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"בתיאבון!"

Translation:Bon appetit!

2 years ago

71 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/mwillner

The hebrew should be automatically pronounced. It would also be great of there was a way to slow down the pronounciation like in the Spanish course.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hsn626796
Hsn626796
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It would be a great favor if the pronounciation can indeed be slowed !

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WarriorCleberz
WarriorCleberz
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I reported this problem and the missing sound below the images in the questions several times, can be some problem in TTS system, I don't know exactly. The correct pronunctiation is very important for learning, I'll continue to report up to fix it.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shaunsmile
shaunsmile
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There's no TTS for Hebrew (at least yet). Every sentence is recorded.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WarriorCleberz
WarriorCleberz
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Ok, thanks by your answer. But, are you sure of it?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shaunsmile
shaunsmile
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Yes. The second question in the FAQ answers this officially: https://www.duolingo.com/comment/16292319

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WarriorCleberz
WarriorCleberz
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Thanks a lot again for share it. I'll see it.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NRPL123
NRPL123
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This is a very useful website for hearing pronunciation. https://forvo.com/languages/he/ You can copy from Duo and paste there, and it has pronunciation for many words and phrases. You can't slow it down, but you can play it over and over and listen hard for different parts of the word.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marcocanel10
marcocanel10
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thanks for the information...i did not know it was possible to slow down the pronounciation in the spanish course......thanks a lot

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IlyaAls
IlyaAls
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Is this used for starting to eat?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ploomich
PloomichPlus
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yes

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ektoraskan

Is the י pronounced at all?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ploomich
PloomichPlus
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No. I think that its role in this case is just to emphasize the tzere ( ֵ ). You can ignore it since the pronounciation is "be-te-a-von".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ektoraskan

Thanks :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elgreen

It's like a silent 'e' in English. This י is what makes the vowel under the ת sound like 'ay' as in 'play' instead of 'eh' as in 'bed'. It isn't pronounced on it's own. It's a little confusing without the vowel points.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NaftaliFri1
NaftaliFri1
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See "Full spelling" section of Letters 3 Tip & Notes

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lord_Xnaut

Beteyavon

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NaftaliFri1
NaftaliFri1
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Anyone familiar with a proper English way to say this? I've heard "Hardy appetite", but I don't know how much that's used today.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ploomich
PloomichPlus
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"Enjoy your meal!" (:

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NaftaliFri1
NaftaliFri1
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I would accept that

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hsn626796
Hsn626796
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Just saying, I always wondered about an equivalent to the Arabic word "صحّتين" (sahhteyn) in English, but I never came across one as close as the hebrew word בתיאבון .

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Humamslayer12
Humamslayer12
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Why do you think that Hsn ? , because the are only written as one word ?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Psalm_23
Psalm_23
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We might say "Enjoy your meal" or "Bon appetit." It's also okay to say just "Enjoy!" (But we can say "Enjoy!" with anything we give to another person to use; it is used for many things besides meals.) I've never heard "Hearty appetite" used alone, only in sentences such as "He has a hearty appetite" (which means "He eats a lot!"). See http://www.dictionary.com/browse/hearty for this usage--it's number 8.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NaftaliFri1
NaftaliFri1
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Just thinking, it should probably be "hearty"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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No, it is an adjective and not a verb and is not used by itself.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/b_jamil
b_jamil
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I see there are a few others from the UK who have already commented, I'll just add my voice - "bon appetit" (with a hard t at the end) is very common, as is "enjoy your meal", and I've never heard or read of "hearty appetite" being used except as Psalm_23 explained.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/YanklSalan
YanklSalan
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It's actually "hearty appetite"

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GuySalomon

Pretty sure bon appetit is French, not English.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chris627136

It's UK English (well, you're right that it is technically French, but it's universal in UK English), but maybe not in US English?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/carter.ag
carter.ag
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It's perfectly acceptable in American English as well.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JayStanton
JayStanton
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And widely used in some contexts

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/judderwocky

Simply because a phrase is well known or accepted doesn't make it part of a language. A lot of people say "Feliz Navidad" ... It doesn't mean that's English.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JayStanton
JayStanton
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Yet unlike Feliz Navidad, which, while acceptable in some English dialects, retains its Spanish characteristics because there is a way to express the same phrase in English, "bon appetit" does not retain its French context within English because it has been thoroughly integrated in the absence of a similar English phrase. A better analogue is with names of food dishes. For example, sushi is an English word even though its origin isn't English.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/judderwocky

So your argument for this being English is that nobody knew how to say "enjoy your meal" before the French told us how? What bologna.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/R3ebsugt

Just like a lot of our words (English) come from Latin, so too this came from French. It's still used as an English phrase.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marcella409601

There needs to be consistent introduction of words with definitions/translations when a word is first used. Otherwise, we are just guessing.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NaftaliFri1
NaftaliFri1
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Duolingo is interesting in that manner, but usually the words of the exercise are underlined, and if you click you are shown the translation.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marcella409601

That is exactly what I'm asking for here. There are words being introduced without that underlined option, heh. I'm requesting that words are introduced in a consistent manner.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ilanan

I just said "enjoy"; I would have thought the meal was implicit....

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ploomich
PloomichPlus
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this word is specifically used for meals. תיאבון means something like appetite, and ב is a preposition.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/poppyseedbagel
poppyseedbagel
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itadakimasu

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Laureen119454

They ask for the English translation and when I write Good Appetite, it tells me I’m wrong, that the correct English is Bon Appetit! That is not English, that is French! Driving me nuts!

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Manu952778

While this is used in the US the phrase Bon Appetit is French

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/John00625
John00625
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Je peux voir qu'ils ont mis la version française ainsi!

I can see they included the french version as well!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vdj1050
vdj1050Plus
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And it's "aussi" and not "ainsi" !

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chris627136

In the UK, we use a lot of French expressions in everyday usage, even if we don't speak French.. Everyone I know says "bon appetit!" before a meal (and we pronounce it "bon-appa-tee", which isn't too different to the French pronounciation).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adamyoung97
adamyoung97
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"Je vois qu'ils ont inclu" is better here, I think (I know this isn't even a French course lol)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/John00625
John00625
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Sorry, I've been focusing on Hebrew, I need to brush up on my french :C

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adamyoung97
adamyoung97
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Don't worry, and I think what you wrote was fine too! :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yochanan37

I wrote good appetite and it was wrong! I think that needs to be corrected.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NaftaliFri1
NaftaliFri1
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I haven't heard that being used. Did you, or you may tried a literal translation?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jin__wu
jin__wu
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Did this word originate from French?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NaftaliFri1
NaftaliFri1
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If you mean the English translation, then yes

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jin__wu
jin__wu
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I mean the Hebrew word "בתיאבון". It sounds somewhat like "bon appétit". Or is that just purely coincidental? :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NaftaliFri1
NaftaliFri1
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תיאבון is the Hebrew word for appetite.

So בתיאבון means "with appetite".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FaizaMazhar

Might be the other way around considering the history ov Hebrew.. "Ta'aam" is a word we use for food in Urdu,probably borrowed from Arabic..

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JayStanton
JayStanton
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The word טעם is used for taste in Hebrew. The root תאב, from which תיאבון and בתיאבון come, means desire, and is used for contexts which have to do with instinctive desires, such as hunger/appetite. The word תיאבון is ancient. It is highly likely that the phrase בתיאבון is similarly ancient.

While it is true that many of the influential figures in the development of modern Hebrew were Europeans who spoke or were well acquainted with French, one would expect the phrase to match meaning if borrowed. The mismatch, combined with the fact that "bon appetit" or its analogues were not used in Jewish dialects of European languages until very recently, suggest that בתיאבון is a longstanding traditional Hebrew phrase for the beginning of meal time, preserved in ritual context when that was the primary context for spoken Hebrew.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MicheleMiFi

טודה רבה

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jdeclerck

Hebrew is the oldest language that we know of. If there is a correlation, it would be the other way around.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lrziskind

It actually says bon appetit as an option!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Laraswife
Laraswife
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Bon Appetit is the only phrase I've heard used in English. We are not a nation known for our cuisine and many of our chefs are immigrants or at least trained somewhere else.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/designberg

Bon appetit is French. There is no English equivalent except the awkward "good appetite"

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Seth842290

In the US, "bon apetit" is used widely, but I think it has a... fanciful connotation, like when someone is acting playfully or when then want to sound posh. "Enjoy your meal", or more simply "eat up" or "tuck in" serve the same purpose.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/A-Lamanite

At first I thought it said the devil. I wish we had slow option....

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stanley718776

It is not really a English translation. I do not think it would used in many English speaking countries I suggest "enjoy the food"

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/laura499062

Can anyone confirm this is used in israel? Ive never heard it before

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MicheleMiFi

Yes, according to my experience. The expression is spoken frequently. It is a staple phrase because the people love eating and being together.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JayStanton
JayStanton
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Used widely in Israel

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/R3ebsugt

I thought בתיאבון was used to say like "see you later" or "next time"

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/R3ebsugt

What am I mixing the word up with?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DovCarey

why is French the only acceptable translation, good appetite works as well

2 weeks ago