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  5. "מרק עגבניות."

"מרק עגבניות."

Translation:Tomato soup.

June 22, 2016

30 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tim5602

Is tomato here used as an adjective?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cyanivde

No. It's a construct state ("סמיכות") – two nouns joined together to create one term.

In a way, it's like saying "a soup of tomatoes". The "of" is implied.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tim5602

Thanks, I understand!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ploomich

mind that in hebrew the word that changes to imply this is the first one, in this case the soup and not the tomatoes. (soup specifically stays מרק but a different word could have changed)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NaftaliFri1

Actually, the nikud of מרק did change...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ploomich

right, it should, but hebrew speakers normally just say marak and so is the case with the audio here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mehdi.Benhenia

The same word exists in Arabic written with the same three letters: مرق but it means "sauce". I love languages ___


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hsn626796

Agvanyot or Agvaniyot ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NaftaliFri1

Technically the latter, but both work.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hsn626796

How do you define "technically ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NaftaliFri1

According to the rules.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YardenNB

Are you sure you're achieving two different pronunciations there?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IngeborgHa14

Yes, it is offically עַגְבָנִיּוֹת, the other would be #עַגְבַנְיוֹת#. But the difference is too slight too matter in coherent speech.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Coreyhus

So, is this the genitive case in hebrew? What should the pronunciation of מרק be if the correct nikkud were there?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marjie46355

The word we originally learned for tomato looks like the plural. What is the singular form?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tim5602

Tomato - עגבנייה
Tomatoes - עגבניות


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IngeborgHa14

I would have said מְרַק־עַגְבָנִיּוֹת, with the soup (מָרָק) shortened to "mrak" (because of the following genitive)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YardenNB

That niqqud in the מ is called שווא נע. Probably at the time the niqqud was invented it was pronounced as a very short /e/ sound. I believe that very formal speakers (e.g. some news narrators in the radio) actually reproduce that sound, and that sounds very formal but correct. Pronouncing it without vowel at all (as implied by /mrak/) or a full blown /e/ sounds very strange and wrong to me. As said above, Hebrew speakers just say /marak/.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RoseDark94

marak agvaniyot


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Laika667404

Why is "a tomato soup" not a correct answer?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheEnglishAugust

I don't think there is a Genitive Case in Modern Hebrew.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YardenNB

Because the word that represents the thing being owned doesn't change. The change happens to the word representing the owner, and that's not how genitive works in languages with cases.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IngeborgHa14

Well, a genitive construction does not always needs a visible genitive case, which is long lost in Hebrew. Smikhut is a way, a language works without cases.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarleneKes1

Why is tomato in the plural here


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IngeborgHa14

Well, in products made of tomatoes, the tomatoes are normally a plural noun in the construct tail, the same with מִיץ־עַגְבָנִיּוֹת tomatoe juice f.e. It depends on the vegetable, you would make a מְרַק־יְרָקוֹת vegetable soup (plural), but on the other hand a מְרַק־גֶּזֶר carrot soup or a מְרַק־דְּלַ֫עַת pumpkin soup (singular)

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