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  5. "Mieszkamy z nią od dwóch lat…

"Mieszkamy z nią od dwóch lat."

Translation:We have been living with her for two years.

June 3, 2016

31 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RichardNewton0

This would not be translated into English as "we live with her for two years". Even though the verb is in the present in Polish, this sounds awful in English and would be translated as "we lived with her for two years", or "we have been living with her for two years"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

I see "we have been living" as the main translation. Wouldn't "we lived" mean that we don't live with her anymore?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RichardNewton0

Yes, you are correct. I was too hasty in my comment. "We live with her for two years" is definitely wrong, it sounds awful in English. But "we lived with her for two years" does imply a completed action, and would not be an ideal translation.

So, you are right the correct translation is "we have been living with her for two years" - or it could also be "we have lived with her for two years". In both cases in spoken English most people would not say "We have" but "We've".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eannaoc

"We are living with her for two years" would be a better translation I think and makes sense grammatically


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

I asked about that answer and apparently "it would mean that we are at the beginning of or in the middle of a planned two-year period of living with her".

So... that's not what the Polish sentence means. The Polish means that we started living with her about two years ago and we still live with her.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maksym626803

Is it natural to say "Mieszkamy z nią dwa lata"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

Sounds perfectly fine to my ear. Added now.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maksym626803

That's nice. Also I wonder what is the difference in the meaning of this sentence when you change "od dwóch lat" to "dwa lata".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

Not much, just the 'since when' to 'the duration'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JanKLinde

How can this be added here if it's a Polish-to-English translation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alik1989

It was added to the reverse exercise.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JanKLinde

Okay, I got to that exercise some minutes later... But I still wonder if they're exchangeable or not. I may be wrong, but I suppose there is a difference in meaning:

"Mieszkamy z nią od dwóch lat" – "We have been living with her for two years" (it started two years ago and is still going on)

"Mieszkamy z nią dwa lata" – "We are living with her for two years" (we are within this period which will end after two years)

What do you think?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

I think that while there is a chance that the second Polish sentence means what you describe, it is rather unlikely, it probably means the same as 'od dwóch lat'.

Perhaps if you were describing your plans for the next decade... "next year we move in with my grandma, we live with her for two years, then we find a place of our own".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JanKLinde

Dziękuję :-)

It seems that the English language is more precise here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mokotower

Absolutely corect an natural.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nina718439

How about "We are living with her for two years". This means we are living with her now and will continue to live with her until two years have elapsed. This sounds quite natural in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cosmicstresshead

Is this a natural sentence in polish? And does 'od' here mean something like 'since ... ago'? I'm trying to get my head around the change in tense.

Thanks in advance!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

Yes, it's perfectly natural. "od dwóch lat" means that we started living together with her two years ago. Well, around two years ago, of course no one is so precise ;)

From the point of view of Polish, the fact that English uses Present Perfect here is rather strange. We still live with her, so this seems like a perfectly basic usage of present tense. But well, of course this is just where the languages differ.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ines357762

shouldn't the translation be: we have been living...? on the exercise is "we lived"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

'have been living' is the main answer, the other is 'have lived'...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JPHQRO

Would the Polish differ if we wanted to say something like, "we're living with her for two years while we finish school"? I was confused by the present tense here so thank you for all the comments!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

So... that implies 'two years and that's it, finished'? Hmm... how probable is to say it in English? I can imagine "Mieszkamy z nią na czas studiów" (We are living with her for the time of our studies) or "Mieszkamy z nią do..." (We are living with her until...), but I'm not sure if I would say what you wrote in Polish. "Mieszkamy z nią przez dwa lata, aż skończymy szkołę"? Not sure.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JPHQRO

Thanks. That's interesting that there's not really a good translation. Saying something like that about a temporary living situation isn't at all strange in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marks797148

It's quite possible to say it, but wouldn't be a good translation of "od", since the implication of the English is that the two years has started, but has not yet concluded. That is, it started less than two years in the past, is ongoing now, and that the activity will finish after that two years is completed.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kendra800150

For me, "We have been living with her two years" sounds fine without the "for," but speakers may vary in this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dj___

How to say “we have been living with her since [we were] two years [old]”?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

maybe "Mieszkamy z nią od kiedy mieliśmy/miałyśmy dwa lata"...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkKulka

Are "nią" and "mną" true homonyms? The pronunciation of both words sound exactly the same to me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alik1989

They sound very different to me...

You can check both words on https://forvo.com/languages/pl/ where they are pronounced by natural voices.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DMR680865

We are living with her for two years now is only a little awkward but at least it keeps the present tense


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

I asked some natives and I got the answer that it's not really natural, plus "I think it would be looking forward, not back. Like, the day you move in with her, you say you are staying for 2 years".

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