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"הילדה אוכלת לחם מתוק."

Translation:The girl eats sweet bread.

2 years ago

28 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/dbalencar

"The girl eats a sweet bread" was not accepted. It's hard to guess when they want to add "a/an" or not.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kifudancer

That's not really a Duolingo issue, though, as much as it is just English being itself.

In most dialects of English, 'bread' doesn't take an article. It sounds funny to say, "I'm going to the store to buy a bread." Instead, you'd say, "...to buy bread." Or, if you wanted to specify an amount, you'd use "a loaf of bread/two loaves of bread". It doesn't actually matter that it takes an adjective, the rule for the article doesn't change.

Hence "a sweet bread" being marked wrong.

(And yes, you could argue that Duolingo could be less picky given it's a small thing and doesn't change the meaning, but that'd be a separate discussion.)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TobyBartels
TobyBartels
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Well, ‘a bread’ does have a meaning in English, which is a type of bread. So ‘The girl is eating a sweet bread.’ means that the type of bread that the girl is eating is typically sweet (not that the specific slice that she is eating is sweet, although it would tend to be).

Whether the Hebrew can mean that, I don't know.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Auriel797502

The Hebrew wouldn't really mean that. Because there is no word for "a", you would have to physically say "a type of sweet bread" so the phrase would be "הילדה אוכלת סוג של לחם מתוק"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NatashaSha386361

That's a question about English, not Hebrew. In English, bread is usually a collective noun.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/msElroy

What's the transliteration of מתוק?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/radagastthebrown

matók

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cranberry.-.

How do you say 'sweet bread' as in thymus or pancreas?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/radagastthebrown

What do you mean? Is that a kind of dish? (Brain is מוח if that helps)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cranberry.-.

Yes. Google search definition... Sweetbreads or ris are culinary names for the thymus or the pancreas, especially of calf and lamb, and, less commonly, of beef and pork.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarakSaltz
BarakSaltz
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"Sweetbreads" is why I translate "pan dulce" or "panecito" from Spanish into English as "pastry bread" or simply have the Spanish terms be untranslated in combination with italicization.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cranberry.-.

I guess that wold work here too, but do you know if there is a word for it in Hebrew? (For curiosities sake?)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarakSaltz
BarakSaltz
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Useful topic words:

לבלב (pancreas)

טימוס (thymus)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rachel928214
Rachel928214
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I have never heard the phrase "pastry bread" in English before.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rachel928214
Rachel928214
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Eating organ meat is not kosher, so there might not be a commonly used phrase encompassing them. I don't know.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jewpsy
Jewpsy
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That's simply not true. It's more difficult to make organ meat kosher (because it contains a lot of blood), but it's still very common to eat them

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/UUCI5

Why does it say t "eating bread sweet" and not sweet bread. Like wtf?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NatashaSha386361

In Hebrew, an adjective follows the noun it modifies. But in English the adjective precedes the noun. I hope this helps.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/1042878599

The girl eats a sweet bread.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cDYy10

הילדה אוכלת לחם מתוק

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/emili183885

This is too hard for this level

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/quadrin
quadrin
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Does sweet bread even exist?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/airelibre
airelibre
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2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dieprinzessin
dieprinzessin
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Challah plural: challot /xɒloʊt/ or challos /xɒləs/, is a special Jewish braided bread eaten on .... the cycle of the year, and baked with raisins in the dough. Sometimes the top is brushed with honey to symbolize the "sweet new year."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Challah

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/quadrin
quadrin
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That's cool! So sweet bread is challa? I've heard of it!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cranberry.-.

No, but Challah can be made sweet if so desired. (as can any other sort of bread) By adding raisins, honey etc.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shesh10
Shesh10
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Well, no raisins nowdays, but Challa is a type of bread which is sweet.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/meira_lisette

We always make two loaves a week, one with raisins and one without, at least here in our house... Differing tastes in differing households I suppose. However, challah for Rosh HaShana almost always has raisins in it. :)

2 years ago