https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JackyDW

Do vowel tones bleed into other letters, including adjacent vowels?

June 10, 2016

9 Comments

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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JanPaulido

I dont think so , the tones are letter specific as far as i know , i try to use my hand to visualise the tone mark , up , down , rising falling , whatever , as i speak to help with memorisation of and , pronunciations of words / tones , like a conductor maybe, it helps me

June 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JackyDW

Have a lingot for the Toki Pona logo.

June 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JanPaulido

Pona! Nimi mi li Toki Pona

June 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JackyDW

I don't know Toki Pona yet. Do you know any resources?

June 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidSinghiser

I'm not exactly sure what you mean. There are different diacritical marks, some for a unique vowel sound and others for tones.

For example: ă, â, ê, ô, ơ, ư are distinct vowels.

Then there are the marks for the tones: sắc, huyền, ngã, hỏi, and nặng. The tones are for the whole word. Those marks can be used over every vowel: a, ă, â, e, ê, i, o, ô, ơ, u, ư, and y, but only one tone per word: muốn, huyền, nước, hỏi, cũa, etc.

June 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JackyDW

I mean, as in, say, the word học. Học has a brief falling "heavy" tone (nặng). Does the following c have the same pitch as the end of the nặng tone on the ọ?

June 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidSinghiser

Yes. The diacritic marks over the vowel represent the tone for the whole word.

June 11, 2016
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