"Il met un chapeau."

Translation:He is putting on a hat.

January 29, 2013

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/1429jhf

Is there a liasion between "met ^un chapeau" should we pronounce the T?

March 7, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/DianaM

No. Liaison following a verb is forbidden.

http://www.lepointdufle.net/ressources_fle/liaisons_obligatoires_liaisons_interdites.htm#.U-aCbvk7tJl

Exception: liaison does happen after "est" and "ont"

August 9, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/tsiggillino
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Doesn't one pronounce the 't' in "ont" anyway?

August 24, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Jackjon

No.

August 24, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/tsiggillino
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Wow, I checked with the way google translate pronounces it and you're right. Perhaps my french teacher's been wrong the whole time or she never noticed my pronunciation mistake. Thanks.

August 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/TexasAMC

Is there a standard reason why the -t sound is not added to the front of un? Il meh tun chapeau?

November 3, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/DianaM

Liaison following a verb is forbidden.

http://www.lepointdufle.net/ressources_fle/liaisons_obligatoires_liaisons_interdites.htm#.U-aCbvk7tJl

Exception: liaison does happen after "est" and "ont"

August 9, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/JoseQu

so Don means also put on / wear in English... I didn't know that

January 12, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/DianaM

Very old-fashioned.

August 9, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/1429jhf

Can I say " il pose un chapeau"??

March 7, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Markle0
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http://french.about.com/od/vocabulary/g/poser.htm It seems to be a different sense of 'put'. To ask a question, or to put (something) down.

March 30, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/flint72
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Why not simply "he puts a hat", for example on the table, rack etc. 'metre' is used for 'put' in this sense I believe.

August 12, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
Mod
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When "mettre" is used in the context of clothing, it means that the person is "putting it on". It can also mean "wear" but only in the sense of "putting it on". Once you have put it on, "mettre" no longer applies, and you would say "porter" for "wear", i.e., il met un chapeau = he is putting on a hat; il porte un chapeau = he is wearing a hat. English would not say "he puts a hat" because it requires that you say where he put it. Il pose le chapeau = he puts the hat down (or) he puts down the hat.

March 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Jackjon

Excellent n6zs. Thank you.

March 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/cdaber
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Ok, so I wrote:"He is wearing a cap" and duolingo maked me wrong stating that the correct translation is :"He is wearing a hat". This in spite of "cap" being a perfectly acceptable translation for "chapeau".... go figure. Also, regarding the word "don"... I recall the prerecorded safety announcements on aircraft containing the phrase " don your life jacket" on Qantas international flights.. :-)

March 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Jackjon

Hat=Chapeau and Cap=Casquette (generally) Even in English Hat and Cap have differing purposes and interpretations.

March 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/cdaber
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A aah... yes casquette... of course.... but why does duolingo have "cap" as a suggested translation for chapeau? Strange.

March 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Jackjon

Oh dear, to be honest, even though Northernguy has explained this to me, I still don't know. It is something to do with preparing(?) us for later tasks and different contexts. Also, that it brings us here to the forum and our more knowledgeable colleagues can explain. Well my friend, fat lot of use this explanation has been wasn't it? I've been over a year here and your query pops up constantly. Additionally, "Cap" in UK is very rarely used without an adjective to describe which type it is whilst "Hat" is very rarely used with a descriptive. Cdaber, I treat the hover hints with the same respect I treat wild lions! I use a dictionary and larousse alongside the lessons and leave the "lions" either safely caged or away in the wilderness of another country.

March 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
Mod
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If you're wonder why the suggested answer is in present continuous (is putting on), don't panic. French present tense may be translated as "I put on", "I am putting on", or "I do put on". If you feel the need to emphasize the fact that the action is taking place in this very moment, you can say "Il est en train de mettre un chapeau" Literallly, He is (in the process of) putting on a hat). But English can work either way without so much as a by your leave.

June 5, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/BeatrixDucz
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Hi, take cannot be used in this sentence?

September 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Jackjon

No. To take=Prendre. To Put (on)=Mettre.

September 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/DianaM

I believe the only context in which "mettre" could be translated as "take" would be in the sense of taking or spending time. My dictionary gives this example: "Il met trois heures pour venir de Paris." "It takes him three hours to get here from Paris."

September 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/mufc63

cant you do 'he put on his hat'

March 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Jackjon

Nope Mufc63. His Hat=Son Chapeau and it is not in the task sentence, is it?

March 1, 2016
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