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  5. "Das sind sehr aktive Lehrer."

"Das sind sehr aktive Lehrer."

Translation:These are very active teachers.

January 30, 2014

32 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cmow_lowry

I feel like the english 'They are...' is more often and naturally used than 'These are...' Is there are reason for using 'These'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zengator

To me, "These are . . . " gives the sense that some teachers are being held out as examples. I can envision a principal giving out an award to a group of teachers at some ceremony. Seems natural enough.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MekugiAna

Both are usable depending on the context: "These/those are the plural forms of this/that, and behave in the same way. As a determiner 'this' is used to identify a specific person or thing close at hand or being experienced. As a determiner 'that' refers to the more distant of two things near to the speaker, or to a specific thing previously mentioned."

It's funny to me that German is less complex in this case, when when it's more complex in a lot of other cases :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tr0y3st

Its frusterating i used "those" and got it incorrect. the correct word would be based on context that isnt present, right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/margusoja

"They are" would be "Sie sind", not "Das sind".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElpisIsrael

I would use "dies-" for these, and translate "das" as those.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArvindhMani

...und wir sind sehr aktive Lerner! :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pada.online

I would rather say:

  • Und wir sind sehr aktive Schüler!
  • Und wir sind sehr aktive Lernende!

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zorrocaesar

Why not aktiven? Isn't this the plural?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pada.online

While "die aktiven Lehrer" (weak declension) is a valid term, "aktive Lehrer" without an article is strong declension (starke Deklination) in plural:


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Laruthell

Does this (German sentence) mean that the teachers get lots of exercise, or that they do a lot of teaching? (The English sentence could mean either.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pada.online

They put a lot of effort in preparing their lessons and make them very interesting for their pupils. They might also do excursion with their class and visit a theatre or museum.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SunnyDornoch

I thought plural nominative endings are all -en?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pada.online

No, it's not that simple. Adjective endings are affected by declension.

See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_declension


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SunnyDornoch

oo errr... thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DexX

Okay, I'm confused. Why not use "Lehreren" for this, as I thought that was the plural of "teacher", or "Lehrerinnen" for multiple female teachers?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/duoderSie

One male teacher = der/den/dem Lehrer or des Lehrers (genitive)

one female teacher = die/der Lehrerin

multiple female teachers = die/der/den Lehrerinnen

multiple teachers (at least one male) = die/der Lehrer or den Lehrern (dative)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DexX

Huh, so it is. Weird, I somehow learned the wrong plural form. Not sure how.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/duoderSie

Easy to do! The plurals in German are all over the place, and the extra -n for many nouns when in the plural-dative just makes it worse.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobertKleb

Has anybody else noticed she says, das sind sie...?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/klh67

are you referring to the fact that there is no plural for das in these cases? that bothers me, but I guess that's the way German works.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kkava

Does sehr never have declension?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArvindhMani

Never. Sehr is an adverb, which modifies an adjective. Only adjectives (since they act on the noun) are declined.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/duoderSie

Incidentally in German many adjectives are the same as the adverbs except they are not modified and quite a few native German speakers don't explicitly realise this. This explains why some with intermediate level English have problems choosing between eg. slow and slowly when speaking English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArvindhMani

Good point - Don't think I'd have realised it! Thanks for sharing! :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hekeln

'quite' translates as 'slightly' or 'not very' into British English. Does sehr mean 'very' here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tom.wald

I said "Those are pretty active teachers" and just wanted to point out that Americans sometimes use "pretty" as a modifier to mean "very" or "quite".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p

That'd be ziemlich.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sky17343

i heard die instead of sehr also why isnt it activen since its plural


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zengator

Yes, sometimes it can be a bit hard to pick up the individual words. Learning the spoken cadence and inflection of a foreign language can be difficult. Sometimes I have to listen several times or slow down the audio. I find it also helps if I listen to German for a few minutes--the Tagesschau.de videos are useful--even though I don't fully understand and can't keep up.

And, of course, the computer-generated audio is not perfect. So, the listening lessons will always be a bit problematic, but not insurmountable.

As for aktive rather than activen:

  • without the definite article (remember, you misheard sehr), the adjective must be inflected. This is referred to as "strong inflection".
  • neither "activen" nor "active" are German words.
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