https://www.duolingo.com/dvdtknsn

"Hast du den Bär gesehen?"

January 29, 2013

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/dvdtknsn

"Bär" sounds like "Bar" in the audio. For some reason I can't report the audio as poor in this question so despite the specific instruction not to report mistakes here, I have no choice!

January 29, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/christian

You can always use the feedback button on the very left side of your screen.

Anyway, it's not just the audio that's wrong. It should say "Hast du den Bären gesehen?"

January 29, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/GregTrotter

Is Bär one of those words like Elefant?

January 30, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Katherle

Yes, exactly. It's a so-called "weak noun (n-declension)" like Elefant or Junge, i.e. it's one of those nouns that add an "-(e)n".

January 30, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/wataya

@GregTrotter: http://duolingo.com/#!/comment/6421 declension: 'die Jungs, der Jungs, den Jungs, die Jungs'

January 30, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/GregTrotter

Thanks Katherle. Can I just clear up one thing. Is Jungs only correct as plural in nominative, but Jungen in the other cases?

January 30, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/dvdtknsn

Ah... hadn't noticed the feedback option. Many thanks! If it is indeed "Bären" here, I wonder how that mistake could have happened. Surely the questions must be set by native German speakers?

January 30, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Katherle

My guess is that most sentences in the exercises were computer-generated, although they were at some point probably proofread by somebody who is proficient in German. There are grammatical phenomena that even native speakers frequently get wrong. In German, these include the n-declension (words like Bär), the use of the Konjunktiv (subjunctive) and the genitive case after prepositions. Languages are always changing, and it's quite likely that in fifty years from now, the sentence "Hast du den Bär gesehen?" will be regarded as correct. But we haven't reached that stage yet :).

January 30, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/wataya

Concerning computer generated sentences, I agree. Concerning systematic proof reading, I have some doubts...

January 30, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/PatriciaJH

I suspect the proof reading is being crowd-sourced. To us.

August 12, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/wataya

@Katherle: Some rumours say, the original Latin phrase was used in gladiator fights and sounded more like 'in dubio pro leo'. ;-)

January 30, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Katherle

@wataya: In dubio pro reo :). But you might be right.

January 30, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Zelbinian

Pardon, but why would't you only use that for plural? Couldn't you use it as stated int eh question to mean just one bear?

July 9, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/wataya

Your question has already been answered. There is no plural here. "Bär" is a weak noun and therefore gets an 'en' ending in all cases except nominative.

July 9, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Zelbinian

Huh. I don't think I've been introduced to the concept of weak/strong nouns yet; that cart's before the horse.

July 9, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/wataya

@Zelbinian: Yes, it's unfortunate that they're outsourcing this kind of stuff into the discussions. I was a bit shocked to learn that the decision makers at duolingo don't consider decent grammar introductions a high priority.

July 9, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/wordlover42

Per conjugation of sehen, du would seem to take siehst (gesishst?) - pourquoi (ge)sehen? (Please excuse any absurd ignorance, I'm very new to German.)

July 14, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/christian

"gesehen" is a participle. It's the same for all pronouns.

http://www.dartmouth.edu/~german/Grammatik/perfect/Perfect.html

http://goo.gl/TqoC3

July 14, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/nateVONgreat

why is it not "have you seen THAT bear" previously it had Den, and i wrote that, it corrected me saying it meant "THAT, or ONE, or A" i think in relation to an apple.

August 27, 2013
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