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  5. "הילדים מוצאים את הממתקים ליד…

"הילדים מוצאים את הממתקים לידךְ."

Translation:The children find the candies next to you.

June 22, 2016

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zion11dotcom

ha yladim motzim et ha mamtakim leeadekh


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnCatDubh

candies = סֻכָּרִיּוֹת

candy/sweets = מַמְתָּקִים


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eromeon

I don't understand the difference. I'm not an English native speaker. Would you explain it, please?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rBhr5

Depends which English-speaking country you're from. Australians (and also, I suspect, the British) never use the word 'candies', and rarely 'candy'. 'Candy' is only used in specific contexts - eg 'candy-coloured clouds", but rarely as a noun on its own. Australians use the word 'lollies' or occasionally 'sweets' to refer to what Americans call either 'candy' or 'candies'. But sometimes when Americans use those terms, they really mean what we would call 'chocolate' or 'chocolates'. So simply equating 'candies' with סוכריות and 'candy/sweets' with ממתקים simply won't make any sense for non-American English speakers. I honestly can't differentiate the two.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Janis559500

Not just clouds: "candy-colored clown" comes from 1963 hit song, "In Dreams" written and sung by Roy Orbison.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dave712020

Why not "near you" as well as "next to you"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichaelJG7

My guess is that because יד means "hand", and is at a person's side.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YardenNB

Surely the etymology of ליד is from something like "available to the hand". But that's just etymology, we don't think of "hand" when we say ליד (it's actually surprising and delightful to Hebrew speakers the first time they hear about this etymology). It could have come to mean "near", "close"; but it so happened that Hebrew also has קרוב, and it so happened that speakers have preferred ליד for "very close" and קרוב for "close, not necessarily that close."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/clairelanc3

Why then did you accept "beside" in the other sentences?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hsn626796

Why have 7 questions in this practice exercise been arranged automatically for me without having to arrange the words ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YamirRomer

It has to do with hard and soft. In America candy/ies is more stiff products related.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GabeGewurt

should be "next to you" or "beside you" "לידך" What is strange is that I used the English "beside" instead of "next to" throughout the exercise and it was acceptable, except in this case?????


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GabeGewurt

'BESIDE YOU' SHOULD ALSO BE ACCEPTABLE AS WELL AS 'NEXT TO YOU'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NicoleMidk

I wrote discover and it didnt accept it. Discover = find.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YardenNB

Discover is not exactly find. For instance, it would be funny to ask "Did you discover your glasses in the end?". OTOH, if you say that you discovered the answer to some riddle, you hint that it was a novelty, that it was generally unknown before. "Find" can be used in this sense, but it also may be used if the answer is known to many, and you just found it now.

Hebrew has exact parallels to both, מצא and גילה, so there's a point in insisting on the exact match. (Fun fact: גילה has the same etymology of "discover" - remove the cover from something.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SenorDustin

Why are you hiding candy next to yourself for children to find?

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