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  5. "Nie lubię kwiatów."

"Nie lubię kwiatów."

Translation:I do not like flowers.

June 3, 2016

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/flashingcat

Bring me some carrots


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zagadka314

What is this reference?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

You said "no flowers", says Ashton Kutcher to Natalie Portman.

The movie is "No Strings Attached". Nothing special actually, but this scene was cool ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobinB896941

I've heard that many women would accept almost anything from that man – even flowers instead of carrots...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GresoTheGropaga

"Dislike" isn't accepted as an answer. It should be though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

Sure, added now.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/va-diim

RU: Nie liubliu cwietow.!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/proswpikos

i always say "nie liubliu cwiety", in accusative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/va-diim

Yeah, you're right. I was just drawing an analogy. Polish negation changes everything to genitive case. Russian is not as strict with that rule


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

Could you please provide me any materials on that? That's one of the most problematic things to me, when Russian Duo wants me to use Accusative when I expect Genitive...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/va-diim

Yeah, I also found that difference intriguing between Polish and Russian and got many Polish exercises wrong at first, thinking in Russian.

I don't have documentation, but it's like this: When there is none of something, the negation modifies the noun, and the noun case always takes the genitive.

Нет цветов у меня дома. Цветов нет тут. Нет там цветов.

But if the negation just modifies the verb, then the direct object doesn't need to be in genitive and just follows standard noun case rules.

Я не люблю цветы. Он ей не принёс цветы.

In Polish, it seems that the whole sentence "goes negative."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

Hmmm... the rule seems to be pretty easy, if Genitive is actually only used for "there is no X" (or "he does not have X"). It's strange to think that I hadn't noticed it if it's so straightforward...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alik1989

Actually, the distinction between Он не принес ей цветы and Он не принес ей цветов has nothing to do with negation. You can use both in a positive sentence as well. The genitve has a partitive function here, meaning "some of them".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kendra800150

I had also heard something similar to what LICA reports, that the accusative in Russian by default negates the specific flowers (I don't like the flowers), while the genitive is more categorical (I don't like any flowers). But I think there is a lot of variation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/va-diim

@Alik1989, but in Polish, accusative case objects of negated verbs take the genitive case as a rule. That's the big difference between the East Slavic languages and Polish

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