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  5. "Ele vem logo."

"Ele vem logo."

Translation:He comes soon.

January 30, 2013

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pacoserrano

I would have translated logo to later, it's too similar to the Spanish luego. Maybe I am wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZuMako8_Momo

I am a European Portuguese speaker, and I believe that "later" should be an accepted answer. It is for «Até logo.».


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThanKwee

I'm totally confused now! kkk

I thought that it was as follows:

"até mais" = "see you later"

"até logo" = "see you soon"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luis_Domingos

We don't use "até mais (ver)" in Portugal; "Até logo" is an expression we use when we know we'll see someone later that day, but that it's still going to takes us some time to get together (like a mom calling her kids after lunch, knowing they'll only be together in the evening).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThanKwee

Brigada Luis!

Ah, so maybe it's different in Brazil? I talk to some Brazilians on Skype, and I suppose that's where I got the idea.

So how would you say "See you soon" in Portugal?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luis_Domingos

You're welcome :) I don't think there's a fixed expression for that in Portuguese - we can say "tchau" or "adeus" when we're leaving someone's presence, "até amanhã" if you have plans for tomorrow, and "até à próxima" (the last one used primarily in formal encounters, not something you'd use with friends), but "até à vista" or "até mais ver" sound very oldfashioned in EP.

There are still many ways of saying you'll meet someone (especially if you've made arrangements for a later date when you last saw someone): "Depois falamos" (we'll talk later); "Depois ligo-te" (I'll call you later), "Depois combinamos melhor as coisas" (we'll set the details [of our next meeting] later). "Depois" here doesn't mean right after, but an unspecified moment of time in the future (so the action of talking/calling/arranging a meeting doesn't necessarily need to come to fruition).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZuMako8_Momo

In addition to Luis_Domingos' comment, there is also «Até breve.» = "See you soon" and even «Até já.», where «já» means "already," so it is almost like sooner than soon. It is hard to explain; I'm not even sure I understand it. :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aniger

"He's coming soon" is a more authentic native English translation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lingodingle

Or, "He is coming soon." On previous lessons they give "He comes." or "He is coming" or their equivalents for other verbs. But not here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lexflex

Could one say "he will come soon"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Diegovsky

I never heard the M of Vem... i just heard ve. então eu coloquei Ele ve logo. nunca consegui escutar VEM.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZuMako8_Momo

The «em» together sound like «ãe», as in «mãe». O «m» não se soa como qualquer «m» normal. It is a nasal diphthong. In Brazilian Portuguese, «em» actually sounds more like a nasal [ẽ] sound.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/j.e.evans

He comes soon sounds odd to a Londoner... 'He'll come soon' would be what was used.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JaapMeneer

'Ele vem cedo' would mean the same right?

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