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"She loses her keys."

Translation:Ella pierde sus llaves.

4 years ago

21 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Perder is confusing; it can be used both transitive and intransitively. If you look at a verb book, you'll be surprised at how many verbs go both ways. And some of them are common verbs too like "ver" and "saber." DL needs to give us more practice on these. It should be a separate unit or chapter on the tree. And for those of you wondering what an transitive vs. an intransive verb is... Transitive verbs = those that take direct objects. (See the sample sentence: She loses her keys.) Intransives do not take direct objects. Estar, Ir, Parecer, Ser, Venir are probably the most common ones that I can think of. As Larousse All Spanish Verbs from A to Z (2001) describes them "With intransitive verbs the action remains with the subject and is complete without the need for a direct object. Kant nació, vivió, y murió en Konigsberg."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dc108
dc108
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Thanks so much for giving this explanation about transitive vs. intransitive verbs. And I agree, a separate bubble in any tree would help understand its differences and uses. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/maricleshappen

I got dinged for su llaves. I thought, yes, the keys are plural but if they're on a ring they're a single item. But the sentence wasn't she lost her keyring, she lost her keys. Don't do what I did!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ignatznkrazy
ignatznkrazy
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You are overthinking it. The modifier has to match the noun it's modifying. If that is singular then the modifier will also be. Keys is plural, so sus llaves. Keyring would be singular, so su llavero.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Vrixton
Vrixton
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oh wow, I was completely wrong, then. I thought it was supposed to match the subject haha

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ebuddha
ebuddha
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¿Por que es " ella se pierde llaves" malo?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TracyS221
TracyS221
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ella se pierde llaves is closer to "she misses keys", or for a person to get lost / be lost (eg to lose their way in the woods) . :-)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gelaineyyy

I thought the verb "perder" was conjugated similar to the verbs "gustar" and "encantar", in which the object is the person and the subject of the sentence is that which is being lost. For example, "Las llaves se le perdieron a ella" (the keys were forgotten to her)?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JerryKim1

If the action is intentional or deliberate, the structure is normal active voice: "Ella perdió sus llaves" (she lost the keys on purpose) "ella rompió su brazo", etc. If it happens accidentally or out of her control, you use the passive voice with the person of interest in the ethical dative case and the article instead of the possessive adjective modifying the subject: "se le perdieron las llaves" (her keys got lost), "se le rompió el brazo (her arm got broken)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/territech
territech
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I give you a lingot for that explanation. Very helpful!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Nope. And, by the way, do you know a name for those verbs that "behave like gustar"?There are a lot of them. Spanish speakers use them a lot (agradar, disgustar, doler, interesar, importar, preocupar, faltar etc.). American textbooks and DL completely gloss over them when they are really important, if you're getting your Spanish chops. But "perder" as far as I know has never appeared on any list I have seen. I have also written a longer note about perder above. Gracias.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BillTrenaryMHS

As for gustar, there isn't really a name for them because they really are just normal verbs. The difficulty arises because of a hole between English and Spanish, not anything inherent to gustar. English speakers say, "I like that." Like is a transitive verb where "I" am doing the action to "that". In Spanish, gustar just means a different thing. In english it really means something like "to please."... so Me gusta eso means "This pleases me." Its not an abnormal verb. It's just that as English speakers we aren't used to the transitive action heading in that direction. We are used to be doing the action, not having thing do the action to us as in, that object is pleasing me.

Perder, Olvidar and some others are uncomfortable similarly for native English speakers who have no nativity in Latinate languages.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ProfPhil

I finally got my head wrapped around gustar by remembering movies of medieval English kings saying "It likes us well" when you knew from the context they were saying they liked it. Thus "Me gusta bien".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Craig877964

Hello ProfPhil: wouldn't that be "Nos gusta bien"?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

Per my grammar book Perder can be used transitively (I can lose something, or miss a train) and can also be used, very commonly, as a 'false passive' as you suggest (things can get lost, lose themselves). Similar to romper. It is not quite like 'gustar' verbs because it uses the 'impersonal se.' I think. ;)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Namizcoho

I also think this can be translated as ella pierde las llaves i was marked wrong

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/droma
droma
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that would be "she loses THE keys.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kathallia

I was wondering about that too.

EG: In "put your hands on your head", for some reason 'your' can be 'the'. "pon sus manos en la cabeza".

So why not here as well??

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skepticalways

Kathy, regarding your question about using "the" instead of a possessive pronoun, I believe it is because in Spanish, when one speaks of personal body parts, the custom is to use "the."

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Namizcoho

yes that's what i'm saying. Sometimes the "your" is understood. i can't tell you how many times i've heard levanta la mano, pierde las llaves?, antes de comer llava los manos.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/territech
territech
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How would you say "She loses their keys?"

4 years ago