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  5. "בבקשה!"

"בבקשה!"

Translation:Please!

June 21, 2016

29 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John00625

So, Please and you're welcome is the same? How do you tell the difference between the two? Or is the hover-hint misleading me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cyanivde

They are the same, though there are other translations for "you are welcome": "על לא דבר", "אין בעד מה". In most cases, "בבקשה" means please. Context will help you tell these cases apart.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/derekrwills

so is בבקושה not typically used for "you're welcome" and almost exclusively used for "please?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GeutH

I disagree with Airelibre. When someone says "תודה" to me, my response is usually "בבקשה". (:


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/irenerab

Yes, Geoot. Same here and that is the usual. Situational usage...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Sruly

It is kind of in the tone of the speaker, it is like "sorry" and "excuse me" (סליכה) It depends on how you say it with a question-y tone or a statement-y tone :P (In my experience)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cyanivde

סליחה* :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Sruly

Oh thanks ahahah :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/julian665012

Except for "sorry" and "excuse me" can both be used in the same context in action, whereas, "please" and "thank you" have two different reasons for being said. I was confused with why the meaning meant, "you're welcome" when Ive always known it as, "please."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tabidanielle

It's the same way in Russian and the best way to think of it is an implied ending. Ex. Please[, it was no problem]


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Spirit300

It's all in the context. I hear it used both ways all of the time.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ouranikos

That's not very uncommon. It's the same in German.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lauren_no_il

Basically yes, Onthehype25, but there are synonyms for "You're welcome", yet there are no synonyms for "Please".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/InonCohen

There are, but they are higher register and far less common


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alantrousers

In Russian the same thing applies. The same word can be used to mean both please and you're welcome.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/airelibre

It's probably because of Russian that it exists. Modern Hebrew has many similarities with Russian (among other languages of course).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YardenNB

Or German, Hebrew borrowed a lot from both languages between 19th and early 20th century.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/airelibre

True in general (note that I wrote “among other languages”), but I thought that in this particular case German had a clear separation between danke and bitte?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YardenNB

But we're not talking about "danke", we're talking about "bitte" as (1) signifying a polite request (2) a reply to "danke".

Actually בבקשה is very close to "bitte" literally, while not being so close to пожалуйста if https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%D0%BF%D0%BE%D0%B6%D0%B0%D0%BB%D1%83%D0%B9%D1%81%D1%82%D0%B0#Etymology is correct. True though that even if Hebrew didn't borrow the first use of the two from Russian it may still have borrowed the secondary use.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/airelibre

Okay, that’s what I was asking :-) Didn’t know that bitte was used the same way.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rafy65146

You could think of it as someone saying "thanks" to you and you replying בבקשה "oh, please, don't mention it".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/leth_marc

What's the literal meaning of this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NaftaliFri1

Something like "in (manner of) asking/request",


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LaraDP1

I wish we could type with the vowels and extra little dots (I forget the name) words like this would be easier to learn.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lauren_no_il

Duolingo is for people to learn to write and speak the language as the native speakers do. This is why the writing of the word is as it is in Hebrew language, although it would indeed be easy if we were to put Dageshim inside letters to help remember.

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