"Увасестьпланыназавтра?"

Translation:Do you have plans for tomorrow?

2 years ago

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/anderson13g
anderson13g
  • 13
  • 12
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4

"Do you have plans tomorrow?" should be a correct answer along with "Do you have plans for tomorrow." The preposition "for" doesn't really add anything in English.

I also thought that "У вас планы завтра?" would be ok but i need to ask a Russian native.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Salomeya5
Salomeya5
  • 13
  • 11
  • 6
  • 2
  • 2

Hi, I'm a native Russian speaker :) I see that you asked this questions a long time ago but still I'm gonna reply in case someone finds it useful. The point is that in English there's the word "tomorrow" without any prefixes and pretexts for all situations when in Russian there are variuos forms of creating senses for "tomorrow". So, when you say "Do you have any plans for tomorrow (or just tomorrow)?" you mean "У вас есть планы НА завтра?" and it has sort of positive meaning like you're optimistic about building plans for tomorrow together. It can be any plans, really, from work to relationships. And when you ask "У вас планы завтра?" it sounds as if you've heard that the person can't actually meet you tomorrow and you ask him or her regretfully "У вас планы завтра?". I'll make some examples so you could see it from the context. 1: -I want to meet you as soon as possible. (Я хочу встретиться с тобой как можно раньше.) -Me too! (Я тоже!) Do you have have any plans tomorrow? (У тебя есть планы на завтра?) 2. -I want to meet you as soon as possible (Я хочу встретиться с тобой как можно раньше). How about tomorrow? (Как насчет завтра?) -Sorry, I can't. (Прости, я не могу) -Why? (Почему?) Do you have plans tomorrow? (У тебя планы завтра?) As you can see, these word expressions sound the same in English and have different meanings in Russian. The absence of a strict word order in the sentence and a large number of variations in the construction of word combinations makes it possible, with the help of prepositions, prefixes, suffixes and other morphemes, to convey the mood of the speaker. I hope you got my message and found it useful :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ady00020

This is correct! ( I am a fluent russian person) =) I can help with any questions you have with my language!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/3mmaBurn5

I agree, "do you have plans tomorrow" should be accepted. I'm a native speaker (Canadian) and I would be much more likely to say that than "plans for tomorrow", although that would still also be correct.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AleksLazo

Спасибо! Ценный комментарий!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BonnieHSL

NeneVaska has the better translation. It is acceptable, as burner0 has noted, to translate this sentence, "Do you have plans for tomorrow," but "Do you have any plans tomorrow?" is a more likely usage for the American English speaker. This may be because the second phrasing is more informal, and Americans tend to prefer the most informal usage.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Theron126
Theron126
  • 25
  • 22
  • 16
  • 15
  • 4
  • 2

The first sounds more normal to my ear, the second doesn't sound like something I would say. That may be British English speaking though.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lilyfire

Theron126, that makes a lot of sense. I was pointing out the American style of communication, and would expect a Britisher to feel differently. Thanks for commenting. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnZRogers

"have you plans for tomorrow?" is good English usage!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/3mmaBurn5

It's fine, though it definitely sounds more British to me than American/Canadian. Like, if any of my friends asked me "Have you plans or tomorrow?" I would think they were putting on a strange accent or affectation for fun. It sounds either very foreign to us, or very old fashioned! ^_^

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nahuatl1939
nahuatl1939
  • 25
  • 20
  • 12
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 6
  • 6
  • 2

i have a problem here, and it is a recurrent problem with all the infinitives where the transliteration ends with an ' ( apostrophe). DUO writes it " est' " but when I write it the same " est' " DUO says i am wrong. Then I write it without the ' ( apostrophe and DUO says it is correct. What is the problem here ?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nahuatl1939
nahuatl1939
  • 25
  • 20
  • 12
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 6
  • 6
  • 2

again : in transliteration DUO writes " est' " with apostrophe. BUT WHEN I WRITE IT DUO SAYS I AM WRONG! then I write it without the apostrophe and DUO again says I am wrong. SO I CANNOT PROCEED WITH THE LESSON !!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Theron126
Theron126
  • 25
  • 22
  • 16
  • 15
  • 4
  • 2

Have you tried copying and pasting Duo's answer? If it still doesn't work, you can switch to Cyrillic just for that one sentence and copy+paste the Cyrillic answer.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nahuatl1939
nahuatl1939
  • 25
  • 20
  • 12
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 6
  • 6
  • 2

Thanks. unfortunately i am far from being a wizard in the use of a computer. I use only e-mails for my business. and I have no idea how to copy-paste anything. . Same for Cyrillic. I will have to ask my technician to do it for me.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Theron126
Theron126
  • 25
  • 22
  • 16
  • 15
  • 4
  • 2

It's very easy. Just left-click and hold on one side of the text and drag the mouse to the other side to select the text. Then either right-click and select "Copy" or else just hit Ctrl+C. Then to paste, click where you want to paste it, right-click and select "paste" or else hit Ctrl+V. Or you can easily find instructions just be Googling.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nahuatl1939
nahuatl1939
  • 25
  • 20
  • 12
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 6
  • 6
  • 2

Thanks a lot Mr Theron. I will try that. I never was technically minded. I am economically minded and a good markets analyst. But pure technic ? never. I always had somebody to do that kind of work for me. But, anyway, I will follow your instructions. Now I have some good news regarding est' vs est. This morning i went back to this lesson and, of course, it was the same as yesterday. So I tried to write est with a final i and it worked !! but, until now, I never had had to write esti. is there an explanation for that ? If I remember correctly, you are presently living in Russia ? May i ask you it is was difficult to obtain residence there? I am mounting a new business here in Peru but, as soon as it will be operating I would like to go to Russia and stay a few years there just for fun,without working anymore. Do you think it would be possible ? Thanks a lot.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Theron126
Theron126
  • 25
  • 22
  • 16
  • 15
  • 4
  • 2

Always remember, Google is your friend ;-) It can help you solve an awful lot of problems really quickly. I really have no idea how the transliteration here works. I always use Cyrillic. "Esti" as a transliteration makes no sense to me - unless "i" represents the previous consonant being palatalized? I've seen Cyrillic е and я transliterated as ie and ia after consonants before so maybe that's it. It's the best Idea I can think of.

I live in Scotland. I hope to move to Russia in about a year and a half, but I've not begun the process of applying for residency yet. I believe it is a fairly difficult process but it should be possible as long as you can prove that you have both a reliable source of income and a reason for wanting to go there. The best place to look for information would probably be the website of Russia's embassy in Peru.

As an alternate possibility, all my friends keep telling me that it's really easy to get any kind of a visa if you're going there to marry a Russian girl! :-D

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nahuatl1939
nahuatl1939
  • 25
  • 20
  • 12
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 6
  • 6
  • 2

many thanks for your answer.I I'll write to the Russian embassy here to find out what are their requirements. I love Scotland. Great food, great scenery, great history. Nice people. Spent wonderful holidays there going up to the Isle of Skye by train from Inverness ( didn't see Nessy in the lake, though)That was in 1980..

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alex.maslov
alex.maslov
  • 20
  • 19
  • 16
  • 13
  • 7
  • 548

Could I use "the plans". It is marked as wrong now.

4 months ago
Learn Russian in just 5 minutes a day. For free.