"Die heiße Suppe ist lecker."

Translation:The hot soup is tasty.

June 16, 2016

130 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/134455u

Yes, it appears as though this has a double meaning. In this context, heiße means "hot". In another context, it would be, "Ich heiße Red." Which means, "I am called Red." So you have to use the word according to its context.

January 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Con_Coppertin

Are you a fan of "Orange ist das neu Schwarz"? Cause if you are, ich bin auch!

January 20, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/zengator

das neue Schwarz

January 20, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/RoyJ17

Triple meaning: heiße can also be used as in hot like "Die heiße Katzen" for the hot cats if I recall correctly. Depends on the context.

October 28, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/TommasoCec6

Is "hot cat" a new kind of "hot dog" with different ingredients?

June 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Andrew703962

lol

August 21, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo

I'm not sure what you mean with "triple meaning"; BlakeHargrave already mentioned the meaning "hot" of heiß.

Also, die heiße Katzen is wrong; with die it would be die heißen Katzen (but heiße Katzen without die).

October 29, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Ondtogviltonsket

Heiße means *'mean' * too, isn't it?

April 14, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo

Not really, and definitely not in the meaning „intend to express a meaning“.

April 14, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/LuannLima3

That is so crazy

August 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/MarijanaFlego

Why is "The soup is delicious" wrong?

September 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/zengator

Because the adjective "hot [heiße]" is missing.

March 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Chuckk7

No, because, "The hot soup is delicious" is also wrong.

May 23, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/margusoja

Warning: according to my understanding hot soup has two different meanings in English and in German there are two different adjectives for these meanings.

  • hot (spicy) soup = scharfe Suppe;
  • hot (at high temperature) soup = heiße Suppe;
July 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/zengator

True: "hot" is often used as a synonym for "spicy".

July 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Ash473779

How does this word fit into the phrase 'Ich heiße Ash' without becoming nonsense

December 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/2GreyCats

It doesn't. They are two different words: heiß = 'hot'(adjective); heißen = 'to be called' (verb). It's just accidental that the feminine form of the adjective, and tbe first-person form of the verb happen to look alike. We park the car/ We play in the park are a similar situation. They're unrelated, but the words look alike.

August 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Ash473779

Thank you, I'm just curious if the two similar sounding words had the same etymology, as they sound so similar. English obviously has many homophones but their phonetic similarities are not reflected so much in the spelling, they once sounded different in spoken language as well and in the case of 'park', the noun and the verb, both are derived from the same original word, and this relation explains why they are the same word.

August 14, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/2GreyCats

Oh, I see. I was misreading what you were asking. And I haven't enough background in German historical linguistics to be able to answer it. Guten Morgen!

August 14, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/PaulMcCann6

Umm... the same way that the sentence "The fan blew on me" can mean two completely different things, depending on whether or not you're a rock star?

December 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/JoelOlano2

Beautiful reply...

April 8, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Ash473779

Well that's what I'm asking, for the context. the English double meaning could have came about as an incognito way to refer to a certain act but replacing the word with it's opposite to hide it's meaning from the ignorant. Do you know why this word has a double meaning?

December 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/zengator

Because English und Deutsch are human languages and--like humans--are filled with ambiguity, irrationality, and confusion.

Some things just are. I'm certain there are many papers and studies by linguists on the origins and evolution of homonyms (and homophones and homographs), but understanding the why is probably of little benefit in the practical application of the language.

As far as the context:
> - heiße is either the verb heißen conjugated for the first person, singular, or the adjective heiß inflected for a singular feminine or plural object.
- die is not a noun or a pronoun, and so is not the actor using the verb heißen conjugated in any manner
- there is already, unambiguously, a verb in the sentence: ist
Thus, heiße must be serving as an adjective.

Klar?

March 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Official-EU

The Germans have come together to meet about making their language complicated, this time they will make "heisse" have two meanings.

October 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/kstrtmn

I'm sure every language does this (more than one meaning for a word). In English we would say, The soup is hot," (meaning heat hot) and we would also say, "Wow, that woman is hot!" (meaning extremely beautiful), or even "That stuff is hot." (that stuff is stolen).

August 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Owlspotting

Any ideas on why this sentence is on the Adverb lesson?

April 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/zengator

Perhaps because lecker is an adverb. More info here.

April 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Owlspotting

But since it's the Adverb lesson, it seems that a sentence with the adverbial usage would be warranted.

April 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/zengator

Perhaps. Or perhaps die Eule thinks it is important to demonstrate that certain words can be used as both.

Oder Dinge sind möglicherweise ein bisschen zufällig.

April 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/LazyCouchTato

I thought that HEIßE meant TO BE CALLED?

April 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/zirkul
  • 1482

If it's a verb - yes: Ich heiße X.
Do you also get confused about the meaning of the word "lead" in English?

April 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/DeutscheRookie

Which form of "lead" do you mean? "Lead" has multiple meanings. For example, "I lead the team." means to guide. This form rhymes with seed. The problem with lead is that it can be spelled the same way, but have different meanings and sounds. The "lead" in, "I lead the team." can also mean some used to lead. This lead sounds like red.

"I am holding lead." is a noun. Lead is a metal in English. Also in this form it is pronounced "Led". It rhymes with red.

I am no linguist, but I hope this helped. Goodbye/Auf Wiedersehen!

May 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/zirkul
  • 1482

This lead sounds like red.

Actually, the past form of "to lead" is "led", not "lead" (don't confuse it with the past form of "to read", which is pronounced as "red" but is still spelt as "read").

But pronunciations aside, my whole point was that the context and the sentence structure should unambiguously tell you which "lead" are we talking about. Yet the analogous situation with "heiße" appears to confuse some people...

May 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/DeutscheRookie

Wow, that's embarrassing. Even native English speakers mess up the language. Haha. Englisch ist schwer.

May 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Pam_T

In previous versions of American English, it has always been "led". It is incorrect to use "lead" as past tense, but some people try to, and pronounce it "led". However, for a description of something that includes the metal "lead", there is an adjective of "leaded" (pronounced 'led-ed'). And the past tense of "plead" rhyming with "read", was "plead", rhyming with "led". But newspapers and tv news have changed since I was a kid, to allow for a change of the past tense "plead" to "pleaded", rhyming with "read-ed". There are other examples of this, and I do not know why. But there are many, many examples of two words spelled exactly the same that mean different things, sometimes pronounced differently, and sometimes not, meaning changed just based upon context of the sentence. In other words, English sucks. Sorry, non-native speakers!

By the way, are you saying that Heisse is pronounced differently in this instance?

May 29, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/zengator

Apparently, "pleaded" is the standard form for the past tense of "plead". "Pled" (different spelling) is considered non-standard, although widely used, particularly in legal context.

One may find a concise discussion here by the Grammarist.

May 29, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/zirkul
  • 1482

By the way, are you saying that Heisse is pronounced differently in this instance?

No, I am not saying that. (For one, German is far more phonetic than English, so spelling and pronunciation are typically very strongly correlated.) All I am saying is that it is hard for me imagine a situation where one would get confused between the meanings of "lead" even if it's merely written, not pronounced. Yet here we go with "heiße"...

August 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Chuckk7

Incidentally, more frequently used verbs tend to remain irregular, while less common ones tend to become regular. See also "dreamed," & "leaped."

May 23, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/LazyCouchTato

Yeah

April 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/aself69

I object as another commentator did: lecker means delicious so the sentence can be translated "The hot soup is delicious." DL provided no option to report the error.

January 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/NickDillon1

My german friend told me that 'heiße' is actually 'hotter', not just hot...

December 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Raisinnoir

I'm pretty sure "hotter soup" would be "heissere Suppe".

December 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Malik449009

That's false, it would be "heißer"

June 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Raisinnoir

No, it's quite correct.

July 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/margusoja

Malik is still correct :) "heißer" means "hotter". But of course, with feminine nouns like "Suppe" you should use the form "heißere Suppe".

July 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/MrMattyMatt

The hot soup tastes good. is wrong?? Why?

January 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/zengator

Because the more accurate translation is "The hot soup is tasty."

I've heard the tenet: "As literal as possible, as free as necessary." When translating between German and English, because of the shared heritage, it is quite often possible to translate word for word, and that works best here.

March 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/rjjacob

"... is tasty" is acceptable English usage, but somewhat precious. ".. tastes good" is more common. "... ist lecker" is much more usual among Germans, but "... schmekt gut" is, again, more common.

March 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Schwadfille

Why is the hot soup is yummy wrong?

May 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/zengator

It's not, but not every synonym for "tasty" is included in the possible answers die Eule checks us against.

But if one looks at the etymology of lecker, one will find it derives from lecken ("to lick"), and thus "tasty" (since that's what we do with our tongues) is probably the best translation.

May 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Pam_T

In some sentences "lecker" translated to "yummy." Why is that wrong here?

April 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/flyingdolphin

yeah i did that but it said i was wrong.

May 27, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Reinierpf

What do you have against“the hot soup is nice“

June 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/zengator

Lecker does not mean "nice". It means "tasty". "Nice" is better translated as nett.

June 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Reinierpf

Really. So you would have "eine nette Tasse Tee", would you? 'cause I'm having a nice cup of tea. With a bun. Which is also quite nice. A nice cup of tea is exactly the right temperature, the right colour, and tastes, well, nice.

June 15, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/zengator

Fitting, isn't it, that nice is more bland than tasty.

June 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/SydneyBlak4

But "nice" in this context is colloquial English and more often used than tasty.

August 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/zengator

Neither of those facts make "nice" a better translation of lecker than "tasty".

Dict.cc thinks so too.

August 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/zirkul
  • 1482

With a bun

Just please don't tell me that you've also added milk to your tea, because that would be a real abomination ;-)

June 15, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Pulkit.S15

Lecker = schmeckt gut?

July 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo

ist lecker and schmeckt gut are similar.

Note that lecker is an adjective and schmecken is a verb, so you can't say diese Suppe ist schmeckt gut or diese Supper leckert.

July 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/keerthipes

where is the adverb here? heise=hot is explaining the noun soup. so it must be adjective. And adverb cant exist alone so lecker=tasty is also adjective. please explain me this

October 17, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/zirkul
  • 1482

There is no adverb here. What makes you think there should be one?

October 17, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo

The sentence belongs to the Adverbs skill.

But not all sentences in a “grammar” skill use the grammar taught there; some merely use vocabulary which is introduced there.

October 17, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Saryun4

Aside from "hot" and "be called", Does it also carry the meaning of verb "to heat"?

December 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo

No. To heat is erhitzen -- related to Hitze "heat" rather than heiß "hot".

December 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/ZacharyUng

How can you tell the difference between the "Z" sound and the "ß" sound?

December 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/kenny.kalar

Not sure if this is correct but, the 'z' kind of vibrates your teeth while 'ß' is more like a hard 's' sound.

like the difference between "eyes" and "ice"

January 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/zirkul
  • 1482

???
German "z" makes a sound which is equivalent to English "ts" (or "zz" in "pizza"). Neither "eyes" nor "ice" have that sound.
Meantime, German 'ß' is basically an "ss" sound (that is, it does not sound like a single "s" in e.g. "nose" but instead like "ss" in "class").

April 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/kenny.kalar

Thank you for the correction.

I was thinking of the difference between 's' and 'ss'.

April 29, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Official-EU

Z = English Tss. ß = English long S sound, like a snake hissing.

October 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/BrazilianGus

I don't understand. Is heiße an adverb too? What in this phrase is an adverb?

June 29, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/zengator

Heiße is an adjective. It modifies the noun, Suppe.

Lecker is an adjective as well in this sentence. But it can also be an adverb.

This is one of the fun aspects of translation: although lecker means "tasty" when it's an adjective, it means "well" or "with pleasure" when it's used as an adverb. This is also why people are better translators than computers.

June 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo

lecker means "well" or "with pleasure" when it's used as an adverb?

Are you confusing German with Dutch, perhaps? (I believe "slaap lekker!" is a thing there.)

I can't think of a sentence where lecker is used as an adverb in German, let alone with the meaning of "with pleasure" -- do you have an example?

June 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/zengator

In dieser Wirtschaft kann man lecker essen.

From this entry in the Wiktionary.

June 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/zirkul
  • 1482

But in this particular example, lecker clearly refers to the gastronomical pleasure, which is in no way dissimilar to its meaning as an adjective. On the other hand, "well" or "with pleasure" can be used in much a broader variety of contexts. So I don't think this example supports your statement.

June 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/zengator

Perhaps it can only be used in a gastronomical context, but it is still functioning as an adverb, which is something "tasty" cannot do.

July 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/zirkul
  • 1482

@zengator:

Unlike (proper) English, German makes no distinction between adjectives and adverbs, so I don't find this too surprising.

July 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/edono

I wrote : "The hot soup is yummy" and got it wrong?

July 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/VaulsonNeoleon1

Ich heiße heiße Suppe

September 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Riad888971

I ve written The warm soup is tasty and as wrong word appeared warm. Heise can be translated as warm and as hot!!!!

October 7, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/zengator

Really?

Strange: neither Duden nor Wiktionary nor dict.cc indicate as such.

Perhaps you can provide some reference to support your belief.

October 7, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/art97590

Wouldn't it be "diese heisse suppe" instead of "die heisse suppe"? If it is indeed die how can one tell wheter or not the article refers to this or the hot soup?

October 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo

In speech, the word die would usually be stressed if it means "this" or "that", and would usually be unstressed if it means "the".

In writing, you can't tell the difference except through context.

But it's not a problem in general.

October 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/mmlak

I listened over and over, but on my device, the 'p' sound in the word 'suppe' sounded exactly like a 'k' sound! I thought it SHOULD be suppe, but it clearly wasn't . I decided it must be a word whose meaning I did not know!!

December 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/wutever0

I think adding sentences that do not have an adverb (and i think there are many) in the Adverb skill is a waste of adverbial exercises and also causes confusion because it invites us to consider certain words as adverbs when they are not.

February 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Lukas_Bel

Why is "The hot soup tastes delicious." wrong?

February 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/zengator

It imparts close to the same meaning, but I would consider "delicious" to express a stronger feeling than "tasty".

February 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/kingreb1

I writed warm instead of hot and got wrong, Why?

March 15, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/zengator

See Riad888971's identical question above.

March 15, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Chuckk7

"Tasty" is awfully over-used by non-native speakers. Where I come from, this is childspeak. "Delicious" is far more normal, but marked wrong.

May 23, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Staceface57

Heiße as a verb means "to call" Heiße as an adjective means "hot"

June 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo

heißen does not mean "to call" in modern German. Nowadays, it's only used in the meaning "to be called".

For example, ich heiße Hans "I am called Hans", but we wouldn't say ich heiße meinen Hund Hans "I call my dog Hans" any more.

June 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/leoagneau

Do both of the article "Die" and adjective "heiße" need to be declined according to the noun "Suppe", instead of just the article?

June 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo

It's a bit more complicated than that -- die has to match Suppe, and then heiße has to match both Suppe and die.

That is, the ending of heiße depends not only on the gender of Suppe, but also on the presence of the word die (which causes weak inflection on the adjective, while absence of a definite article would cause strong inflection instead).

June 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnnyEatsBaeume

Nacken

June 28, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/abbas287060

Delectable is the synonym for tasty and delicious .

July 17, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/YoussefLeo

Heisse vs. Heiss? Is it because Suppe is feminine?

August 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo

Suppe is feminine and the adjective has a definite article die in front of it -- so it takes weak inflection. (The definite article shows the gender/number/case, so the adjective doesn't have to do so.)

The weak adjective ending for nominative singular (for all genders) is -e.

heiß is not possible because it's an attributive adjective (before a noun), and thus has to have some ending.

August 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/ChrisCader

I tried using warm instead, but that is wrong?

August 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/zirkul
  • 1482

Warm=warm; heiß=hot.
Different temperature -- different words, in both languages.

August 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/ChrisCader

yeah i figured it out with a similar question. Thanks for your help. I am norwegian so i dont focus much on my own language.

August 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/panjaitanjane

Du bist heiße

September 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/isaac677973

The hot soup is good should be accepted. Delicious, yummy, and tasty are exaggerated.

October 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/drdodds4

This is getting as bad as the "Ich höre und sehe nichts" sentence!!

November 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/MarcusCoop8

how can 'my name is' possibly also mean 'hot'? man german is sooooo confusing. I mean, if it was just referring to me, 'my name' and 'hot' would mean the same thing but 99% of the time, it just makes no sense whatsoever.

November 14, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo

Do you know the joke about the blind carpenter?

He picked up his hammer and saw!

It’s funny because “saw” is the past tense of “see”, and completely coincidentally is also the name for a carpenter’s tool.

Or, you know how “like” means “similar to”, as in “that cloud looks like a sheep = that cloud looks similar to a sheep”? So why doesn’t “I like sports” mean “I similar to sports”?

Man, English is sooooo confusing.

Words can have multiple meanings, often completely unrelated ones. German isn’t the only “offender” here.

November 15, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Becky332188

I cat make the letter in hot so quit returning to the same sentence

September 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/tarek771330

Heiβ = hot, because the is feminine we add e die heiβe

December 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo

That’s not the reason—it’s weak inflection after the definite article, and the ending would be -e regardless of the gender, e.g. der heiße Saft, die heiße Suppe, das heiße Essen.

December 17, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/MaorioM

What are the differences between heiße and heiß? The dictionary says that both of the two words mean hot.

December 17, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo

heiß is the basic form of the word.

When you put an adjective before a noun, though, as an attributive adjective, then it has to take an ending.

Which ending it needs depends on the gender, number, and case of the word as well as on the word before the adjective, but you can't just stick an adjective before a noun without any ending at all. (With a few exceptions, of course.)

So you would say Die Suppe ist heiß. (no ending on heiß here since it's after the verb "to be) but die heiße Suppe (with ending since it's before a noun).

December 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Hans627685

Er spricht zu schnell. And mumbled. He cuts off the first word and I can't understand him, but when you hit the 'Sprechen Sie langsam' button, it sounds like he is giving you so much attitude

January 25, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/LeighNanan

How to slant text

March 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo

With Markdown: *italics* **bold** ***bold italics*** italics bold bold italics

March 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/GymnasticGirl07

MarijanaFlego .I had alsow the soup is delicious but it was not wrong.

April 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/TKDgirl94

I believe 'the hot soup is good' should also be excepted, though it marked me as wrong. That's what you would say in English.

July 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/zengator

One could say "the hot soup is good", but that does not have the same meaning as "the hot soup is tasty", and so should not be accepted.

July 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/beagoodone

Today I finally found out a secret

The secret why when you called my name, I got heated each time : )

November 14, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Cacbjiik

OK. So next time I say 'Ich heisse Cacbjiik' could also mean that I am both hot and to be called Cacbjiik!

January 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo

No.

ich heiße only means "my name is..." and has nothing to do with being hot.

Much as "I like cats" does not mean that you are like a cat -- from the sentence structure, it's clear that "like" is a verb, not a preposition, in that sentence.

January 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/WilliamM.G

DL -- change it up please. I am tired of seeing the hot soup is tasty. Please.

January 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Istvan175299

What I mean is that tasty or tasteful is all the same.

January 21, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/zengator

No. Not at all.

Tasty refers to the flavors a food or drink has.

"Tasteful" describes something that is aesthetically pleasing or conforming to expectations or ideals of what is appropriate.

January 21, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/olayiwolas1

Duo once said heiße means 'called' why now means 'hot'. My German English dictionary says heiß means 'hot' while, heiße means 'called'. Some should please explain. Danke!

April 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/zengator

And someone already has.

You should always take the time to read through the comments before posting a question.

April 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/olayiwolas1

Next time always know the approach to answer ones question because your comment sounds insulting. All in all thanks

April 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/zengator

No insult intended. Just a gentle reminder (to all) that many times someone has already asked a question, and someone else has taken the time to answer it.

Additionally, I've often found other questions that I hadn't yet realized I had are answered in the comments.

Herzliche Grüße.

April 22, 2017
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