"Jego siostra rysuje gorzej niż on."

Translation:His sister draws worse than him.

June 5, 2016

19 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tom873317

"Than he" and "than he does" should both be accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KasiaGoclowski

I agree. I don't think "than him" is grammatically correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BenYoung84

I don't think the version with "does" should be accepted, that's adding an extra word not present in the Polish sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoanieKatz

His sister draws worse than him (can?) Terribly wrong! Should be worse than he!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JP3171801

'Literally zero results' is a well-placed piece of journalese. I'll have to check with my American friends whether draws worse is part of their common parlance. For me, 'draws worse' doesn't work in written UK English. I'd better return to struggling with Polish. Thanks and best wishes - stay safe and keep well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JP3171801

Most wrong is draws worse. Worse is a comparative of bad but draws bad would be draws badly - even more badly is not great English but worse is totally wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BenYoung84

Actually, worse is also the comparative of badly so it's fine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JP3171801

In terms of British English usage 'draws worse' is bad English. The solution would be to say 'more badly' - clumsy but at least grammatically correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BenYoung84

Not according to this British dictionary. Like I said, it's also an adverb so the Duolingo sentence is grammatically correct.

https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/worse


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JP3171801

The examples given in the dictionary are in common English usage but I don't think that applies to 'draws worse' even if it were to be grammatically correct. It's not polished English - but as I already have polished English I shall just continue to fulfil my aspiration of acquiring polished Polish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alik1989

There are literally zero results in the language corpus for "VERB more badly than". Probably due to the fact that almost every major internet dictionary we checked classified "worse" as the comparative of "badly".

Those unhappy with "worse"can also use "less well" here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Peter498186

I'm English and none of the suggestions sound right to me. A quick Google search showed mostly online language classes and references to draws in football. I'd probably say "His drawing is better than his sister's". I think the problem is that draw has too many other meanings: "draw level", "draw water", "lottery draw" etc. and "draw worse" would not be used. However, like another poster, I'm here to learn Polish and I cannot think of a better phrase that would back-translate correctly.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alik1989

Isn't 'his drawing' ambiguous? To me it primarily means 'what he has drawn'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Peter498186

I nearly said "drawing style" but then I'm getting further from the Polish. I agree drawing has a slant that the finished product is better/worse rather than he is holding his pen in a non-optimum way (which is the slant of the original - unless we were in an ICU where "draws breath" might be the context).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ann846979

I agree with Peter498186 that none of the suggestions sound right. The funny thing is no such problem arises with "better", only "worse". For example, "he draws better than his sister/her/she does" are all fine, whilst "draws worse than" isn't. The only way I can see of using "worse" in a natural way without ambiguity is: "his sister is worse at drawing than he is". It's not a direct translation but it sounds right. I agree with others in that "him" is grammatically wrong, but it's nevertheless widely used.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BenYoung84

For whatever reason we don't often use "worse" as a comparative of badly, but it's undoubtedly grammatically correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ann846979

Yes, that's right. "Worse" is technically correct but we don't generally use it in practice as a comparative adverb, only as comparative adjective.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ann846979

I've overstated that, what I mean is "worse" very often sounds clumsy as a comparative adverb, including in the given sentence. But something like "he is dancing worse than before" sounds fine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DorothyRoholt

It warms my heart to read this discussion, with so many trying to secure the correct English usage for this exercise, both in American and British usage. Yes, in common usage poor grammar is accepted as colloquial use. But by trying to define the correct forms it helps those who are learning English, as well as Polish.

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