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  5. "מאז שחזרתי לכדור הארץ יש לי …

"מאז שחזרתי לכדור הארץ יש לי שומרי ראש."

Translation:Since I returned to Earth I have had bodyguards.

June 24, 2016

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mabel544786

I realy whish she would talk a bit slower, f instance it is very difficult to hear if she says "shomre-e rosh" or "shomri rosh". I know israelis talk fast in normal life, but as a new beginner I think our progress both in understanding and our own ability to speak, would be faster and better if she could slow down a bit and put a bit more intention to the phrases like the mail voice does. I do not know who is reading these commentaries, but if some one in charge in duo lingo does, maybe an idea to let people answer a questionar about this. Maybe it is just me, or maybe I have a point and others agree, i don' t know.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/airelibre

We’re aware of this concern. For the immediate future we can’t do anything, but we have a few possible solutions which require intervention from the programmers which we hope might be implemented eventually.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chris765901

I'm curious to know more about were she has been :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jacob29928

Why is it that יש can mean "have had" here? Do you not need to say:

מאז שחזרתי לכדור הארץ היו לי שומרי ראש

?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/altan570786

Have had is redant imho. "Since something past I have something" is meaningful in English and you don't need the past perfect form. Maybe have got is a better suggestion.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/radagastthebrown

Your suggestion implies that you no longer have bodyguards. If you had bodyguards since then until now, then you use present tense, i.e. יש.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alex387130

out of curiosity, is there a reason why "bodyguard" translates literally to 'head-guard' in hebrew?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/airelibre

Just seems to be the way it developed. Why is it a body-guard in English, don't they protect the head too? In Spanish they say "back-guard".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dov360473

That's rather thought provoking. Could it be that different cultures had different concerns about what's important to protect? Or, that medical concepts were different in these cultures?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DL-Trolls

Ha. Now that you bring it up, maybe it is possible that ancient Hebrews would kill via a spike to the head. (Maybe that one chick, in the Bible, did what everybody did.)

:D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jameslyons

The word "body" is typically assumed to mean the entire physical corpus of a human being - not just the trunk - so it would include the head.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jbfmatl

The voice actor says "le-chadoor haaretz". Is this formal or hypercorrect, compared to "le-kadoor haaretz"? What would the average Israeli say?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/airelibre

Formal but not hypercorrect. On the street probably lekadur but in a formal interview lekhadur.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jacob29928

(To clarify: "Have had" was the alternative translation given at the end of the question)

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