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https://www.duolingo.com/NeridaPeters

I have finished the Duolingo Turkish course!

NeridaPeters
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I have finished the Turkish course. I have also finished the English from Turkish course. I've scored 5.00 in a progress test. I don't think that Duolingo has much more to offer me, and I'm feeling sad. Duolingo has been an important part of my daily routine for the last 14 months. Now I am almost ready to stop. I thought about laddering, but I don't really want to learn another language. Well, I do but those languages aren't available from Turkish.

I will continue to practice what I have learned here on Duolingo. I have people to practice speaking and writing with. I have resources for reading and listening. Now I am thinking about how I can continue learning. I want to learn Turkish in greater depth. I have looked at a variety of language learning websites, but I haven't found anything suitable for me.

Does anyone have any suggestions on how I can continue to learn more Turkish?

2 years ago

35 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/mira.alexandra

Congratulations! Build your vocabulary. I am using Memrise, there are a bunch of courses. Movies and musics can help you. Read a book. Try something easier. Find some native speakers to have a language exchange with. One of the most important things is to keep going back and strengthening your skills. Good luck! İyi şanslar!!!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NeridaPeters
NeridaPeters
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I've used Memrise the whole time. It's great, isn't it! I'm using Lang8 for writing. I have Turkish friends. They don't mind if I mix a little Turkish in with the strange mix of English and Arabic that I already use. I expect that soon I'll be speaking all Turkish all the time! Listening will be my biggest problem for a long time, but my summer holiday is coming up soon and I plan to do a lot of practice then.

How did you get to level 25? Did it take a long time?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mira.alexandra

It took me 6 months to reach level 25 for Turkish ,it takes much time and effort to get to that level!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jzlcdh
jzlcdh
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Summer holiday in Turkey? If so try somewhere cool such as the Kaçkar mountains.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexinNotTurkey
AlexinNotTurkey
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Woooohoooo!!!! Congrats!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NeridaPeters
NeridaPeters
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Thank you! And thank you for all the work you and the other course contributors have done. It was an excellent course.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JB_The_Towman
JB_The_Towman
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What books would you recommend?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NeridaPeters
NeridaPeters
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I've been doing all my reading online. Newspapers mostly. The health, lifestyle and education pages are the easiest for me to manage.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HasanYilma823230

you need to practise language i recommend www.penpaland.com there are a lot of native turkish speakers.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jzlcdh
jzlcdh
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I try to read some of the comments on "English for Turkish speakers" and try to reply to them in Turkish. I think from that I have picked up a few words or phrases used by young people. Mostly simple stuff such as "tşk" being used as an abbreviation.

Not sure though whether I have irritated some by my repeated "maalesef olmaz" when I get bored with them coming up with so many alternate translations in the comments.

There are some disadvantages such as my irritation with trying to understand a new word and finding after wasting a lot of time that it is in fact a spelling mistake.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Phlargemschnapps
Phlargemschnapps
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Congratulations! I have mad respect for those who complete this course. I can tell the creators did a really good job with it, but for some reason I've yet to wrap my head around a lot of it. I studied Russian and Arabic in school and even having done that, I think Turkish takes the cake as far as running on a different frequency. Don't feel sad. That was a huge accomplishment!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NeridaPeters
NeridaPeters
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Interesting how people react differently to languages. For me Turkish is much easier than Arabic. I like the structure of it, and it's easier to pronounce.

I feel sad because I don't really need Duolingo for learning Turkish any more. It's kind of like leaving home. While it's exciting to become independent, you still miss the support you get from your family.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cazort
cazort
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Yeah! I've noticed this, the structure of Turkish is super different from any other language I've studied. In spite of being alien, and taking a lot of work for me to start figuring it out...once I start getting it, it becomes very intuitive to me. It seems extremely logical and there are a lot of patterns in it. It seems more regular than English. To me, Russian seems more similar to English, Spanish, Portuguese, and German, than any of these languages seems to Turkish.

I've heard people say that Turkish seems structurally more similar to Japanese.

I was reading about Turkish and apparently it's thought to be from a language family that originated in Western China, so its structure and logic is more reflective of Asian languages than European languages, even though Turkey is closer to Europe.

I am personally really loving the challenge of Turkish, every other language I've learned on this site has been full of cognates (even Russian), and Turkish seems new and I feel like it's stretching my brain in a good way. I could see it making it easier to later learn another language, like Japanese, that has a very different structure and logic to it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NeridaPeters
NeridaPeters
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I learned Japanese first, and I noticed a similarity in word order for sentences. Like Turkish, Japanese verbs (and adjectives) are changed through the use of suffixes. However, the languages themselves are completely different. My knowledge of Japanese has not helped me at all in learning Turkish.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JAndrzej

Congratulations!

As for your question, Memrise has some new official Turkish course, if you want to review your basic knowledge - the course is divided into 7 parts, the first one is here: http://www.memrise.com/course/1123139/turkish-1/

Then maybe try some more advanced courses you can find there.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NeridaPeters
NeridaPeters
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Thank you for that. I didn't notice those courses. They have some interesting phrases and sentences to learn. I'll have to try them.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnnaCorinna

Tebrikler! Maybe you are already doing it, but if you are not, start watching Turkish TV series on YouTube! There are many great series and something for every taste: Kara Para Ask, Karadayi, Ezel, Fatmagülün sucu ne?, Asi, Behzat C. , 20 dakika, Kurt Seyit ve Sura, Kara Sevda, Suskunlar ........ and many more. There are also many others on the Canal D anasayfa. Iyi eglenceler

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NeridaPeters
NeridaPeters
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Thank you for your suggestions. I will start watching some of them soon. First, I have to organize access to a more reliable internet connection.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ACWACW

Tebrik ederim, Nerida. I have only just started and things are not in focus for me yet. I just stumbled over "biliyorum" versus "bilmiyorum".

The Turkish course seems to be one of the more junior ones here, so if you keep checking back I suspect that you will find new material. I am guessing that your experience means that Duolingo has not yet started crowdsourcing Turkish translation work; when they do that it will increase the amount of course content a lot (if I understand how this is supposed to work).

In the meantime -- I guess you are out of the cradle! Consider an actual college course? Probably you can place out of the first term. İyi şanslar!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NeridaPeters
NeridaPeters
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I would love to take classes with other people, but unfortunately there are no Turkish classes in the country where I am living.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cazort
cazort
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I think the most important thing for learning a language is to seek out native speakers. Where I live, there's a Turkish store, and most of the people who work there are native speakers, so I at least have a couple people that I can speak with. Going to Turkey is probably one of the best things you could do! You also could try to find language partners online and communicate using Skype or other methods.

You can also read Turkish material on social media. I am constantly encountering posts in Turkish on Tumblr...it's actually one of the reasons I decided to start dabbling in this course. This may be because I run RateTea so I read a lot of stuff relating to tea, and Turkey has a HUGE tea culture and also is one of the world's biggest tea producers. But the point is that there's a big web presence of stuff in Turkish, and that could be great for reading. Engage with the material you're most interested in. For example, because I'm already familiar with tea, it's easier for me to read material about tea in any language, than material about topics (like sports) that I know less about.

I found a cool site that has radio from a bunch of different countries, if you want to listen to Turkish radio stations it's super easy here:

http://www.radyodinle.fm/

I have only begun the Turkish course, but when I've completed other DuoLingo courses, I think it consistently gets me up to a level where the best way for me to learn more is by immersion: starting to converse with native speakers, read material in the language, and listen to or watch material in video or radio or podcasts in the language. I think Turkish is also one of those languages where it's easy to look up words in a dictionary just by hearing them, so this can help you learn words if you're listening and don't have access to native speakers.

Basically you have a lot of different options you can pursue! I'd say try experimenting and run with the things that you feel you are getting the most out of!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JB_The_Towman
JB_The_Towman
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How well did the course teach you in turkish?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Akudznam_Nafri
Akudznam_Nafri
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If you can speak German, I would gladly recommend you to finish the german tree for Turkish speakers, it would carry your fluency on the next level, like it did to me in french, if you can't speak german then I would like to recommend you to learn it :D It's a beautiful language :) And iyi şanslar with your Turkish !!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sonja884407

Hi, I speak German. What is the German tree for Turkish speakers? :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Akudznam_Nafri
Akudznam_Nafri
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It's the tree made for people who speak turkish and want to learn german, I would recommend you to do that tree after you finish your turkish tree to thereby enhance your turkish, it helped me immensely with my french, and I am sure that it would help you too :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sonja884407

Thank you for your advice. It means I have to change my language from German to Turkish and take a german course ;)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TurkishDelight_

Wow, finished the whole course? Harika! I suggest going on a vacation in Turkey (if you're up for that) and perhaps booking in a Turkish tour for Turkish speakers, not for non-Turks. That way you can chat with full blown Turks, speak to the tour guide in Turkish and visit different areas of Turkey while consuming the different pronunciations and dialects. You can try watching a Turkish dizi or reading the Turkish newspaper online. Try going to a Turkish club in your area and speak to Turks. Most of my suggestions are more on the social side rather than the online study course side, sorry for that! Congratulations on completing Turkish!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StankaVitlov

watch fantastic Turkish TV novellas like: Kuzey-Guney, Ask-n memnu, Adini Feriha koydum... this is why I started to learn 2 weeks ago...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yphigenia

@StankaVitlov : do you follow these series with subtitles then?Are these on youtube or on Turkish television, or..?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StankaVitlov

hello yphigenia. There are occassionaly series on Croatian television, with subtitles in Croatian. Unfortunately I am still far from being able to understand without subtitles. But I have watched them on Youtube too with English subtitles. The series I am talking about, the best ones, I watch on www.movtex.com streamed throug internet connection. They are a great help and motivation.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yphigenia

Thanks for the tip. Me too I am still far from being able to understand Turkish ... as it is spoken way too quickly and my mind needs time to recognise the words. I am getting better at it every day though.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Muriz6
Muriz6
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Hi Stanka, regards from Bosnia. I also started learning Turkish because of Fazilet Hanim ve Kizlari haha. I am on Level 14 at the moment and hope to finish Turkish Language Tree in maybe 6 months cause until now it took me 2 months. Huh. I wrote this in English although we could speak in our languages, but wanted other people to be able to understand our conversation. Are you still learning Turkish and how far did you go?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MrDanielz
MrDanielz
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Turk diziler, Çok guzeldir, Çok buyuk olmasina ragmen eminim ki sen seveceksin

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StankaVitlov

On my Iphone I downloaded the application Turkish Radio. There are lots of Turkish radio stations. Put your headphones on, do what you are doing, nd listen to Turkish on the radio. P.S. I still catch very little, but hope to improve. The main thing is listen to intonation and catch the meaning somehow.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JeremyKnig4

hey daddy

11 months ago