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  5. "אין בעד מה!"

"אין בעד מה!"

Translation:You are welcome!

June 24, 2016

76 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ella.G

"Not at all." seems like it would also be a reasonable translation of this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fedor-A-learner

the only place where this sentence is used is when someone thanks someone else, then to be humble you say "don't mention it" or in spanish "de nada". whereas "not at all" can be used in other situations which are clearly not applicable in this case, hope this helps.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aaron750111

What about using בבקשה for welcome?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tu.8zPhLySD9eGoy

Not necessarily. "[T]o be humble," someone could also reply "not at all" to a "thank you"...I think.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dr.Seledki

How does it pronounce? Especially the second word?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KnightDelta

Ein Ba'ad Ma

אֵין בְּעַד מַה


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dr.Seledki

תודה רבה!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/deinauge

Thank you, it never gets spoken for me


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/annette636445

Yes, pronunciation would be helpful.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JonathanDi5663

It would literally mean "Nothing" "for" "what"... So in response to "Thank you" it would mean something like "For what?... It's nothing"

Like others have said... It has similar meant to other common English phrases like "don't mention it" or "forget about it" or "don't worry about it" or the closest literally but not so common in English "it was nothing"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nate896107

Those phrases in English are somewhat colloquial. Is the same true of the Hebrew, or is this now and has always been the formal expression for "you're welcome"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/magenavi

The formal expression would be בבקשה but also used, perhaps lesss formally, is this. Keep in mind, the general Israeli culture is very informal.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tu.8zPhLySD9eGoy

Wait, wasn't 'בבקשה' = "please"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YardenNB

Both "please" and "you're welcome".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DemetriDawn

If it helps, Hebrew uses a root system which is much more extensive than English. I personally am not good enough to know what the root is here, but I can see that within the word בבקשה at least two other words: בקשה (request) and קשה (difficult or hard). With this in mind perhaps this is closer to saying "to your request?" In other words "(It's nothing,) I'm fulfilling your request." Or more simply בבקשה could mean only please, and is used as "Please, don't thank me."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YardenNB

Literally בבקשה means "in a request", slightly less literally "as a request". I'm quite that the intention, before it was frozen as an idiom, is "you don't have to thank me, I'm asking you to have it (take advantage of it, etc.). Hebrew probably adopted it from German "bitte" (literally "I am asking") or French "Je vous en prie" (literally "I am asking you that").


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fly2heights

Yes, In persian we say "chizi nist" which means "its nothing", and germans say "kein ding" also means "not a thing"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sarah916878

While you can say "kein Ding" in German, it is very colloquial and not as polite as other options. You would say it with close friends, but in a work place or with strangers you are better off saying "keine Ursache" (most standard) or "kein Problem" (which would be like ain beaya according to an Israeli friend). Just wanted to add, in case someone who is learning German comes across. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Geraldine1610

Or you can also say "Nichts zu danken" or "Gern geschehen" :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AneurinEE

What would a literal translation of this phrase be?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jsmitten

According to Wiktionary, "there is not a sake/cause for that"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tre_mojosa

So really, this is more "aw, shucks" than "you are welcome."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/danny912421

What does "aw, shucks" mean?

This "you are welcome" is used as a response after someone thanks you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lukeandros

Aw, shucks is somewhat regional and dated, but is an idiomatic phrase from the American South, "aw, shucks t'wern't nothing" is a politely embarrassed way of receiving a thank you or receiving credit or praise for something. Aw shucks is akin to "Gee, golly". It's just an expression or interjection of bewilderment. Usually it's used nowadays in humorous or sometimes ironic fashion.

Shucks can also be used for mild chagrin or disappointment, or a mild oath. Read some Mark Twain you'll get a sense of it.

https://english.stackexchange.com/questions/41556/why-is-shucks-as-in-aw-shucks-used-with-an-s-ending


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/diamonland

I always thought it translated very literally to "there isnt - thing - what", which is more like "It's nothing", but duo lingo didn't like that answer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JordiReiss

In British English a regular way to say "you are welcome" is "any time". I think this should be accepted as a correct answer


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TseDanylo

In Ireland we say "No bother" this should be accepted too :(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aha528145

"All good fam" was not accetped either wtf


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jip259984

Looks like french "de rien" which literrally means "of nothing" and is used to mean "you are welcome"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shmuel798165

It's closer to any time or no problem or not at all


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JordanMizr

Is this commonly used? I've never heard this said before?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Blacknoirschwarz

I would reply with בטח! (Literally: Sure!) or ברור! (Literally: of course) but אין בעד מה would be the more formal and polite thing to say:)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BlaireN

Or בכיף no one in Israel uses this phrase...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShylockIII

How are we supposed to translate this - it's new and there are no 'dictionary hovers'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arielshin

על לא דבר literally means for not a thing. And its very much like dont mention it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/laura499062

I learnt your welcome as also bvakasha


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YardenNB

bevakasha בבקשה al lo davar על לא דבר ein baad ma אין בעד מה

Can all be used as a reply to תודה. Other Hebrewers here said there is some difference in level of formality. They may be right but IMHO the differences in formality are microscopic... You can choose any and you'll be fine (:


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/boonie505808

Typos make me get the answee wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hsn626796

So how does אין fit into the welcome statement ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Blacknoirschwarz

It's like a "don't mention it" expression (not literally the same but the use and idea of it). It's a "you're welcome" as a reply to "thank you" not as welcoming someone into your home:) I hope that answered your question:)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hsn626796

Yes, thank you. I hope you can provide me also with a word for word literal translation of the statement so that I may remember it better .


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gldrst

אין - In this particular sentence it is a negation or the (Philosophy of) nothingness, nihility

בעד - for, in favor of ; in agreement with, siding with ; for the sake of ; (literary) through, via

מה - what ; how much ; why, how


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Blacknoirschwarz

As jsmitten mentioned, "there is not a sake/cause for that" would be the literal translation that makes sense. Think of it as a reply to "thank you" since it's the only use for אין בעד מה. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Blukkee

אין בעיה


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Philomelow

what is the difference between this expression to say "you're welcome", and : על לא דבר ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/D.EstherNJ

"Don't mention it" is an acceptable answer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Oscar_Dominguez

"It's nothing" is another good translation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Texanberg

https://forvo.com/word/%D7%90%D7%99%D7%9F_%D7%91%D7%A2%D7%93_%D7%9E%D7%94/#he

I just posted the link to this whole expression. This sounds to me as:

Ain bead ma.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TETRABigYe

what? ayn should be negative, "there is no" or "not have something" is this correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/danny912421

It's a phrase. You don't translate individual words in a phrase.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VictorYRC

Thank you KnightDelta


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nassib8

The French "Il n'y a pas de quoi" may be the nearest literal translation and it is commonly used for "you are welcome"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/danny912421

Are you writing this to let us know it was rejected? Well, yes, because "your" is not the same as "you're" or "you are" which would be correct, and since "your" is a possessive pronoun, it is not correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leonid125157

"not at all" the best variant


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jen907156

I've seen this phrase several times in this lesson, but I've never had the pronunciation come up. Also, I've never heard my Israeli friends say it. How common is this phrase IRL?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YardenNB

It's probably no longer common, but it was common a few decades ago, so people do know it, and I expect some percentage of Israelis - older ones? - still use it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Phil901893

Can you give an audio of the Hebrew text. I am struggling to learn the letter sounds and this would be very helpful...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ahsanislam

אין בעד מה!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rajyshubei

For nothing is another reasonable translation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cliff698170

Would be good to hear the phrase


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Con857306

Literally: It is nothing, but this isnt accepted, only your welcome?!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DbvC6

That is not correct


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Philomelow

what does this mean then ? this is the expression one finds when searching for a translation of "you're welcome"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/richardbel14

I've never heard this expression when i was learning the language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Con857306

Ridiculous! Also didnt accept your welcome, wanted only: you are welcome, good grief!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yomalyn

"You're welcome" is accepted :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RafaelReina

IS PRONOUNCED ''EIN''? BECAUSE SOUND AS USA SLANG!

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