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https://www.duolingo.com/FaryaFaraji

Looking for willing translators for a novel.

FaryaFaraji
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Hi there. I'm currently editing a completed historical novel. Whilst the book isn't written in Welsh, there are from time to time phrases spoken in the native language of the characters, some of them who are Welsh. Though I managed to translate words and simple phrases, I need help translating specific phrases that are too complex for a non-fluent/native speaker to handle.

I need English phrases translated into Welsh. There would be around 20 or 30 phrases needed for translation.

If there are any Welsh speakers willing to assist me, it would be most appreciated, and thanks would be written in the final published product. If you're speakers of one of the languages and are willing to help out, say so here and I'll email you the list of phrases. Thanks!

2 years ago

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/EllisVaughan
EllisVaughan
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Whilst I'm not willing to give out my email I'll happily try to translate anything you need here. Is there any style you want in particular (Colloquial/Formal)?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FaryaFaraji
FaryaFaraji
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That's incredibly nice of you, thanks! The style should be closer to formal, or, more eloquently put; something that fits a medieval context more. For example, in J.R.R Tolkien's work, "You're not going to pass", becomes "You shall not pass". Essentially, if possible, the phrases should be more flowery than what you would hear the everyday modern Welsh person say. I'll post the list of phrases here, there shouldn't be more than 25 in total.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FaryaFaraji
FaryaFaraji
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Here's the first batch of phrases, I'll post the other ten or so soon. The translation doesn't have to be literal, as long as the phrases keep the meaning intact that's all I need, thanks!

  1. "How can one eat without appetite?"

  2. "Perhaps we should drink more."

  3. "According to rumours, he will be dead by dawn".

  4. "But rotten blood courses through her veins".

  5. "You drank enough wine for the evening". (The tone is : “Stop drinking wine”).

  6. "Because I don’t speak the language of Tuscany" (“Tuscany” doesn’t need translation, I found many sources citing the Welsh name as Tysgani).

  7. "Faster!" (As in : Go faster! Move faster!).

  8. "Stop reminding us of your existence". (Or, stop reminding us that you exist).

  9. "If you wish for death, I shall gladly give it to you."

  10. "Have I really aged that much?"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EllisVaughan
EllisVaughan
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  1. "Sut all un fwyta heb archwaeth?" (I'd check this with another speaker since I'm not sure you can use "un" in the same sense as "one" in which case I'd say that it could also be "Sut allet ti fwyta her archwaeth?" in the informal or "Sut allech chi fwyta heb archwaeth?".
  2. "Efallai dylen ni yfed mwy."
  3. "Yn ôl pob sôn, bydd o wedi marw cyn i'r haul wawrio."
  4. I'm not sure with this one since I assume "rotten blood" is an idiom?
  5. "Yr ydych chi wedi yfed digon o win am y noson." or "Rydych chi wedi yfed digon o win am y noson"
    6."Oherwydd nid wyf yn siarad iaith Tysgani"
    or "Oherwydd dydw i ddim yn siarad iaith Tysgani"
  6. "Cyflymach" ("Go faster" would be "Ewch yn gyflymach" and "Move faster" would be "Symudwch yn gyflymach" ,but I think "Cyflymach" is probably the best translation for what you're looking for)
  7. "Paid ag atgoffa ni dy fod di'n bodoli." (this is more "Don't remind" as opposed to "Stop reminding" which would be "Stopia atgoffa ni dy fod di'n bodoli"though I prefer Peidiwch. If you wanted something which was closer to "Stop" and was pretty flowery you could say "Rhwysta dy hun rhag atgoffa ni dy fod di'n bodoli" (Restrain yourself from reminding us.) Also I chose to use "Ti" here (infromal you) since I imagine they are speaking down to whoever this is aimed at).
  8. "Os ydach chi'n dymuno marw, mi wna i lladd chi'n llawen" ("'n llawen" is more "joyously" but that's the best way to translate that's coming to me).
  9. "Ydw i yn wir wedi heneiddio gymaint?"
    The ones with asterixes next to them are the most traditional out of all of the I believe where I used verbal particles which is why I have included a more modern form next to it.
    Any other Welsh speakers please take a look and suggest any improvements.
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ibisc
ibisc
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1 - Sut (y) gallech (chi/chwi) fwyta heb archwaeth? (not mutation after sut (how)) (un is not used for that kind of one - use plural 'you' instead, usually) or just Sut i fwyta heb archwaeth?

3 - ...erbyn y bore glas or ...erbyn caniad y ceiliog (...by cockcrow) 4 - Ond ma' 'na waed llygredig yn amlifo drwy'i gwythen

5 - Dyna/'Na ddigon o win i chwi am y noson (chwi - old-fashioned form of chi)

6 - Oherwydd na fedraf iaith Tysgani (a specific use of medru - to be able to speak/use a language)

7 - if on horse-back - Sbardunwch! (Spur on!)

8 - Os rydach wir am farw, mi wna(f) eich bodloni'n llon ('If you truly want to die, I'll happily satisfy you' - old-fashioned touch to leave out the 'yn' before 'wir')

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FaryaFaraji
FaryaFaraji
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Thanks alot, you guys are great and indeed very helpful. I'm posting the last part, consisting mostly of simpler, shorter phrases and words.

  1. "Beware." (Used in a menacing tone).

  2. "Really?"

  3. "Yes you are. You are traitors." (I should preface this phrase here with the quote that comes right before. Someone says : “We’re nobody”. And “Yes you are. You are traitors”, is it’s response).

  4. I salute you.

  5. Away! (As in “back off”).

  6. Do not come a single step further.

The rest of the translations I need are actually not for phrases, but rather, compound words. As far as I know Welsh does have the system of the cyfansoddai. I made up two compound words, or, more accurately, compound names, and I just wanna be sure that they’re not entirely wrong. Keep in mind, in the context of the story these are titles conferred to characters by other characters, and in the Middle Ages these sort of names usually didn’t adhere strictly to grammar or rules and were subject to heavy distortion.

The first one is “Arwachwynt”, made from the words “arwach” and “wynt”. From my research “arwach” seems to mean “bitter, rough, harsh”, and “wynt” should be wind. (Though I have seen some people write it as “gwynt”). So this word should be an approximation of Bitterwind, something relating to a wind that is cruel or bitter, etc.

The second one is “Haraithôd”, “Haraith” (some sources write it as “araith”) which should be “speech”, and “ôd” which seems to be “snow”. So something akin to Snowspeech in English.

I just need to know if the basic, isolated words that form the compound words are indeed what they mean. Beyond that, the grammar or logic of the compound form shouldn’t be taken too strictly as these sort of compound names/titles were common and often subject to distortion.

Thanks again alot!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ibisc
ibisc
Mod
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A quick point on compound nouns - the descriptive part may often come first, like eirlaw ('snow-rain') for 'sleet'.

Your 'snow language', for example, might be ôd-iaith or eiriaith. Avoid od without the accent - it just means 'odd'.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FaryaFaraji
FaryaFaraji
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Thanks alot for the precision!

2 years ago