1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Hebrew
  4. >
  5. "אתה אוכל סלט עגבניות."

"אתה אוכל סלט עגבניות."

Translation:You eat a tomato salad.

June 22, 2016

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aadambialas

So why do you say מרק עגבניה but סלט עגבניות? Is it just how you say it in hebrew or is there some rule behind it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NaftaliFri1

I think עגבניות is more common for both ("soup of tomatoes")

Using the single form implies generality ("soup made of the tomato vegetable") and so can be used, but it seems less common. I don't know if I ever heard it with "salad"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TeribleT

It sounds like salahtgvinot. Usually I can hear the separate words, is this just me? Is the first time I couldn't hear the separation. And I speak insanely fast. Like my dad still can't understand me & I've been speaking for decades.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Janis559500

I clearly hear him say saLAT agvaniOT. I don't see a date on these posts, so you may have done this one very early in your work with Duolingo Hebrew. Either that or they revised the audio.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sun.of.GOD

Thats why i got it wrong...smh


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jarrettph

Tomato salad! Never heard of that before. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OzzieOnkno

tomatoes with mozzarella cheese and basil and olive oil.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JayStanton

You're in for a treat!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shoshanah531034

I put salad tomato :-(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CaioFranca2

Is this sentence okay?: הילדה ואני אוכלים סלת עגבניות תעים


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YardenNB

Great! Just two typos: סלט and טעים.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChromateX

Is עגבניות in the genitive case?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/airelibre

Hebrew doesn’t have cases but I can sort of see where you are coming from.

Hebrew has smikhut compounds consisting of a nismakh and a somekh. Somekh is the second word, so עגבניות here is the somekh. The second word never changes form in smikhut, so you can’t really call it a case. However, it does have the sense “of tomatoes”, so it is vaguely similar to the genitive.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Construct_state

Learn Hebrew in just 5 minutes a day. For free.