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https://www.duolingo.com/Cumeon

Esperanto. How useful is it actually?

Cumeon
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How many of you guys actually speak Esperanto? I read somewhere that learning Esperanto might help you learn other latin-based languages like French or Spanish. Does anyone have any experiense like this? I really wanna learn it ,but it's so uncommon it's probably useless. But i find it cool to know a universal language.

P.S. I'm not really good with langauges, so if i start learning something it's gonna take a long time and a lot of effort, and i don't wanna spend it on something I'll regret.

2 years ago

30 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/johmue
  • I learned Esperanto to get access to a community of cool people.

  • I am using Esperanto every day to chat with cool people, to make podcasts, to make music, make love, discuss about all kinds of stuff. It's simply the language of my global friend circle.

  • No other foreign language - and I do speak some - has brought to me so many closed friendships from all around the world. It is by now one of my every day languages.

So yes, to me it turned out to be really useful.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cliff900
cliff900
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"the language of my global friend circle"

I like the idea of that statement. It seems a good way to think about it for me as well. Thanks!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cumeon
Cumeon
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Sounds pretty good. Do you know where it is mostly spoken, like country-wise?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/otsogutxi
otsogutxi
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I have heard it is very popular in Japan, China and Brazil.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cumeon
Cumeon
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Reasonable enough. I guess it's easier for asians to accept westerners with Esperanto in their countries without making them learn their very complex (but non the less beautiful) languages.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johmue

Hard to say. Maybe in Europe it's most interesting, because you can easily travel to foreign language region like for a weekend.

In practice it's not so much of importance where it is spoken most. More important is, where you are or where want to travel, what your interests are and what you expect to do with other Esperanto speakers.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/John00625
John00625
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Nowhere. There are a couple million Esperantists spread around the world though.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
salivanto
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The northeastern part of the USA is where it's at! :-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GrandaUrso

So we hear, so we hear ;)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JanPaulido
JanPaulido
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I have to say that if you are deliberately attempting to learn another language , and are new to that , then Esperanto will absolutely help you build language learning skills, i mean you will learn how to learn. You will become aware of elements of structure , grammar , be introduced to roots from other lamguages ( like you mentioned) , that will help later , and you get to learn Esperanto ..BONUS!!!! It is squared off in a major way ,, Esperanto estas bona lingvo , komencantoj ŝatas lerni ĝin

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cumeon
Cumeon
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I plan on giving it a try after my beloved Русский. I really wanted to learn it. Seems like a good skill to have. Especially after I heard it's not that difficult as a language to learn.

Thank you for the rely ^^

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JanPaulido
JanPaulido
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Nice , i am doing the opposite , esperanto then russian , maybe we will meet in the middle ;) , if you have any questions let me know and ill try to help , like any language it requires effort and persistence, but it is easier than any natural language

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mensogulo
mensogulo
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It will help you to understand the horrible Russian cases. The concept behind them and the resulting free word order in both languages is pretty the same.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JanPaulido
JanPaulido
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Are you sure that you are telling the truth ?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mensogulo
mensogulo
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I'm russian native speaker.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ontalor
Ontalor
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I mean, I just finished listening to a podcast of three people from Germany about the refugee crisis from a perspective I would never have been able to understand unless all three participants had spent a decade learning English or I had spent a decade learning German. And I've spent maybe a year or so on Esperanto. So it's all about what you're using it for.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johmue

You are probably refering to KP077 Rifuĝintoj. I have to add, that one of the three is Slovak and thus not German native.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ontalor
Ontalor
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Ĝuste! Kaj dankon! I actually had been trying to figure out what the native countries of the two main hosts are, but I can't remember them saying anywhere, and since they were all so familiar with Germany I just assumed they were German. I'm guessing Eva is Slovak?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KenCollins0

No one in the world would make nasty statements about a language, such as

"Only 50 people speak X" "No one is learning X" "X is a stupid language because it isn't Spanish" "X is ungrammatical because it doesn't follow the grammar rules of Y" "X is awful because I can't read it without learning it first" "X has no culture whatsoever" "X isn't a real language" "There is no point to learning X"

or whatever. Some can be disproved with a simple Google search and the rest are just rude. No one would say such things about a language—unless the language is Esperanto.

The Hungarian Academy of Sciences has determined that Esperanto is a living language. The International Academy of Sciences in San Marino uses Esperanto as its language of instruction and administration and confers accredited degrees. Google it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shamirush

I have to contradict you here:

No one in the world would make nasty statements about a language,

such as "Only 50 people speak X" "No one is learning X"

When I lived in Europe I heard that often from Spanish people about people learning Catalan and Basque. I had similar experiences too with English/Irish people talking about Gaelic.

And if we go to Latin America or Africa for sure we will see that often local languages have the same consideration.

Maybe Esperanto has the same status problem than other minority languages.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BastouXII
BastouXII
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I've heard that many times about French, living in Canada. You know, the world lingua franca until WWII (before English took over the first spot)? Yeah, that language.

2 years ago