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  5. "Wem gehört das Kleid?"

"Wem gehört das Kleid?"

Translation:Whose dress is this?

January 28, 2014

84 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidGlez1

This could be translated also as: to whom belongs the dress


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HelcioTJ

Whom does the dress belong to?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alazh

"To whom does the dress belong" is the technically correct version


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J.C.Fink

And DL accepted it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Osnakezz

Which is fine. Whom is the objective form of who. In English, the dative and accusative merged into the objective case, which hasn't happened in German.

One could view whom and who in the same way as one would look at him and he. For example, you wouldn't say ''The dress belongs to he'', but ''The dress belongs to him''.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J.C.Fink

Well, one would HOPE one wouldn't say "The dress belongs to he", but people say (and even argue for) the most amazing thing things: "Her and my mom are sisters."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chris562434

Who does this dress belong to To whom does this dress belong

It is not traditionally acceptable to end sentances with 'to' (prepositions?).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatriciaJH

This is an old myth, and it leads to some terrible writing. English is not Latin, and trying to insist that English should follow Latin rules is quite as silly as insisting that English should follow the grammar of French. In English, prepositions often do fall naturally -- and correctly -- at the end of the sentence.

Here is the Oxford English dictionary on the history of this awkward dictum, giving examples showing why it is bad and wrong. https://blog.oxforddictionaries.com/2011/11/28/grammar-myths-prepositions/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HerrArbo

While that is true, Saying "to whom something to" isn't correct in any form of English that I know of.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gray_Roze

Of course not, and nobody said it was. "Whom does this dress belong to," on the other hand, is.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gregoire

Mmm that sounds pretty yoda-y to me. It sounds better as "To whom does the dress belong."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ph516503

Grammatically you're absolutely correct, but in common usage most people would (probably wrongly) say "who does the dress belong to?".

Reminds me of the old quotation "up with this I will not put"...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/skibo21776

Alas, English is descriptive not prescriptive and thus always in a state of flux. Use a phrase often enongh and it will be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DerekSimms

Unfortunately, in some case...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HerrArbo

That is also correct, but not "to whom does the dress belong to"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SteveSwart1

Well, if you are going by how it sounds colloquially as opposed to grammatical correctness, then 'Who does the dress belong to.' wins hands down.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mechanigenic

I also wrote "To whom does the dress belong to?" but it was not accepted. I am not sure if it is correct English though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thomasmac

If you put 'To Whom' at the start of your sentence, there is no need to put 'to' at the end of your sentence. "To whom does the dress belong?" is the same as "Whom does the dress belong to?"

Now, Duo might be messed up and wouldn't accept either, but the two examples above are correct in terms of English grammar.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mechanigenic

That was helpful. Thanks a lot.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dave.pretty

It is indeed not taking "To whom does the dress belong"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Derchanmann16

You also never want to end a sentence with "To" "With," or any other preposition, in proper English; however, in American southern English that is fine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ph516503

In most English I've ever heard it would be fine. People don't really use whom correctly in everyday usage, in the UK or US.

I'm not sure where they speak "proper English". :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mary430720

In my house, growing up and raising my children. And it is noticed in many educated circles.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnWycliffe

"Excuse me, I don't know who to give this to" is grammatically correct far outside of the American south. There are exceptions to practically every "rule" in English grammar. "Where does that road lead to?" is also correct. Granted, both of these could be reworded to avoid the "to" at the end of the sentence, but that doesn't make them incorrect.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J.C.Fink

And there is no real reason to avoid putting the "to" at the end.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chris562434

Except grammatical rules. You can choose not to follow them and this particular one is very commonly broken and to the extent that many consider it to no longer be required. My personal preference is to seek to follow grammatical rules where i know them. It seems everyone is very keen to follow them when learning a foreign language but less interested when they relate to their own language. The argument that it is correct to put 'to' at the end of a sentance because it's common isn't a very strong one - everyone believing the same mistruth doesn't make it true. Just my opinion.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/russianduo

Wrong. While it is commonly accepted as correct, they are iduomatic, and not grammaticly correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mdprasad

In most cases, it's a myth that ending a sentence is grammatically incorrect: https://www.grammarly.com/blog/youve-been-lied-to-heres-why-you-absolutely-can-end-a-sentence-with-a-preposition/ There are lots more articles about it, google it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sabman

Does: Wem = To whome ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ssmusic

I have the same question, or better still, what does "Wem" mean exactly?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HelcioTJ

Wem (the dative form of Wer)? = To whom?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J.C.Fink

wem = to whom


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sinekonata

To whom, actually.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/veganpanda

Wem also means "whose"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZoeCannon

"Whose is the dress?" is really awkward English. I'm just saying.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/smudgeon

But "Whose dress is this?" isn't :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J.C.Fink

"Whose is the dress?" doesn't bother this native speaker.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/christian

Please do not report mistakes or alternative translations in the comments. Use the report button. Thanks!

http://i.imgur.com/TWOaJJB.png

If the report button is not available, you can use the "Support" tab on the left of your screen.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gregoire

What if we want to discuss the mistakes and alternate translations?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaurDL

What if we are using the app...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eisen962925

Then tap the flag rather than the talk bubble.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaurDL

lol, two years too late for me, but maybe someone new will appreciate the answer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/veganpanda

I've done this a few times but nothing changes positively, the way we talk in the UK is totally different from Germany and the US, but still Duo marks UK phrasing as wrong mostly.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatriciaJH

When you report it, mention that this is normal UK phrasing, they do try to include all the regional variations in the correct answer database. But the British Empire was big...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Agota1950

Who does the dress belong to? -is also a good translation!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HelcioTJ

As "who" in this case does not refer to the subject of the sentence, "Whom" should be used here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mollydot

For more technically correct English. But "who" is perfectly good natural English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jon754959

Which would be more common in German: using the dative as in this sentence, or using the genitive e.g. "Wessen Kleid ist das?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnWycliffe

The Dativ, though both are used.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/James376267

Why the use of gehört and not hört? Does this mean belonging to someone as opposed to just belonging?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

gehören is to belong.

hören is to hear.

They are two different verbs.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/The-German-Hit

Wouldn't the right translation be 'Wem kleid ist diese'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alicenahazel

Wrote same answer as aabove which is much, much more commonly said


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dzaved

Kleid isn't also a "cloth" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/karina_cc

I wrote 'Whom does this dress belong to?' and duolingo marked me wrong. Is there something wrong with this sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnWycliffe

I know you wrote this a year ago, but in case anyone else wants to know, this construction isn't grammatically correct. You would say, "Who does this dress belong to?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatriciaJH

"Whom" is vanishing in English, but either "who" or "whom" would be normal here - and "whom" is formally correct. See: https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/usage/who-or-whom


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DerekSimms

Indeed; strictly speaking, 'who' is a subject pronoun, 'whom' an objective form, comparable to 'he' and 'him', 'I' and 'me', etc. 'Whom' is generally replaced by 'who' when it stands at the beginning of a sentence or clause. Although this is deprecated by some people, but I think is only a problem in the most formal writing/speech. But as the subject of a following verb: 'the woman whom I said would be waiting for you' for example, the 'whom' here should read 'who' as it is not the object of 'said' but the subject of 'would be waiting'. Removing 'I said' makes it a little clearer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaurDL

That, or he is missing the preposition "to". "To whom does this dress belong to?" would also be correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnWycliffe

Without the last "to." You only need one. ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sagher

I write "whose dress is this?" And it was accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mallopallo

why is "Who owns the dress?" not correct? Duolingo claims that the problem is "the" instead "Who owns that dress?" would be correct, but why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/komokino

why wasn't 'who owns the dress?' accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vossbert1

"who owns that dress" was accepted today


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mechanigenic

Can we also use "Wessen" instead of "Wem"? Like in "Wessen Kleid ist es?"..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mariam.m.s.e

should not Duo have used "wessen" instead of "wem" in this question? I understand Wessen is to ask about ownership?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnWycliffe

Not in this sentence, but in a similar one such as Wessen kleid ist es? You wouldn't say "Whose belongs the dress?" Wem = to whom.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mariam.m.s.e

thank you, so basically two different ways of asking the same thing


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hghenrygarrett

I thought gehoren was to listen


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatriciaJH

You're thinking of the verb "hören," to listen, hear; gehören, to belong to, is derived from hören, to hear, listen to. My belongings listen to me? But then, in English, apparently my belongings long for me... Looking it up on wiktionary, it seems that my belongings concern me, so perhaps in German, one listens to ones belongings: https://en.m.wiktionary.org/wiki/belong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JeffAbandy

So would Wem gehört dem Mann? Mean whose man is this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gray_Roze

It would be "der Mann" because "Mann" is the subject.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/padmaja572925

i do not understand the usage ihr, ihnen, euch etc


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/padmaja572925

please explain to me the difference between ihr, euch, ihnen


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/adolf618982

Why not who has the cloths


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StephenJam5077

Why is it conjugated as gehört?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gray_Roze

The verb is gehören, and it is conjugated to gehört because the subject, das Kleid, is third person singular.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StephenJam5077

Of course, thanks. I'm starting to get my head round this. Vielen dank.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gray_Roze

No problem! Dative verbs are a little bit hard to get at first.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TysonMeyer

Who is the one that owns this dress..

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