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https://www.duolingo.com/grey236

Can you shorten words with *is* after them?

grey236
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English: It's time to go

Dutch: Het is tijd gaan OR Het's tijd gaan?

If not, in speech can you said het is like hets?

2 years ago

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/xMerrie
xMerrie
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Like the others said, you cannot shorten 'is'. However, you can shorten 'het' to 't.

  • 't Is tijd om te gaan.
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
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No in Dutch you don't shorten it like in English.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nilfisq
Nilfisq
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It's always very interesting to read questions that foreigners ask themselves about your mother tongue :-) Whereas "het's" is impossible indeed, it is however widely accepted to pronounce "dat is" as [das]

Dat is niet waar [Das] niet waar

You cannot, however, spell it that way.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Westermann15
Westermann15
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It depends. In reporting an (informal) dialogue, you can use ''da's'' (with an apostrophe).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nilfisq
Nilfisq
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True! ;-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/louis.vang
louis.vang
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It's time to go = het is tijd OM te gaan.

it's an expression: tijd om te gaan, tijd om te eten, ...


Het's tijd gaan? is always incorrect.

"Is" can not be shortened to " 's ".

's is a property genitive.

https://onzetaal.nl/taaladvies/advies/bezits-s-algemene-regels

apostrof verplicht voor de s

Anna Anna's scriptie Gloria Gloria's concert Luca Luca's ogen Enschede Enschede's geschiedenis

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/grey236
grey236
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Why is it ".. om te gaan"? I looked to see if 'gaan' was an om te verb and it wasn't. I just found out about the 'verbable' (http://www.dutchgrammar.com/en/?n=Verbs.au08) but I'm still confused as why om is here.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/louis.vang
louis.vang
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1 blijven to stay het blijft te proberen it remains possible to try The verbable is usually preceded by the link verbs blijven, vallen or zijn (these are all irregular verbs).

2 it's time to do something


Those are two different expressions, you have to learn separately.

The first is usually with the verbs blijven , vallen: Het valt te proberen. = Het is te proberen. Het blijft te proberen = Het is nog steeds te proberen /nog steeds uit te testen.

The second is with the verb 'time':

het is tijd om te eten / te slapen / te rusten / te wandelen.


De difficulty is maybe that both expressions use 'the' and the infinitive.

Buth they are totally different.


In Belgium some don't use 'om' in the expression 'it's time to do something.

Buth the standard language is with 'OM':

Het is tijd OM iets te doen.


In the Netherlands i found this expressions:

Naar Nederland komen OM te suderen / OM te werken.


EDIT: http://www.dutchgrammar.com/nl/?n=Verbs.Au11

"te" and "om" verbs.

Some 'om' verbs can without 'om'.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nilfisq
Nilfisq
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An om te verb is a verb that introduces the om te construction.

E.g. I decide to go

Ik besluit (om) te gaan

Besluiten is the om te verb, not gaan.

Omitting om is not a question of region but of a difference between spoken (om te) and formal/written language (te).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Multitaal
Multitaal
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About that link.
I would never use "wensen om" and "bedoelen om", just "wensen" or "bedoelen". And I can't find any examples of it being used this way. The other sentences are fine with or without "om".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Multitaal
Multitaal
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But that is not the same usage. You can't leave out "om" there.

And I can't read that article but does it really say "was bedoelt"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nilfisq
Nilfisq
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"een 'begaafde beeldend kunstenaar die zich ruime financiƫle mogelijkheden wenst om onbekommerd te kunnen werken"

In this phrase, the construction with om te does not depend on the verb 'wensen' but on the noun 'mogelijkheden'.

Hij wenst zich mogelijkheden om onbekommerd te kunnen werken.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nilfisq
Nilfisq
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"Maar wie wenst om nog een balletje te trappen met PSV-icoon Willy van der Kuijlen komt bedrogen uit."

This sentence sounds odd to me but it is not wrong. I would rephrase it as follows:

"Maar wie nog een balletje wenst te trappen met PSV-icoon Willy van der Kuijlen, komt bedrogen uit."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/grey236
grey236
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I'm probably gonna eventually get a Dutch tutor as certain stuff like om te is just too confusing for me. Thanks anyway!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nilfisq
Nilfisq
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If your passive knowledge of Dutch is sufficient you can have a look here:

http://taaladvies.net/taal/advies/vraag/595/om_het_is_moeilijk_dat_te_geloven/

The phrase Het is tijd om te gaan is more or less a fixed construction. It would be odd to leave out om here. However, in a slightly elaborated version you could again choose whether to put om or not, although without om the sentence is very formal:

Het is tijd (om) te gaan werken.

I admit: it is a little confusing, also for native speakers, since in the spoken language almost always om te is used.

2 years ago