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  5. "בבקשה, שישה עשר לימונים."

"בבקשה, שישה עשר לימונים."

Translation:Here you go, sixteen lemons.

June 27, 2016

26 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hannah649004

Please can someone explain this sentence to me? I don't understand if this is a request for 16 lemons or someone giving someone 16 lemons. In English "Here you go ..." would be giving something and "Please" would be a request. Thank you


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luchtmens

I think it can mean both and the actual meaning depends on the context (though I'm no native speaker). I believe the word order might also slightly indicate the more possible meaning: שישה עשר לימונים, בבקשה would more likely mean "Sixteen lemons, please", while בבקשה, שישה עשר לימונים would more likely equate to "Here you go, sixteen lemons".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YardenNB

I'm a native speaker, and your analysis is precise and excellent.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rory489371

same. it is contextual


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mitchellackerson

since when does בבקשה mean here you go? Please but Here you go? Never in my life


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanRosauer

I think that is about variation in English between different countries. What would a polite person say to you as they hand you the lemons that you just paid for? That would be the translation in this context.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MAJC4

Couldn't it go either way? "Sixteen lemons, please" or "here you go, sixteen lemons". When not connected to a conversation how do you know?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NaftaliFri1

I think it could, and I think the exercise accepts both


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Walrosse

It doesn't work both ways (at least it doesn't sound right to me). If you want sixteen lemons, you would say: "שישה עשר לימונים בבקשה".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2finalbriancells

For all I know, they now accept "here you go, sixteen lemons".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanRosauer

Yes. It was the only option in the 'choose words' version. So strange!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/David392301

"Here you go" is a strange way of translating "בבקשה" I suppose technically it is correct (as is: "if you please" or "here is your order" but it's rarely written like that in English. Very strange.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mabel544786

Maybe בבקשה in this context could be translated as: "Our pleasure" ( to give you this, or to sell you this). בבקשה : I am thinking: please, to be pleased, pleasure...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidBenAbraham

NEVER heard 'here you go' for 'please' !!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/danny912421

But it doesn't mean "please". The word בבקשה can mean both "please" and "here you go", depending on the context, jusr like Luchtmens explained.

By your name I'd guess you were German. Well, בבקשה works just like "bitte".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rory489371

The translation should be "please, sixteen lemons"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anglea806373

Here you go seriously is not a translation into English that makes any sense in the context of Duo's lessons to date . I am a native English speaker living in Israel - The sentence in Hebrew is correct but Duo's offer of a translation for בבקשה as "here you go" should have been introduced in a different context


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnthonySer365691

mבבקשה means please . I never heard it meant here you go


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanRosauer

I'm not an Israeli, but I think the confusion here is with the English. בבקשה can be used when asking for something, (like please). But it is also used when responding to thanks (like you're welcome), or when giving something, such as the lemons in this sentence. A shopkeeper might say בבקשה as they hand over the thing you are buying. This is the meaning in this sentence.

But the English for it might vary between countries. I might say 'here you are' or 'here you go', but not sure if that applies in other places - eg USA.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BethBurnha

So you are saying it's a cultural thing to say בבקשה when giving a customer an item, as a form of politeness? I may have heard it and it didn't register in my American brain. I was in Israel for a year but never learned to use it in that way other than to politely say please. I would like to get more info about this if it's used in all stores etc?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YardenNB

I don't know if all shop keepers would say it, but I can't think of any other way to be really polite when handing something to someone. Maybe some shopkeepers would say the Hebrew versions of "enjoy", "bon apetit", "good luck", and whatnot., depending on the purpose of the thing they handed you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BethBurnha

I've never heard it used as "here you go" either, is there an Israeli in the house who can help us out? Or is this an error?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaryJaneKe4

I have an Israeli friend on FB I will ask :) they've been there for years and should know :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anglea806373

In Australia "here you go" is a coloquialism . I guess one might say that so is בבקשה when used this way - however this is a programme which is limited with its use and explanations - it really doesn't matter because with the opportunity to chat like this we all learn something ner

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