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  5. "קמח תפוח אדמה."

"קמח תפוח אדמה."

Translation:Potato flour.

June 24, 2016

68 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/a.ak.t.j

Here we call potatoes "سيب زمينى" (seeb zamini) which means apple of the earth.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DesertWolfe

That is what they are called i n French also: "pomme de terre."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lea_q.n.z

Same for Swissgerman "Härdöpfel"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mgrdAT

Duden.de says that folk etymology derives this from "Herdapfel = Herd + Apfel = stove apple", but it really comes drom Erde+Apfel = earth apple.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Geraldine1610

In Southern Germany some people call it Erdäpfel :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yakirala

Also in Afrikaans! It is aardappel, so earth apple


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tsuj1g1r1

Shouldn't it be Seebéh zamini with ezafe though?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MattHaythem

Yes, but you wouldn't normally write that kasra in Persian, would you?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oldshoe5

A very common ingrediant in cooking for Passover.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shim

*ingredient


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/UziYeger

Same difference


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luke_5.1991

It helps me to think of it like this: "flour of apple of earth" = "flour of potato" = "potato flour".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cassieb98

FunFact: In Dutch, a potato is called 'aardappel' which translates to 'earth apple' or 'land apple'. Interesting that Hebrew does the same thing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AN2403

Not a coincidence at all, and therefore not weird. Potato is called 'earth apple' in many languages.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ynhockey

Same with French, pomme de terre means potato but is literally earth apple.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/schyrsivochter

Austrians call a potato „Erdapfel“ ‘earth apple’, too. (Germans say „Kartoffel“ though, which has no further meaning.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DennisMosesG

Russians also say that: картофель. I don't know whether or not they took it from the Germans. Oy vey.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YardenNB

Wiktionary is a good source for etymology. Yes, Russian took it from German. Now the etymology in German is truely fascinating - it came frmo "truffle" in Italian. They don't explain why on earth they named potatoes after truffles.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JetpackBrian

Cool! Just yesterday, I learned that in Old English, cucumbers were called earth apples: https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/eor%C3%BE%C3%A6ppel#Old_English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JetpackBrian

Oh, and probably unrelated, but the German word "Erdapfel" is also the name of one of the oldest globes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sunnyie

Ard in Arabic means earth , interesting!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tsuj1g1r1

No relation, though. “Ard” is related to “Earth”, while « أرض » is related to « ארץ ».


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YardenNB

I always thought "earth" and it's European cousins are related to أرض and its semitic cousins, but according to https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/earth#Etymology it's a coincidence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RoseDark94

kemakh tapuakh ademah


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chenzlearn

In Chinese potatoes are called 土豆 which means "beans of earth".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheOneAndOnlyBK

My initial reaction was "flour apple dirt". :P


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eva513111

Some german dialects say ground pear instead of earth apple. (Grumbiere)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eva513111

Kartoffel in German actually has a meaning or, more correctly, the meaning is a misunderstanding of the word truffle when potatoes were introduced in the 18th century and people thought it was a weird kind of truffle.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Geraldine1610

How funny is that :D but I have to admit, potatoes truly look like truffles! Well, at first sight...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marcoiris1

Very common on pesach


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/offset36

It is more acceptable to say "קמח תפוחי אדמה".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dan878472

Not sure why you got a downvote, As a non-native it seems a legitimate alternative, "flour of potatoes". Google translate uses the singular though. This is a triple construct, and most other flours e.g. almond flour, that are only double constructs use the second noun of the construct in the plural, so it makes sense to use תפוחי. Hebrew speakers, which is preferred?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dan878472

Thanks, that pretty much settled it--I think I saw one "תפוח" in there, but I did see several תפו״א. I assume it's not a double yod, but maybe a gershayim and it might be an abbreviation for potato. I got nowhere looking it up though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rich739183

Since it's a dynamic search-result page, we may get some different images. Just now I saw at least 3 that use תפוח (singular), although the great majority use תפוחי (plural). Also, I saw at least 3 that use the abbreviation with gershayim
תפו"א
Since that's a contraction of 2 words meaning potato, I wonder if it is used to avoid a commitment to spelling the first word as תפוח or תפוחי, either of which combines with אדמה in the context of potato flour.
https://www.morfix.co.il/%D7%AA%D7%A4%D7%95%22%D7%90

Edited with strikeout per info below from Yarden.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YardenNB

The acronyms תפ"א or תפו"א is very common, and is used for either a single or multiple potatoes, in just about any context. In just about any context I can think of, whether it's one potato or many is either obvious or doesn't matter or is meaningless (as with "flour"). The abbreviation is used for convenience, surely not to avoid singular/plural commitment.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YardenNB

To your question of pronunciation of the abbreviated form: it's pronounced fully, /tapuach/tapuchei adama/ (though, since it's so useful and yet so long, you'll often hear /tapcheadama/. Between my wife and me, we say /tapa/, but it's kind of private joke. Probably other people use the same private joke, but I wouldn't try it with someone I'm not intimately familiar with.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YardenNB

EdvntL - the definite form, formally, would be קמח תפוחי האדמה. Generally, there could be a chain of any length of constructs, the ה would come on the last: יצרני מכסי קופסאות קמח תפוחי האדמה.

In spoken Hebrew, however, most people would say הקמח תפוחי אדמה (and היצרנים של המכסים של הקופסאות של הקמח תפוחי אדמה. But not הקמח של התפוחים של האדמה, because קמח תפוחי אדמה is kind of a set phrase.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YardenNB

Yes, you'll definitely hear הבית כנסת, הבית ספר, הבית קפה more often than the "correct" form.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rich739183

Thanks, YardenNB. And would they be used orally, perhaps pronounced as "tapa" or "tapua"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EdvntL

How would you say "the potato flour"? Where does the -ה go?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EdvntL

Thank you! Does the informal usage of putting the -ה right in the beginning also occur in very common compounds like בית ספר,בית קפה and בית כנסת?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rich739183

Morfix has the "תפו"א" abbreviation. The following page has both תפ"א and תפו"א, but that source doesn't use gershayim:
https://www.abbreviations.com/acronyms/hebrew/125


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShaquilleLee

lol if I'm right, potato seems to be a combination of the words for apple, and dirt... lol potatoes are dirt apples.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AniOhevYayin

Since potatoes are not native to Europe, this ingredient has to be post 1492 (like tomatoes and corn). It's now a common ingredient at passover, of course.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianaJohns790807

Makes great latkes and is gluten free.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BarbaraTru946845

I've always heard it as potato starch, not potato flour. Is it different? Different texture?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rich739183

Here's the difference according to kingarthurflour.com, from the USA.

Potato flour is made from whole peeled potatoes, cooked, dried, and ground into a fine, beige-colored powder; and includes fiber, protein, and flavor.
Potato starch is pure flavorless starch.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FyodorS.

"Potato starch"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joshua688189

I wrote potato flour as an answer and it isnt being accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joshua688189

Idk jow to finish this lesson if thwy wont acceot my answer


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rich739183

In that situation, one can exit out of the lesson and hope that you don't get the same question with the same problem next time.
Before exiting, it would be great to take a screenshot to show the recommended answer that you can use if (when) you do get the same question again; and you can post the photo to the bug-report page on Duolingo website.

When answering the question the second time, be sure to type very carefully.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marjorie280956

Um..... Huh??? Makes NO sense!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sean.mullen

'Potato' is acting like an adjective, modifying קמח to describe what type of flour it is (and adjectives and determiners follow nouns in Hebrew)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maron92

its called potato starch not potato flour, and you can't just throw that out of the blue.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rich739183

Here's an informative article to replace the one that FaizalZahid posted, which is now a dead link.
https://tastessence.com/what-is-difference-between-potato-starch-potato-flour


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dieprinzessin

Thanks that is better than what I found. Great article.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/misho104

Theoretically agreed. However, in Israel....... (Google Image Search)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FaizalZahid

Yeah, the translation is correct on the packaging but the usage is not correct for cooking jargon...thanks for sharing the images :)

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