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  5. "Der Mann kocht die Bohnen."

"Der Mann kocht die Bohnen."

Translation:The man is cooking the beans.

June 19, 2016

34 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/external.j

I always shortly freak out when we have Bohnensuppe in the canteen, until I recall Bohnen is not bones. €:


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BirgitAsh

A collegue of mine once had an English speaking visitor. When asked what she was cooking, she said: "Tomato soup with mais" (= corn). He replied: "Crazy Germans", as he had understood: "Tomato soup with mice" (= Mäusen). =;o)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Strobro3

Beans beans beans;

The magical fruit;

The more you eat,

The more you toot.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OldSpiceGuy

The more you toot, the better you feel. So eat your beans with every meal!


[deactivated user]

    ─=≡Σ((( つ>▽<)つ


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/limors47

    I know a slightly different version:

    Beans beans, they're good for your heart

    The more you eat, the better you fa....... grow.


    [deactivated user]

      Do I really have to have the article in the answer?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FrankelPopankel

      If it's included in the question, yes, at least in my experience.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Malik449009

      The way articles are used in english amd german is nearly the same, so you should to conserve the original meaning


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kiomarv7

      Favabohnen mit ausgezeichnetem Chianti und Leber?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/0408mike

      Doesn't 'kochen' also mean 'to boil;?


      [deactivated user]

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/0408mike

        Thanks Peter, Duolingo marked boil as incorrect.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

        https://dictionary.reverso.net/english-german/Boil

        To boil is sometimes translated by kochen, but kochen covers more than just “boil” which is just one form of cooking. It is most often “to cook.” Since boiling is a kind of cooking, I would rather translate the German word to “cooks”, while the English word boils could still be translated to “kocht”.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        In reference to water, yes.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rodrik1406

        How often do Germans eat beans? It must be more than "ocassionally" for it to be included on this list? Or is it simply such a universal food that it would be wrong to not teach it? Please Germans I'm genuinely curious :)


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/0408mike

        If you haven't tried 'saure Bohnen' you haven't lived.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Malik449009

        I am German and never did


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CaroleJone10

        in English you would say the man cooks beans no need for the definite article i think


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

        In German, you could do without the article also though. These beans must be a specific group of beans.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/courtney942355

        How can you tell if its "man' or 'husband'?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        In general: if there's a possessive adjective ("my, your" etc.) in front of it, translate Mann as "husband", otherwise as "man".

        There's no possessive here, so it's "man".


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Julianna957235

        -the sound of hundreds of screaming beans-


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Boban992

        Why die instead of den, its acusative


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        It's accusative, yes -- but plural accusative.

        den is masculine singular accusative.

        Feminine singular, neuter singular, and all nouns in the plural have nominative = accusative.

        Thus plural accusative is die like the nominative.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Patrick191362

        Why isnt husband also correct?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        Because there's no possessive context that would imply that meaning.

        mein Mann = my husband but der Mann = the man.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/James953677

        Dieser nibba isst bohnen


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maneblusser

        German sounds too Dutch sometimes. I thought of "bought", when I heard 'kocht', but obviously that is the wrong translation. If 'kocht' is "cooked", then what is "bought" in German?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        It’s regular in German: kaufen - kaufte - gekauft.

        “To cook” is also regular: kochen - kochte - gekocht.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vlada296310

        Can be coffee beans.

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