually no use of them thus far, so they're out of sight, out of mind. Danke.

November 24, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/as2907

Aren't also solch- and manch- on the list?

December 5, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/josewilhelm

Yes, there again: manch- (some), solch- (such), welch- (which), which decline like the definite article. It belongs to the weak inflection

December 5, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VladiTth

silly question, but why not "jede zweites Haus"? :-)

December 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

jed- inflects similarly to the definite article, so before a neuter noun such as Haus in the nominative case, you need jedes rather than jede (which would be appropriate for a feminine noun).

Then, since jedes already has a strong ending -es, the following adjective takes weak inflection and so takes the form zweite.

December 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/slamRN

Yikes!

March 17, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/drewtyler13

Very helpful explanation! Thank you!

November 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rodrik1406

Does this have a name, or is it part of the big Inflection set of rules?

February 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

jed- is followed by weak inflection -- so in that sense it's just "part of the big Inflection set of rules".

February 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rodrik1406

I found the name: Adjectival Pronouns, which is a subgroup in the "German Declension" article in wikipedia. Thanks for your help

February 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cyberchipz

I've found this article to be very helpful; although it doesn't go into the concept of weakness; but it appears to be related to the softness. And, I imagine, -e when first is soft and feminine, and then there is following with something harder, but after a hard stop ending, something softer. But, that's an assumption based on it being harder to say two strong sounding hard endings one after the other.. I've heard the male speaker in Duo, inserting, sounds between words modifying the ending or start, sort of without having actually pronounced it strongly like a transitive sound. I'm still working on this. It only happens during the faster speaking verison. -en feels like a medium ending, not too soft, not too hard,

https://deutsch.lingolia.com/en/grammar/adjectives/declension

July 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bogus779729

So how come Der Trainer will den ersten Pferd uses ersten instead of erste?

April 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

den ersten Pferd is not correct.

April 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChrisPlatt8

Der Trainer will die ersten Pferde would be correct, surely?

April 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Grammatically correct but unusual. das erste Pferd is what I would have expected.

April 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joanabuck

Is this equivalent to saying "every other house has a car"?

December 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/slamRN

joanabuck - Yes, but as margusoja said it doesn't mean every other house (except our house) has a car.

March 17, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thomas328056

Or does it mean "Every second house (that someone owns) has a car"?

April 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nepenti

That is my guess. Although I wonder whether it could refer to "second houses", like vacation homes? The sentence seems a bit confusing.

January 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/margusoja

But doesn't that mean that "every other house (except our house) has a car"?

January 30, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/backtoschool

Well:

first and foremost: "houses can't have cars"! (it might be a part of a statistical statement), but it is still poor German. (I personally would call it wrong).

A proper statistical term would be:

"Jeder zweite Haushalt {in diesen Gebiet} verfuegt/hat ein Auto."

Now to your question, -the answer is no.

The statement says that 50 out of 100, or 1 out of 2 (households) have a car. That doesn't match with your statement. :-)

January 30, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/margusoja

I guess that this sentence "jedes zweite Haus hat ein Auto" isn't normal in any language, it's not just poor German. Somehow I have got used to the nonsence here at Duolingo :) and this was not my question.

My question was about the "every other", which to my non-English ears sounds like "all other" which is not the correct translation to "jede zweite".

January 30, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/backtoschool

Hi Margusoja, we are now told by Nickelarse below in the post that: "In English, 'every other ... and 'every second ...' would both mean the same thing," which I still comment, maybe.. Mathematically it is wrong in any language to say that every other, which means all houses in total minus the one in question means fifty / fifty. But well I take it with a grain of salt. I can't comment on him, thread too long. :-)

March 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bogus779729

I work every other day. = I work every second day. But it can be ambiguous without context because it also means every day except...(whatever day we are discussing). The same goes here. The sentence in English is ambiguous unless we have context or spell it out: every second house. Car, no car, car, no car, car, etc.

April 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sea-mist

This sentence is fine in English (I speak Australian English).

December 26, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/slamRN

sea-mist - Also works in American English.

December 26, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mrdeanvincent

"Every second house" is perfectly normal in Australian English. Colloquially it means "50% of houses", but it can also mean the more specific "alternating houses".

I believe Americans would say "Every other house" to convey this same meaning. But in Australia, "every other house" would mean "every house except this one".

September 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/backtoschool

I tried to answer, it means mathematically 1 out of 2, or fifty / fifty. Hence 50 / 50 is not what you think it could mean. "Every other house" in mathematical terms would be (n-1) where "n" is the sum of all houses and (1) is the house you exempt.

February 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nickelarse

In English, 'every other ... and 'every second ...' would both mean the same thing, and specificially mean alternating. So this sentence as translated would mean that 50% of the 'houses' (or households) have cars, and they are evenly spaced with the non-car households along the street.

March 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/araruney

I think though that 'every other' in speech is used interchangeably with 'second'.

Literally it should mean (n-1),but i've seen it used in some articles when talking about statistics,saying 'Every other person_.)

I am not a native English speaker,nevertheless i've seen such examples on plenty occasions.

March 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SandyDR

It's actually a matter of context: "Mom! Every other family goes on vacation!" has the n-1 meaning. However, in a context in which there is clear "than x" element, it has the meaning of every second, sometimes more generally (50/50) and sometimes more literally "Give every other person a card with a number on it and the others get one with a letter" (yes, that's a weird example but, hopefully, is clear).

March 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KLTah

why is zweite no declined according to the neuter gender of Haus? (i was expecting zweites). is it because the declension of jedes already tells us it's neuter?

March 23, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Correct -- the -es of jedes already shows that it's neuter, so zweite takes the weak ending -e.

March 23, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/One_Trick_Tony

This sounds like either the beginning to a riddle or the beginning to a math problem.

July 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ali.koneko

Why isn't home appropriate here?

February 24, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/backtoschool

This sentence looks to me to be written/said in a context, where the author makes comments about the statistical amount of cars in a certain region.

Mostly it will be counted as car "per household", not per "house" {see comments above}.

I give the use of "home" in this context a 'maybe', I wouldn't use it though. :-)

February 24, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkLangan

I got bumped for using "an auto" instead of "a car"? Really?

March 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ASmallGremlin

is this similar to "every other" in english?

September 14, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/slamRN

In diesem Fall, ja. (In this case, yes)

September 14, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RichardDic10

Seriously? "Every second house has an auto" not accepted?

March 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

We don't accept "auto" as an English word on this course - use "car".

March 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MeinNameI1

Well you should.

June 23, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emegele

doesnt erste zweite dritte agree with the case?

November 1, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EdricDayne

It does, as every adjective. Since you're using a definite article here you have to use the weak inflection, in the nominative case (since the house is the subject), thus the -e ending

October 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cerez00

How would they abbreviate zweite in german with numbers, is it 2te similar to how 2nd means second?

July 30, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MatthewFahey

I know this is a late reply, but in case anyone else is curious, German ordinal numbers are abbreviated with a full stop. So, "Das zweite Haus" becomes "Das 2. Haus".

March 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/slamRN

Thanks, I'm glad you replied!

December 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RWang2017

Can we say "jede zweites Haus hat ein Auto"?

March 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paul736292

Es ist nicht ganz richtig. Die Deklination ist ähnlich wie bei den Pronomen "der", "die" "das". Wenn du es mit "das" ersetzen würdest, wäre es "das zweite Haus..." Genauso ist das mit "jede" => "Jedes zweite Haus..." Bemerke, dass das es auch bei dem Adjektiv gilt, dann ist es nur "zweite" - ohne "s". Was die Streitigkeit darüber, ob es Haus oder Haushalt sein sollte, betrifft, ist das meiner Ansicht nach völlig egal.

May 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RWang2017

Ich verstehe nicht! Could you explain it in English? I wouldn't have been here if I could understand everything in German!

May 7, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OldMansChild

Is "jede" the only word that works like those articles? I can't think of anything else myself.

September 8, 2019, 2:03 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_adjectives#Weak_inflection gives a number of words that, like das or jedes, trigger weak inflection in a following adjective.

September 8, 2019, 5:18 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OldMansChild

Thanks Cyberchipz and mizinamo. I understand the second part of the rule, but I pretty much thought it was only used after definite articles, so I need to know other words that "trigger" weak inflection as mizinamo pointed out. But I didn't know the grammar's name, the result of Duolingo German I guess :)

September 9, 2019, 12:34 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cyberchipz

Jede is an adjective (a word or phrase naming an attribute, added to or grammatically related to a noun to modify or describe it.)

IOW For "Every second house": Every (Jedes, adj.) second (zweite, adj.) Haus (noun. neuter).

For adjectives, with or without an article, like (das or ein for Haus), only the first adjective gets declined as an adjective according to the noun gender and case, the rest of the adjectives get declined like they are regular articles and Nominative.)

So, here Jede gets (Jedes (declined for case (Accusative)/gender of noun (Haus), so -es), zweite (declined for the noun referring to the adjective (Jedes), which in this example means every second, or every other house, meaning more than one, so sind Jedes is plural and gender is irrelevant the word "second" gets (zweit+ e for plural) followed by the noun Haus.

Jedes zweite Haus...

This next sentence is a good example:

"Each one is like every second house" <=> Jeder ist wie jedes zweite Haus. Examining the first half of the sentence, [the word "one" is masculine and implied in Jede (each one) so singular. Here Jede gets declined as an adjective masculine singular (Jeder), no article, Nominative.

Note in the first half of this sentence there is no article (therefore declination of adjective case is Nominative and Jede become Jeder because "each one" is singular) so it gets the masculine ending (-er) for "one", which is implied and included in German for the word Jede. (While the word one is included in the English, it could be left out), "Each is like every second house" gender is added to the declination because there's no article, and the second half of the sentence is declined as stated above in the first paragraph.

One can find the declination table for adjectives here: https://deutsch.lingolia.com/en/grammar/adjectives/declension

The main point being, when using one, or more adjectives, with or without an article (definite or indefinite or none) the first (especially if only one) must be declined to indicate gender of the noun and case!), and the other adjectives decline only according to gender and the normal nominative case (der, die, das, die; or -er, -e, -es, -e). So here, zweite gets the plural -e ending for the accusative case.

Hope this helps. But, to confuse the issue, in this article near the bottom of the article, it shows that the 2nd, 3rd, etc. adjective takes the same ending as the first. Clearly not the circumstance in this Duolingo example.

https://www.germanveryeasy.com/adjective-declension

I've run across it both ways... so perhaps the exception to the rule I give is when using indefinite article or no article before the noun,and it's accusative case masculine. I do believe that some changes or exceptions are needed with mixed inflection, plural and singular forms, but it seems "Every second house" is nominative subordinate clause form, and the second half of the sentence is accusative form main clause. Perhaps someone could clear this up? @mizinamo ?

September 8, 2019, 4:00 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

t seems "Every second house" is nominative subordinate clause form, and the second half of the sentence is accusative form main clause.

Uh, what?

"Every second house" does not contain a verb, so I'm not sure what would make it a clause.

September 8, 2019, 5:21 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaulBarrette

what is wrong with "every two houses"?

April 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ReAnnJacob

What is the problem with saying a vehicle as opposed to vehicle

November 7, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

"vehicle" is too broad -- Auto means specifically a car, not a bicycle or a bus or a truck or ... which are also vehicles.

November 7, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Randonneur3

A wake-up to the trend in 'some' countries for too many cars, poor public transport and suburban sprawl. The cited ratio could be good for inner urban areas.

November 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/slamRN

Why didn't Duo accept Every second house has an automobile.?

December 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

We've decided on the course not to accept the English words "auto" or "automobile" but to require "car" instead.

December 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/slamRN

Really, here in the Midwest, USA "automobile" would sound perfectly good. Maybe because we refer to the "automotive" industry all the time, and "car" sounds juvenile to us.

December 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MatthewKur1

This is uses in English too. "Drive through Barrington Hills to see the upper class: Every second house has a Bentley and those between,Rolls." While the example is facitious, it's a valid one nonetheless and one in which no native would bot understand.

March 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KLTah

has determiner (jedes), neu, nom. m/n/f/pl: e/e/e/en

August 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Will990197

The answer should accept Household, as well as house.

August 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

But the German does not say Jeder zweite Haushalt.

It's about buildings -- or, by extension, the inhabitants of the buildings, without regard to the household groups those inhabitants form. (One house might be home to three households, for example.)

August 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/slamRN

Genau.

August 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/padmaja572925

jede zweites haus hat ein auto is it correct

October 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

No, it is not. The -s ending has to be on jedes, not on zweites; also, Haus has to be capitalised.

October 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Carolyn807110

Why zweite instead of zweites

June 25, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Why zweite instead of zweites

Weak inflection after jedes -- that word already has the ending -es for neuter nominative, so the adjective zweite doesn't have to show gender/number/case and takes a generic weak ending, which is -e in the singular nominative.

June 25, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MargaretMcMullan

I cannot see the logic as to why the words such as "erste" etc agree only sometimes with the noun. What am 8i missing?

July 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

What am 8i missing?

Perhaps the fact that German adjectives can have three different kinds of endings, depending on what comes before them?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_adjectives#Weak,_mixed,_and_strong_inflection

e.g. ein großer Mann (mixed inflection after ein) but der große Mann (weak inflection after der).

July 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DieVdU

Huh! Round here every house has 2 cars and parking is nicht leicht. In fact it leads to a lot of unpleasantness and irate neighbours.... the houses don't argue though...

September 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eli7020

a house doesnt have a car, a person does

March 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rowschank

Wouldn't this really be Alle zwei Häuser haben ein Auto or In allen zwei Häusern steht ein Auto or something similar?

June 28, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

No.

zwei is perhaps a bad example, because both German and English have a special word for "all two", but compare:

  • Jedes dritte Haus hat ein Auto. "Every third house has a car." (i.e. house number 3 has a car and house number 6 and house number 9 and 12 and 15 and ...)
  • Alle drei Häuser haben ein Auto. "All three houses have a car." (i.e. house number 1 has a car and house number 2 and house number 3, and those are all the houses there are)
August 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/john376507

jede zweiter !

November 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JillianPai2

Shouldn't it be Every second a house has a car?

April 26, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

No; we say "every second house, every third book, every tenth day", without "a", in English.

April 26, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thomas328056

Aren't we more likely to say "Every other house"? This phrasing also avoids confusion as to whether the sentence refers to the second house owned by a single person/family.

April 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Doctor-John

JillianPai2, "Every second a house has a car" would imply that after one minute, a house would have 60 cars, since there are 60 seconds in a minute. (Picture a house giving birth to a car every second.)

July 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/as2907

Not necessarily. It might be that every second a different house has a car.

July 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Doctor-John

Lol, good point for what was, after all, only a joke. To avoid ambiguity, the statement should be either "Every second every house has a car" OR "Every second some house has a car."

July 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Doctor-John

Btw, are you really actively, concurrently learning Swedish, Danish, and Norwegian? Isn't that confusing?

August 21, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/as2907

I'm not on the same level with them. I already know Swedish rather well, meaning I can read and write it quite easily, and have finished the Danish tree, whereas with Norwegian I have just begun. I haven't practised these two languages lately though, as I'm concentrating on Dutch now.

October 16, 2018
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