"De har ett barn."

Translation:They have one child.

June 4, 2016

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nicolesh95

They have eaten children? Oh Norway.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nicolesh95

(one of the possible answers)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brukland

I got this when I wrote "they have eight kids"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NattKullav1

Many bokmål users prefer "å spise" instead of "å ete".
So you can use "De har spist barn".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SleepingPills

How is this able to be told from "De har et barn." in a listening exercise?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae
Mod
  • 451

In regular conversation, "ett" will be stressed while "et" will be unstressed. Likewise with "én" and "en" for the other genders.

The TTS struggles with this, so we end up turning off the audio exercises for most sentences containing "ett" or "én".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gjordetbra

What does TTS stand for?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gjordetbra

Oh, I should have known that. Thank you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Magnus814722

When do you use en and when do you use ett, Um confused


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae
Mod
  • 451

en (m/f) = indefinite article
ei (f) = indefinite article
et (n) = indefinite article

én (m/f) = number (stressed)
éi (f) = number (stressed) (rarely used)
ett (n) = number (stressed)

Accents are said to be optional in Norwegian, but this is one of the cases where using them makes the text clearer. In speech, the number will be more stressed than the indefinite article, and that is what the accent marks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/edwardkaspbrak

does it matter if you use én or ett?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae
Mod
  • 451

Yes, if you're counting a noun, like "one shoe", "one tree", etc., then it needs to match the gender of the noun. Refer to my answer above for the corresponding genders.

If you're just counting with numbers, like "one, two, three", then you use "én".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Melissa.watts

Do Norwegians really eat children?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/greg839913

Only the slow ones.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae
Mod
  • 451

"Ett" means "one", but can also form part of the present perfect tense of "å ete", which means "to eat".

This, of course, opens the door for two very different interpretations of the sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PrebenPer

a child or one child ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae
Mod
  • 451

"Ett", as opposed to "et", is used to stress that it's -one- child.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Veli-Pekka10

more difference than would be in swedish :)

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