https://www.duolingo.com/Roger_Burke

How much Arabic is there in Spanish

And the answer is! About 8% of the vocabulary can be traced back to Arabic. Like most people I know that Spain was occupied by Arabs for 700-800 years, but I had never seen a number put to the percentage of the vocabulary until today. And a bit of Arabic also exists in English as well. For instance, there is a good chance you are wearing something with an Arabic name. Cotton (English) and algodon (Spanish) both come from "al coton" (Arabic). And if you are in the Navy you report to an Admiral (english) Almirante (Spanish) or Almiralo (Arabic). So with the world situation the way it is, it is interesting to note that many of us might speak a little Arabic. So have fun studying Algebra. Al Jabr is Arabic for the art of restoring that which is missing. The"Hidab AL-JABR wal-muqubala" an early text on restoring what is missing in a mathematical formula was written by the Arab mathematician Mohammed ibn-Musa al-Khowarizmi and was the source of the name for that branch of mathematics. Interestingly an "Algebrista" in Spanish is a bone setter or one who recovers what is missing for someone with a broken bone.

2 years ago

36 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/John00625
John00625
  • 22
  • 18
  • 7
  • 5

I remember doing an immersion article on this topic, this was the article. http://www.spanishdict.com/blog/the-arabic-influence-on-the-spanish-language/

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AR_Elsherbiny
AR_Elsherbiny
  • 23
  • 22
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 3
  • 3

Bravo, very interesting article and full of useful information (Y)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tintin_73
Tintin_73
  • 25
  • 25
  • 14
  • 13
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 6
  • 6
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 41

I believe that Native Christians in occupied areas were called Mozarabes and the coverts and immigrant population were called Muladies.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ahmed.Eldesoqy

It was called "Amirul-bahr" in Arabic .. not "Almiralo" It is latterly mean "the prince of the sea" which mean the sea soldiers their are also a lot of English & Spanish words taken from Arabic words like "Banana, sofa, camel, physics, chemistry ...etc It's about 10% of spanish

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roger_Burke

My ear is not finally tuned to Arabic (yet) but I gave it my best try after listening to it being pronounced by a computerized translation.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ahmed.Eldesoqy

May I make a deal with you if you want, I can teach you Arabic, and you will help me to improve my english

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roger_Burke

شكر

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roger_Burke

Thanks, however Spanish is almost more than I can handle. I do not have a talent for languages.

2 years ago

[deactivated user]

    The names of the areas such as Gibraltar, Algeciraz, Tarifa, Murcia, Granada etc. all have origins in the Arabic language.. Plus, the word Al Andalus is also Arabic. (With roots in the latin word Vandalicia (lands of the Vandals) refering to the Germanic tribes who invaded the Western Empire..

    EditDelete2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Selma-Ibrahim

    You might be surprised that a word as common as "usted" is originally Arabic, derived from the word "أستاذ", pronounced "oos-taath".

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/LeeBrownst1
    LeeBrownst1
    • 25
    • 25
    • 25
    • 666

    I had been taught that "usted" is a shortening of "vuestra merced" ("your grace," a submissive form of address). See "https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/usted" for example.

    The abbreviation for "usted" is "Vd," a carryover from its origin. See "http://spanish.about.com/od/historyofspanish/a/usted_vd.htm".

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Selma-Ibrahim

    Oops, sorry didn't know that. Since they sounded almost identical I thought . . . Oh well, I feel really stupid now.

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/LeeBrownst1
    LeeBrownst1
    • 25
    • 25
    • 25
    • 666

    Perhaps it entered Arabic from Spanish? The scholars are still arguing about it. According to this forum it entered Arabic from Farsi, and it is a "stunning" coincidence that it is so similar to Spanish.

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/AR_Elsherbiny
    AR_Elsherbiny
    • 23
    • 22
    • 7
    • 6
    • 6
    • 5
    • 3
    • 3

    Selma-Ibrahim: Don´t be, you are right, as per the article written by onthehype25. Here is the link: http://www.spanishdict.com/blog/the-arabic-influence-on-the-spanish-language/

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Roger_Burke

    Not as much surprised as fascinated by the history buried in languages.

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/AR_Elsherbiny
    AR_Elsherbiny
    • 23
    • 22
    • 7
    • 6
    • 6
    • 5
    • 3
    • 3

    There are many other words that are similar or close in pronunciation at least. I am not sure though if it is derived from the peer Arabic words or not, but it is worth knowing. Below are some examples: 1. Camisa (Spanish for shirt) in Arabic is Camis 2. Azucar (Spanish for sugar) in Arabic is Sucar 3. Baño (Spanish for bathroom) is also pronounced the same in Arabic but it means bath tub I am sure there are other words as well, but nothing else comes to my mind as of now. Interesting, right? :)

    2 years ago

    [deactivated user]

      There are several theories about the word camisa since the Latin (or French?) word is very similar too. However, azúcar and baño both derived from Arabic.

      EditDelete2 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/AR_Elsherbiny
      AR_Elsherbiny
      • 23
      • 22
      • 7
      • 6
      • 6
      • 5
      • 3
      • 3

      That's why I said I am not sure if it is derived from Arabic or not. If you have more words, please share with us.

      2 years ago

      [deactivated user]

        Yep I already knew! Thats one of the reasons why I'm interested in Spanish and Spain in general! Not just the language, but also some of their culture is originally from the Arabic culture.

        EditDelete2 years ago

        https://www.duolingo.com/Tintin_73
        Tintin_73
        • 25
        • 25
        • 14
        • 13
        • 13
        • 12
        • 11
        • 11
        • 10
        • 6
        • 6
        • 4
        • 4
        • 3
        • 3
        • 2
        • 2
        • 2
        • 41

        There is certainly a connection, especially as it relates to the Berber influenced Maghrebi Arabic language and culture. The Mujedar architecture is a legacy found throughout most of Spain.

        2 years ago

        [deactivated user]

          Maghrebi Arabic is not solely influenced by African languages such as today's Amazigh (since it wasnt ONE language before, but many many different dialects/languages), but also languages like French and especially Spanish, since a part of Morocco are descendants of Spanish Muslims.

          EditDelete2 years ago

          https://www.duolingo.com/Tintin_73
          Tintin_73
          • 25
          • 25
          • 14
          • 13
          • 13
          • 12
          • 11
          • 11
          • 10
          • 6
          • 6
          • 4
          • 4
          • 3
          • 3
          • 2
          • 2
          • 2
          • 41

          It would be fascinating if a course in Arabic were taught on Duolingo. It would be interesting to study the etymology. I think there is so much to learn.

          2 years ago

          [deactivated user]

            Have you read about its mother/sister-language Aramaic?

            And yes, there is so much to learn!:)

            EditDelete2 years ago

            [deactivated user]

              Yes, the Arabic alphabet is very influenced by the Aramaic alphabet!

              If you want to learn it, then I would suggest you to try to learn the alphabet first. It is not as difficult as many people may think. :)

              EditDelete2 years ago

              https://www.duolingo.com/Tintin_73
              Tintin_73
              • 25
              • 25
              • 14
              • 13
              • 13
              • 12
              • 11
              • 11
              • 10
              • 6
              • 6
              • 4
              • 4
              • 3
              • 3
              • 2
              • 2
              • 2
              • 41

              I have read about Aramaic. From what I read, Aramaic was the lingua franca of the Middle East before Persian, Greek and ultimately Arabic dominated there. Today I think only small remote Assyrian and Chaldean Christians and possibly Yaziri communities in Iraq and Syria use it. I also read that both the Arabic and the Hebrew alphabets derive from it. I follow the thread about the Arabic for English coming but I haven't noticed much progress over the past 6 months. I keep hoping it will come out in the incubator so I can begin to discover the Arabic language!

              2 years ago

              https://www.duolingo.com/shadowhawk.js

              From the Arabic I have studied, I think its influence on Spanish is largely in the pronunciation. The Spanish J sounds like the Arabic H, and both have rolling R sounds for instance.

              2 years ago

              https://www.duolingo.com/Tintin_73
              Tintin_73
              • 25
              • 25
              • 14
              • 13
              • 13
              • 12
              • 11
              • 11
              • 10
              • 6
              • 6
              • 4
              • 4
              • 3
              • 3
              • 2
              • 2
              • 2
              • 41

              This is incorrect. Scottish and Russian both have trilled R's and the hard J is part of a shift in pronounciation that occoured in the XV-XVI century. Arabic loanwords are mostly found in other places, like many words beginning with "al" that do not have Latin origin

              2 years ago

              https://www.duolingo.com/DMoak

              thrilled or trilled?

              2 years ago

              https://www.duolingo.com/Tintin_73
              Tintin_73
              • 25
              • 25
              • 14
              • 13
              • 13
              • 12
              • 11
              • 11
              • 10
              • 6
              • 6
              • 4
              • 4
              • 3
              • 3
              • 2
              • 2
              • 2
              • 41

              Trill indeed!

              2 years ago

              [deactivated user]

                Several thousands words are a lot, though.

                EditDelete2 years ago

                https://www.duolingo.com/Tintin_73
                Tintin_73
                • 25
                • 25
                • 14
                • 13
                • 13
                • 12
                • 11
                • 11
                • 10
                • 6
                • 6
                • 4
                • 4
                • 3
                • 3
                • 2
                • 2
                • 2
                • 41

                I completely agree. There are many influences from Arabic in Spanish, Portuguese, and to a lesser extent, Catalan.

                2 years ago

                [deactivated user]

                  Even in English, but not THAT much compared to Spanish.

                  EditDelete2 years ago

                  https://www.duolingo.com/dubhais
                  dubhais
                  • 12
                  • 7
                  • 6
                  • 5
                  • 5

                  Ójala is probably an obvious and common one. I don't know any Arabic, but I wonder if the structure is used similarly.

                  I also note the tautology introduced as a consequence of borrowing many words with the Arabic article, which then take a Spanish article, possibly even al also e.g. Voy al Alcázar de Segovia.

                  2 years ago

                  https://www.duolingo.com/gabriel214008

                  Arabic has some similarities to spanish, but is not very similar in gramatics tho, as far as I can tell it has some similariries in the vocabulary (note: i do not speak arabic, nor spanish, just kidding I do speak spanish, is my mother language

                  2 years ago

                  https://www.duolingo.com/Roger_Burke

                  I just made the discovery that my wife's first name might derive from Arabic. Her first name is Yajaira and Arabic has a womans name "Jawhara."

                  1 year ago

                  https://www.duolingo.com/HssmEddine

                  proud to be arabic

                  9 months ago
                  Learn Spanish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.