1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: German
  4. >
  5. "die Eier"

"die Eier"

Translation:the eggs

January 29, 2013

30 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Amartya1511

Why is the "d" small here in "die"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/soundray

The "d" in "die" is lowercase because it is an article. Articles are only capitalized in the beginning of a sentence (same rules as in English).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alexbzx

You say they are capitalized at the beginning of sentence. For me i saw "die Eier" , it's not capitalized. I don't understand why it's not capitalized.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/soundray

It's not a sentence, just a fragment. The rule applies to sentences.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kaelen.cra

For eggs to be plural they add er for orange to be plural they add a N and fpr apple to be plural the word stays the same as singular this is so confusimg


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/soundray

Yes, German tends to have more exceptions to its rules than instances where the rules apply. That's a classic complaint -- Mark Twain wrote about it in "The Awful German Language".

Note that the plural of "Apfel" is "Äpfel", so it does change. There are a few words where a vowel changes to an umlaut in the plural: "Baum" -> "Bäume", "Ofen" -> "Öfen". An example where the plural is the same as the singular is "Teller".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rogue1717

Apple changes from Apfel (singular) to Äpfel (plural) not sure why but just add the 2 dota above the 'a' hope that helps


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/polyglot720

Is the article "die" always used as the with plural nouns?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/soundray

Yes. Das Hemd, die Hose, der Schuh -- die Hemden, die Hosen, die Schuhe.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pada.online

In nominative and accusative case, yes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyanWat

Care to elaborate? Basics 2 taught that both nominative AND accusative use "die" to indicate plurality.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pada.online

That's absolutely true. I added accusative to my previous post now.

Learn more about German articles here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_articles


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dgrigg

Sometimes it wants the, other times it doesn't care. I literally just had die eier show twice, once it requires the, but just once...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Prachi_11

This question is repeated 6 times in the same topic


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AHMariam

why is eier, not eie?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pada.online

Das Ei is a neuter noun. Plural -e is used with masculine and feminine nouns.

https://deutsch.lingolia.com/de/grammatik/nomen/plural


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Madequerido

Can you also use Gelege instead of Eier?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/soundray

That's a rather specific term for one or more eggs in a nest that you expect to hatch. Use Gelege if you are an ornithologist -- not if you are making breakfast or grocery shopping.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Madequerido

I see, thanks! I had seen an image of eggs with "Kanadaganz Gelege" written next to it and thought Gelege meant eggs instead of the nest :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/soundray

Note the spelling: Gans -- goose; ganz -- whole.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pada.online

No, das Gelege (von Eiern) is translated the clutch (of eggs).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Madequerido

I see, thanks! I had seen an image of eggs with "Kanadaganz Gelege" written next to it and thought Gelege meant eggs instead of the nest :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pine_forest94

It didnt let me choose the word "the"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pada.online

Can you elaborate some more on that? Which task were you working on, what exactly were you trying to do and what would you expect to happen?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OmniGlot2000

Someone the rules for n ending and e ending


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arefgee

A question re. pronunciation: the "r" ending eier is not pronounced here. Is that hoch deutsch, plat deutsch, or another dialect? A relative of mine pronounces "r" almost gutterally, similar to French: "garten" sounds like "garchten". Perhaps a native German could explain. Thanx in advance!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/soundray

My guess is that your relative is Rhenanian or Hessian. For these dialects, a hard pronunciation of the r before a hard consonant is characteristic. In other dialects -- that of the Ruhrgebiet for example -- the r is slurred, so it sounds more like "Gahten". Others might use a rhotic r. But all dialects I am aware of drop the 'r' at the end of "Eier" -- if you pronounce that 'r' it's going to sound like a French or Slavic accent.

Learn German in just 5 minutes a day. For free.