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  5. "של מי הילד הזה?"

"של מי הילד הזה?"

Translation:Whose is this boy?

June 25, 2016

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bpzlearner

Is "Whose boy is this?" correct. If not, how would you say that?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/langaugeartist

Is "Who is this boy?", "?מי הילד הזה"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KnightDelta

whose is the possessive form of who, so the question is actually to whom the child belongs (the answer can be "Rina", "Gila", "David" and so on)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Heysoos1

Except that we english speakers just say "whose." As much as it bothers you, that's modern English and we can't change it. Here, have a consolidation hug (^-^)/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HTIKVA

As a question in English should be "whose boy is this?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/polygloterin

Couldn't this also be translated as "Whose son is this?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luchtmens

I think that would use the word בן (son).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sofa4ka

Why not 'whose child is it '?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YardenNB

Should be accepted IMHO.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sabri449866

Why the "של" on the phrase?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NaftaliFri1

to indicate possession


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThapanDubayehudi

He is your servant David, the son of Jesse


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luchtmens

If ?של מי הילד הזה translates to "Whose is this boy?", how would one say "Whose boy is this?" in Hebrew? Would it be:

I ?הילד של מי זה?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YardenNB

Is there a difference between the two English sentences? The Hebrew sentence you suggest is possible, a bit unnatural, and I wouldn't attach it to one the two English variants more strongly than to the other.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IngeborgHa14

Well, בֶּן־מִי אַתָּה הַנַּ֫עַר ISam 17:58 Whose son are you, young man?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Theresa754142

Shel mi ha-yeled haze?

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